Skip to main content

Full text of "What a young boy ought to know"

See other formats


Med 

K40935 


CommenDa* 
ttoitjS  from  : 
eminent  : : 
tenant)  : : 
^onten  : : 


Hit  I?  at  a ^louitg  ©ojr 

#wgt|i  ter  l^ucrUr 


W hat  Eminent  Peotm.hi  tin  America  Mat, 


JOSEPH  COOK,  D.D.,  LL.D. 

The  Eminent  Scholar ; Boston  Monday  Lecturer ; 
author  of  “ Biology,”  “ Marriage,”  “ Labor,” 

“ Socialism,”  “ Occident,”  “ Orient,”  etc. 

“Your  book  on  ‘What  a Young  Boy  Ought  to 
Know  ’ treats  its  subject  with  the  utmost  delicacy 
and  lucidity  and  is  severely  faithful  in  its  admonitions 
to  parents  as  well  as  to  the  young.  It  is  everywhere 
suggestive,  inspiring,  and  strategic  in  a degree,  as  I 
think,  not  hitherto  matched  in  literature  of  its  class. 
Its  wide  circulation  ought  to  fall  on  the  hearts  of  the 
young  in  their  thrifty  and  jubilant  vernal  season  as  a 
divine  benediction  of  light  and  heat  and  rain.” 


What  Eminent  People  in  America  Hat. 


THEODORE  L.  CUYLER,  D.D. 

The  best  living  writer  of  devotional  literature;  former 
pastor  of  Lafayette  Avenue  Church,  Brooklyn  ; author 
of  “Christianity  in  the  Home,”  “ How  to  be  a 
Pastor,”  “ Stirring  the  Eagle’s  Nest,” 

“ Young  Preacher,”  etc. 


“Your  admirable  little  book,  ‘What  a 
Young  Boy  Ought  to  Know,’  ought  to  be 
in  every  home  where  there  is  a boy.  You 
deserve  the  thanks  of  every  parent  in  the 
land.  ’ ’ 


What  Eminent  Pkoplh  in  America  Say. 


CHARLES  L.  THOMPSON,  D.D. 

Pastor  of  the  Madison  Avenue  Presbyterian  Church,  New 
York  City ; ex-Moderator  of  the  General  Assembly 
of  the  Presbyterian  Church  ; President  of  the 
Open  and  Institutional  Church  League; 

Associate  Editor  of  The  Open 
Church  Magazine , etc. 

“I  want  to  tell  you  how  much  I appreciate  your 
little  book.  It  is  indeed  what  boys  ought  to  know 

the  failure  to  know  which  has  been  the  cause  of 

many  sorrows  and  pains  and  penalties.  Why  was 
not  this  book  written  centuries  ago?  How  prudish 
and  false  to  human  interests  is  the  feeling  which  has 
kept  this  knowledge  back.  You  have  presented  it 
with  admirable  delicacy  and  fidelity,  and  for  one  I 
thank  you  for  it.” 


W hat  Eminent  I’kopt.to  iw  Amkki c a.  Say, 


MRS.  KATE  WALLER  BARRETT,  M.D.,  D.Sc. 

National  Superintendent  of  the  Florence  Crittenton 
Missions. 

“ If  every  mother  and  father  in  the  world  could  be 
made  to  read  Dr,  Stall’s  book,  and  to  enter  into  the 
spirit  of  it,  it  would  do  more  to  promote  the  cause  of 
right  living  than  anything  I know.  I have  been  study- 
ing methods  and  means,  looking  to  the  bringing  about 
of  such  an  understanding  of  the  sex  question  as  is  por- 
trayed in  Dr,  Stall’s  book,  for  the  past  twenty-one 
years,  and  I unhesitatingly  say  that  he  seems  to  me 
to  have  gotten  more  nearly  to  the  object  aimed  at, 
which  is  to  make  a boy  feel  the  responsibility  of  the 
potentiality  of  the  father  within  him  than  any  other 
person  I know  ; the  most  delicate  points  of  sex  rela- 
tions are  handled  in  a manner  clear,  concise,  and  with- 
out one  word  to  awaken  morbid  sentiment.  ‘ What  a 
Young  Boy  Ought  to  Know’  is  verily  scientific,  and 
yet  is  as  readable  as  a fairy  story.  No  home  is  com- 
plete without  it.’’ 


What  Emtnent  I'eopi.h  m Amirica  Say. 


J.  A.  WORDEN,  D.D. 

The  Eminent  Sunday-School  Worker. 


“ Your  book,  4 What  a Young  Boy  Ought  to  Know,’ 
must  have  been  given  unto  you  by  the  Father  in 
heaven,  both  in  its  conception  and  composition.  The 
idea  of  cleansing  the  heart  and  way  of  the  young 
man  by  God’s  truth  in  His  works  as  well  as  in  His 
word  is  a suggestion  of  the  Spirit.  Your  manner  of 
elucidating  and  elaborating  these  facts  and  truths  is  in 
the  first  place  faithful , then  delicate , and  avoids  both 
coarseness  and  prudishness.  May  God  bless  and  use 
your  book  which  He  has  evidently  animated.” 


What  Emlnknt  I’eopi.k  in  America  SaV. 


/ 

MRS.  ALICE  LEE  MOQUE. 

Author  of  “Woman:  Her  Heart,  Soul,  and  Body;” 
journalist  and  philanthropist. 

“Asa  woman,  working  with  hand  and  brain  for  the 
purity  and  uplifting  of  both  sexes,  I thank  you  for  your 
noble  little  book,  ‘ What  a Young  Boy  Ought  to  Know,’ 
— as  a mother,  with  three  growing  boys  of  my  own, 
resting  on  my  heart,  I bless  you  for  your  brave  words 
of  warning  and  pray  that  the  good  seeds  planted  may 
take  root  in  the  hearts  of  all  your  youthful  readers. 
Ignorance  is  a deadly  sin.  In  this  enlightened  age  we 
must  recognize  that  ignorance  is  not  innocence  and 
remember  that  to  forewarn  our  boys  is  to  forearm  them. 
The  truth  properly  told  has  never  yet  harmed  a child  ; 
silence,  false  shame,  and  mystery  have  corrupted  the 
souls  and  bodies  of  untold  millions.” 


What  Pbopi^hi  in  Engi^and  Sat. 


REV.  F.  B.  MEYER,  B. A. 

Minister  of  Christ  Church,  Westminster,  London;  author 
of  “ Israel,  A Prince  with  God,”  “ Elijah  ; Tried 
by  Fire,”  “ The  Bells  of  Is,”  etc.,  etc. 

“The  questions  which  are  dealt  with  in  the  ‘Self 
and  Sex  Series’  of  books  are  always  being  asked, 
and  if  the  answer  is  not  forthcoming  from  pure  and 
wise  lips  it  will  be  obtained  through  vicious  and  em- 
pirical channels.  I therefore  greatly  commend  this 
series  of  manuals,  which  are  written  lucidly  and 
purely,  and  will  afford  the  necessary  information  with- 
out pandering  to  unholy  and  sensual  passion.  There 
has  been,  in  my  judgment,  too  much  reticence  on  the 
whole  of  this  subject,  and  nameless  sins  have  origi- 
nated in  ignorance  or  in  the  directions  given  to  young 
life  by  vicious  men.  I should  like  to  see  a wide  and 
judicious  distribution  of  this  literature  among  Chris- 
tian circles.” 


W hat  Eminent  People  in  A mkrica  Say. 


BISHOP  JOHN  H.  VINCENT,  D.D.,  LL.D. 

Chancellor  of  Chautauqua  University  ; author  of  “ Sunday 
School  Institutes  and  Normal  Classes,”  “ The 
Church  School  and  its  Officers,”  etc. 


“You  have  handled  with  great  delicacy  and  wis- 
dom an  exceedingly  difficult  subject ; one  which  it 
is  almost  dangerous  to  broach,  but  which  must  be 
presented  to  the  growing  boy  and  to  his  parents  in 
a frank  way,  and  with  forcible,  practical,  scientific 
hints  for  prevention  and  correction.  Your  work  has 
been  well  done.” 


VV ha  L'  Kminent  People  in  Enqiand  Ha t. 


REV.  THOMAS  SPURGEON. 

Pastor  of  Metropolitan  Tabernacle,  President  of 
Pastor’s  College,  Author  “ The  Gospel  of 
Grace  of  God,”  “Scarlet  Thread  and 
Bits  of  Blue,”  “Down  to  the 
Sea,”  etc. 

“If  it  is  deemed  advisable  to  put  such 
information  into  the  hands  of  boys  I cannot 
imagine  it  possible  to  have  it  in  better  form 
than  in  4 What  a Young  Boy  Ought  to 
Know.’  ” 


What  Ei 


v k -N'T  People  in  England  Sat. 


LADY  HENRY  SOMERSET. 

Philanthropist,  President  National  British  Temperance  As- 
sociation, President  World’s  Christian  Temper- 
ance Union,  established  and  edited 
“ Woman’s  Signal,”  etc. 

“ I think  ‘ What  a Young  Boy  Ought  to  Know  ’ is 
calculated  to  do  an  immense  amount  of  good.  I 
sincerely  hope  it  may  find  its  way  to  many  homes 
in  which  it  may  be  a blessing.  I have  long  felt 
that  we  do  not  do  enough  to  warn  our  children 
against  the  particular  difficulties  that  are  certain  to 
meet  them  as  they  go  out  into  life.” 


What  Emmsnt  People  in  America  Sat, 


ANTHONY  COMSTOCK. 

Secretary  of  the  New  York  Society  for  the  Suppression  of 
Vice  ; author  of  “ Frauds  Exposed,”  “ Traps  for 
the  Young,”  etc. 

“ I have  read  the  book  ‘ What  a Young  Boy  Ought 
to  Know  ’ with  a great  deal  of  interest,  first,  because 
I am  deeply  impressed  with  the  necessity  for  instruct- 
ing the  boys  of  the  day  ; secondly,  because  what  you 
have  presented  is  presented  in  such  a way  as  to  lift  the 
mind  and  thoughts  upon  a high  and  lofty  plane  upon 
delicate  subjects.  I am  satisfied  that  every  parent  who 
has  a boy  would  be  benefited  if  he  would  carefully  read 
this  book  himself  and  then  communicate  the  facts  to 
his  boy,  either  by  putting  the  book  into  the  boy’s  hand 
or  using  your  methods  as  a medium  for  instructing  the 
boy  about  things  which  he  ought  to  know.  There  is 
a great  demand  for  this  book,  and  I hope  it  may  be 
blessed  to  the  elevation  of  the  thoughts  and  hearts  of 
the  boys  of  this  nation,  and  to  the  bringing  in  of  a 
better  and  higher  social  condition.” 


What  Eminent  Phoplb  ns-  America  Sat, 


JOHN  WILLIS  BAER. 

General  Secretary  of  the  United  Society  of  Christian 
Endeavor. 

“ If  there  is  anything  that  I can  say  that  will 
stimulate  the  reading  of  Dr.  Stall’s  book  entitled 
‘ What  a Young  Boy  Ought  to  Know,’  I am  anxious 
to  say  that  word.  I wish  every  parent  might  give 
the  book  careful  reading.  I feel  confident  that  it  can 
do  great  good,  and  I mean  that  my  boys  shall  have 
the  contents  placed  before  them.  I am  planning  now 
to  read  the  book  aloud  to  them.” 


\ V hat  Eminent  People  tin  America  Sat, 


JOSIAH  STRONG,  D.D. 

General  Secretary  of  the  Evangelical  Alliance  for  the 
United  States  ; author  of  “ Our  Country,”  “ New 
Era,”  etc. 

“Your  treatment  of  a most  delicate  subject  is 
eminently  wise.  Permit  me  to  say  that  your  method 
is  precisely  that  which  I employed  a few  years  ago 
with  my  own  boy.  A foolish  and  culpable  silence  on 
the  part  of  most  parents  leaves  their  children  to  learn, 
too  often  from  vicious  companions,  sacred  truth  in  an 
unhallowed  way.  Your  book  is  most  reverent  and 
will  inspire  reverence.  I hope  many  parents  will  have 
the  wisdom  to  make  use  of  it.” 


What  Eminent  J^tbott/hi  in’  America  Say. 


AARON  M.  POWELL. 

Editor  of  The  Philanthropist ; President  of  the  American 
Purity  Alliance. 

“ I have  just  finished  reading  the  admirable  book  ‘ What  a 
Young  Boy  Ought  to  Know.’  I regard  it  as  a most  valuable 
addition  to  Purity  literature,  especially  for  boys  and  young 
men.  The  reverential  spirit  with  which  it  deals  withthe  pro- 
foundly important  subject  of  the  sexual  life  cannot  but  prove 
most  helpful  to  the  young  who  maybe  so  fortunate  as  to  come 
under  its  educational  influence.  In  view  of  the  widespread 
neglect  of  parents  and  teachers  to  give  instruction  along  this 
line  to  boys,  many  feeling  incompetent  to  do  it,  and  others 
inclined  to  avoid  the  subject  altogether,  it  will,  properly 
circulated,  fill  a large  place  of  usefulness.  Of  its  great  need, 
we  are  having  continually  only  too  many  impressive  and 
painful  object  lessons  in  the  blighted  lives  of  many  other- 
wise promising  young  men  and  in  the  ruined  homes  of 
many  who  are  older.” 


What  Eminent  Peopi.b  in  America  Say. 


MRS.  MARY  A.  LIVERMORE,  LL.D. 

Lecturer;  author  of  “My  Story  of  the  War,”  “ Woman 
of  the  Century,”  “ The  Story  of  -My  Life,”  etc. 

“I  have  carefully  read  Dr.  Stall’s  little  book, 
‘What  a Young  Boy  Ought  to  Know,’  and  am  glad 
to  commend  it.  He  has  treated  the  most  delicate 
subjects  so  wisely  that  the  most  fastidious  cannot 
object.  The  short  chapters,  full  of  physiological 
truths,  which  all  children  ought  to  know,  at  a proper 
age,  will  be  read  by  boys  without  awakening  a pru- 
rient thought ; and  the  warning  against  harmful  habits 
and  thoughts  must  prove  a safeguard.” 


/ 


( ; 


Pure  Books  on  Avoided  Subjects 

Books  for  Men 

By  Sylvanus  Stall , D.  D. 

“What  a Young  Boy  Ought  to  Know." 
“What  a Young  Man  Ought  to  Know." 
“What  a Young  Husband  Ought  to  Know." 
“What  a Man  of  45  Ought  to  Know." 


Books  for  TEomen 

By  Mrs.  Mary  Wood- Allen,  M.  D., 
And  Mrs.  Emma  F.  A.  Drake , M.  D. 

“What  a Young  Girl  Ought  to  Know." 
“What  a Young  Woman  Ought  to  Know." 
“What  a Young  Wife  Ought  to  Know." 
“What  a Woman  of  45  Ought  to  Know." 


PRICE  AND  BINDING 

The  books  are  issued  in  uniform  size  and  but 
one  style  of  binding,  and  sell  in  America  at  $i,  in 
Great  Britian  at  4s.,  net,  per  copy,  post  free, 
whether  sold  singly  or  in  sets. 

PUBLISHED  BY 
IN  THE  UNITED  STATES 

THE  VIR  PUBLISHING  COMPANY 
2237  Land  Title  Building  Philadelphia 

IN  ENGLAND 

THE  VIR  PUBLISHING  COMPANY 

7 Imperial  Arcade,  Ludgate  Circus,  London,  L.C. 

IN  CANADA 

WILLIAM  BRIGGS 

29-33  Richmond  Street  West  Toronto,  Ontario 


SYLVANUS  STALL,  D.D. 


PRICE  $1.00  NET 
4s.  NET 


PURITY  AND  TRUTH 

Self  and  Sex  Series 


WHAT  A YOUNG  BOY 

OUGHT  TO  KNOW 


BY 

SYLVANUS  STALL,  D.  D. 

Author  of  " What  a Young  Man  Ought  to  Know  ” - IVhat  a 
Young  Husband  Ought  to  Know,”  “ What  a Man  of  45 
Ought  to  Know,”  "Methods  of  Church  Work,”"  Five- 
Minute  Object  Sermons  to  Children ,”  " Talks  to 
the  King's  Children,”  “ Bible  Selections  for 
Daily  Devotion,”  etc..  Associate  Editor 
(f  the  “ Lutheran  Observer.” 


“Ignorance  is  Vice  ."—Socrates. 


Philadelphia,  Pa.:  *237  Land  Title  Building 

THE  VIR  PUBLISHING  COMPANY 

London  : 7,  Imperial  Arcade,  Ludgate  Circus,  E.  C. 


Toronto  : Wm.  Briggs,  33  Richmond  Street,  West 


WEU.COM?  Hv..  rniiTE 

U9RAAV 

Cot). 

wlMOmoe 
1 - - 

Wo. 

\ajA/\ 

Copyright,  1897,  by  SYLVANUS  STALL 


Entered  at  Stationers'  Hall,  London,  England 

Protected  by  International  copyright  in  Great  Britain  and  all 
her  colonies,  and,  under  the  provisions  of  the  Berne  Conven- 
tion, in  Belgium,  France,  Germany,  Italy,  Spain,  Switzer- 
land, Tunis,  Hayti,  Luxembourg,  Monaco,  Montenegro, 
and  Norway 


All  rights  reserved 


[printed  in  the  united  states J 


Defeated 


TO 

THE  THOUSANDS  OF  BOYS  WHOSE  HONEST  INQUIRIES 
CONCERNING  THE  ORIGIN  OF  LIFE  AND  BEING 
DESERVE  SUCH  A TRUTHFUL,  INTELLIGENT,  AND  v 
SATISFACTORY  ANSWER  AS  WILL  SAVE 
THEM  FROM  IGNORANCE,  ENABLE 
THEM  TO  AVOID  VICE,  AND 
DELIVER  THEM  FROM 
SOLITARY  AND  SO- 
CIAL SINS.  ' 


CONTENTS, 


PAGE 

Preface, 

Introductory, i9 

PART  I. 

God’s  Purpose  in  Endowing  Plants,  Ani- 
mals, and  Man  with  Reproductive 
Organs. 

CYLINDER  I. 

The  Question  of  the  Origin  of  Life,  Natural 
and  Proper. — To  Go  Back  to  the  Begin- 
ning.— The  Account  of  Creation  in  Gen- 
esis.— Difference  Between  Making  and 
Creating. — God  Created  Everything  out 
of  Nothing. — From  Some  Objects  God 
Withheld  the  Power  to  Produce  Others. 
—Upon  Others  He  Bestowed  Reproduc- 
tive Power. — This  Power  Closely  Re- 
sembles Creative  Power,  . . .25 

CYLINDER  II. 

The  Creation  of  Plants,  Animals,  and  Man, 
Each  after  His  Kind. — How  God  Created 
Adam  and  Eve. — The  Bible  Account. — 
Reproductive  Power  Ordained  of  God. — 
God  Would  Not  Make  a Law  that  Had 


3 


4 


CONTENTS. 


page 

Impurity  in  It. — If  We  Do  Not  Blush  at 
the  Manner  in  Which  God  Created  Adam 
and  Eve.  Neither  Should  We  at  the  Man- 
ner in  Which  He  Created  Cain  and  Abel. 

— Thinking  God’s  Pure  Thoughts  after 
Him. — Reproductive  Resembles  Crea- 
tive Power, 31 

CYLINDER  III. 

Father,  Mother,  and  Baby  Plants. — “ Male 
and  Female  Created  He  Them.” — The 
Father  and  Mother  Natures  in  the  Same 
Stalk. — Seen  only  at  Maturity  of  Stalk 
in  the  Production  of  the  Seed. — Seen  in 
the  Cornfield. — The  Ears  with  the  Silk 
the  Female,  and  the  Tassels  with  the 
Pollen  the  Male  Manifestation. — The 
Father  and  Mother  Natures  Sometimes 
Separated. — The  Pollen  Carried  by  the 
Wind  and  Insects. — Were  God  to  De- 
stroy the  Reproductive  Power  of  Plants 
and  Trees,  all  Vegetable  Life  Would 
Disappear  and  Animals  and  Men  Would 
Die  of  Starvation, 37 

CYLINDER  IV. 

Plant  Life  Perpetuated  by  Reproduction. 

— Organic  Life  Divided  into  Sentient,  or 
Feeling,  and  Non-feeling  Beings. — Sen- 
tient Beings  Produce  Eggs  Instead  of 
Seeds. — The  Papa  and  Mamma  Natures 
United  in  the  Oyster. — The  Early  Life 
of  the  Baby  Oyster. — The  Papa  and 
Mamma  Natures  Separated  in  Fishes. — • 

The  Female  Fish  Lays  the  Eggs : the 


CONTENTS . 


5 

PAGE 

Male  Fish  Fertilizes  Them  with  a Fluid 
While  Swimming  over  the  Eggs. — The 
Fishes  Are  Hatched  by  the  Action  of  the 
Water  and  Warmth  of  the  Sun. — Baby 
Oysters  and  Fishes  are  Orphans,  . . 43 

CYLINDER  V. 

How  Seeds  Are  Made  to  Grow. — How  Eggs 
Are  Hatched. — The  Habits  of  Parent 
Birds  While  Hatching. — The  Beautiful 
Lessons  They  Teach. — The  Dangers  to 
which  Little  Birds  Are  Exposed. — Their 
Return  from  Sunny  Climes  to  Build 
Nests  of  Their  Own. — Animals  Next  in 
the  Order  of  Creation. — Reasons  Why 
Animals  Do  Not  Lay  Eggs. — The  Egg 
Retained  in  the  Body  of  the  Mother  Ani- 
mal.— Her  Body  Marvelously  Furnished. 

— After  Sufficient  Growth  the  Young 
Animal  is  Born. — After  Birth,  Still  Nour- 
ished from  the  Mother’s  Body. — Weaned 
when  the  Teeth  Grow. — Lowest  Ani- 
mals Reach  Bodily  Maturity  Soonest. — 
Man  Highest  in  the  Scale  of  Being. — 
Longest  of  All  in  Reaching  Maturity. — 
Value  of  Childhood  Years,  . . .49 

v 

CYLINDER  VI. 

Had  God  Created  All  as  He  Did  Adam 
and  Eve,  Our  Present  Conditions  and  Re- 
lations Could  Not  Exist. — There  Would 
Be  No  Homes,  Parents,  or  Children. — 

No  Childhood  with  Plays  and  Pleasures. 

— All  Plans  Were  Open  to  God. — He 


6 


CONTENTS. 


PAGE 

Chose  the  Best  Plan. — God  Gave  Man 
Power  Similar  to  His  Creative  Power. — 
Purity  of  Parentage. — Why  Parents  Love 
Their  Children.— The  Twain  Made  One 
in  Their  Children. — The  Human  Egg, 
or  Ovum. — The  Male  Life  Germ. — How 
Life  is  Begotten. — Conversation  of 
Mother  and  Child. — The  Study  of  the 
Subject  Begets  Awe  and  Reverence. — 

The  Wisest  Cannot  Fully  Understand 
or  Explain  our  Beginning  and  Growth,  57 

CYLINDER  VII. 

Papa’s  Request  to  Continue  the  Talks. — 
Why  Children  Look  Like  Their  Parents. 

— Parents  Transmit  Both  Bodily  and 
Mental  Characteristics. — Unhealthy  Par- 
ents Cannot  Have  Healthy  Children. — 
What  the  Boy  is,  Determines  What  the 
Man  Shall  Be,  and  What  His  Children 
Shall  Be. — The  Boy’s  Duty  to  Those 
Who  Are  to  Come  after  Him. — A Good 
Inheritance  No  Occasion  for  Boasting. — 

“ Heredity  Not  Fatality.” — Duty  to  Im- 
prove What  We  Have,  . . . .67 

PART  II. 

The  Manner  in  which  the  Reproductive 
Organs  are  Injured  in  Boys  by  Abuse. 
CYLINDER  VIII. 

Man  is  an  Animal. — Has  Intelligence,  a 
Moral  Sense,  and  a Conscience. — How 
the  Intellect,  Moral  Sense,  and  Con- 


CONTENTS. 


f 

PAGE 

science  are  Dwarfed  and  Blunted.— 
Comparative  Anatomy. — Points  of  Re- 
semblance in  Bodies  of  Man  and  Four- 
footed  Animals. — Between  Man  and 
Birds. — Man  the  Only  Animal  with  a 
Perfect  Hand. — Without  the  Hand,  Man 
Could  Not  Rise  Much  above  the  Ani- 
mals.— With  the  Hand,  He  Constructs, 
Builds,  and  Blesses  His  Fellows. — With 
the  Hand,  He  Smites,  Slays,  and  Injures. 

— With  His  Hand  He  Pollutes  and  De- 
grades Himself, 75 

CYLINDER  IX. 

God’s  Purpose  in  Giving  Us  Hands. — The 
Confidence  God  Has  Reposed  in  Our 
Use  of  Them.— With  Man,  the  Sexual 
Member  Is  Exposed. — Through  Ignor- 
ance, Boys  Often  Learn  Masturbation. — 
Sliding  Down  the  Banister,  Climbing 
Trees,  etc. — Danger  from  Ignorant  and 
Evil  Servants. — Intelligence  Necessary 
for  Safety, 82 


CYLINDER  X. 

The  Sexual  Member  a Part  of  the  Repro- 
ductive System.  — The  Reproductive 
System  Defined.  — Illustrated  By  a 
Watch. — The  Different  Parts  of  the 
Digestive  System. — God  Gave  Us  a Re- 
productive System  for  the  Wisest  and 
Most  Beneficent  Ends. — By  Wrong 
Thoughts  of  Them,  We  Dishonor  God. 
— To  Be  Held  in  Purity  and  Honor. — 


8 


CONTENTS. 


PAGE 

Our  Bodies  the  Temples  of  the  Holy- 
Ghost. — The  Holy  Place,  and  the  Holy 
of  Holies. — The  Wonderful  Mystery  of 
Creative  Power. — How  the  Mind,  Im- 
agination, and  Heart  Are  Polluted. — 
What  the  Bible  Says  Upon  These  Sub- 
jects. .......  87 

PART  III. 

What  are  the  Consequences  in  Boys 
of  the  Abuse  of  the  Reproductive 
Organs. 

CYLINDER  XI. 

Origin  of  the  Different  Names  of  the  Sex- 
ual Sin. — Tell  of  the  Character  of  the 
Sin. — The  Class  of  Boys  in  Greatest  Dan- 
ger.—Need  of  Proper  Information. — An 
Important  Safeguard. — The  Moral  Sense 
the  First  to  Suffer. — Vice  Begets  in  the 
Heart  Rebellion  against  God. — The 
Vicious  Most  Liable  to  Doubt  God  and 
Become  Infidels. — Unbelief  and  Infidel- 
ity Symptoms  of  Sexual  and  other  Sins,  97 

CYLINDER  XII. 

Effect  on  the  Character  of  Boys. — After 
the  Effects  upon  the  Moral  Nature, 
Those  of  the  Nervous  System  Appear. 

— The  Spasm  of  the  Nerves. — The  Mind 
Next  to  Suffer. — The  Visible  Effects 
upon  the  Mind. —Physical  Effects  Fol- 
low.— Character  of  These  Effects  Stated. 

— Competent  Physician  Can  Judge  Ac- 


CONTENTS. 


9 

PAGE 

curately. — The  Habit  Grows  Strong,  and 
the  Will  Grows  Weak. — Results  Where 
the  Practice  Is  Persisted  in. — The  Treat- 
ment in  Extreme  Cases. — The  Impor- 
tance of  Early  Instruction,  . . . 102 

CYLINDER  XIII. 

The  Boy  who  Practices  Solitary  Vice  Not 
the  Solitary  Sufferer. — The  Sins  of  Chil- 
dren Visited  upon  Their  Parents. — Par- 
ents often  the  Greatest  Sufferers. — What 
Parents  Do  for  Their  Children. — During 
Infancy. — During  Childhood. — Should 
Not  Disappoint  Their  Hopes. — Broth- 
ers and  Sisters  Made  to  Suffer. — His 
Children  after  Him  Must  Suffer  the  Re- 
sults of  His  Sin. — We  Reproduce  Our- 
selves.— Cannot  Transmit  what  We  Do 
Not  Possess. — What  We  Are  That  Our 
Children  Will  Be. — The  Character  of  the 
Boys  and  Girls  of  To-day  Determines 
the  Character  of  the  Nation  a Hundred 
Years  to  Come, 109 

PART  IV. 

How  Boys  May  Preserve  Their  Entire 
Bodies  in  Purity  and  Strength. 

CYLINDER  XIV. 

How  Purity  and  Strength  May  Be  Pre- 
served.—Our  Space  Not  Sufficient  to 
Tell  All. — Subject  to  Be  Pursued  in 
other  Books. — “ Cleanliness  Next  to  God- 


10 


CONTENTS. 


PAG  B 

liness.” — Purity  of  Mind  and  Body.— A 
Pure  Heart  the  First  Requisite. — Guard- 
ing the  Heart. — Danger  from  Impure 
Books. — Purity  of  the  Body.  — The 
Weekly  and  Daily  Bath. — The  Rite 
of  Circumcision  as  Related  to  Purity. — 

Not  only  the  External,  but  also  the  Inter- 
nal Portions  of  the  Body  to  Be  Kept 
Pure. — Emptying  Out  of  Waste  Fluids 
and  Solids.— The  Lesson  Taught  by  the 
Fire  in  the  Grate  and  Stove. — The  Fire, 
or  Combustion,  in  Our  Bodies. — Smoke 
and  Perspiration. — Ashes  and  Waste 
Substances  in  the  Body. — Importance 
of  Emptying  Waste  Pipes  of  the  Body 
Regularly, 119 


CYLINDER  XV. 

Slow  Oxidation  Called  Rusting  ; Rapid, 
Called  Burning. — Best  of  Fuel  for  the 
Fire  in  Our  Bodies. — Choice  and  Prep- 
aration of  Food. — Discover  what  Foods 
Do  Not  Agree  with  You.  — Abnormal 
Appetites.  — What  to  Drink. — Danger 
of  All  Stimulants. — The  Ruin  Caused 
by  Intoxicating  Liquors. — The  Danger- 
ous Cigarette. — Tobacco  Universally  and 
Seriously  Injurious  to  Young  Boys. — 
Effect  upon  the  Brain. — Upon  the  Body. 

— Upon  the  Reproductive  Organs,  . 128 

CYLINDER  XVI. 

God  Intended  Man  to  Work.— Many  Seem 
to  Be  Born  Lazy. — All  Must  Learn  to 


CONTENTS. 


II 

PAGE 

Work. — Some  Forms  of  Labor  Call  into 
Service  only  a Few  Muscles. — Every 
Muscle  Should  Do  Service. — Importance 
of  Exercise. — The  Boy’s  Bible  and  Dumb- 
Bells. — The  Muscles  Developed  by  Exer- 
cise.— This  Not  True  of  the  Sexual 
Member. — Importance  of  Recreation. — 
Difference  between  Exercise  and  Recre- 
ation.— This  Illustrated. — So  Much  of 
Zest  and  Pleasure  May  Be  Put  into  Daily 
Duty  as  to  Convert  It  into  Recreation. — 
Daily  Food  and  Daily  Exercise. — Im- 
portance of  Sufficient  Sleep. — The  Best 
Hours  for  Sleep,  . . . . .136 

CYLINDER  XVII. 

Food  and  Exercise  for  the  Mind. — The 
Intellect  May  Be  Starved. — Mind  Fed 
through  the  Eyes,  Ears,  and  other 
Senses. — Mental  Food  Must  Be  Digested 
by  Thinking,  Considering,  and  other 
Mental  Processes. — Clean  Food  for  the 
Mind  as  well  as  the  Body. — The  Mental 
Food  Must  Be  of  a Good  Quality. — 
Unwholesome  Reading. — Good  Read- 
ing.— The  Spiritual  Nature  Must  also 
Be  Fed. — The  Proper  Food. — Six  Impor- 
tant Rules  on  Amusements,  • . 144 


12  CONTENTS. 

PAGE 

PART  V, 

Our  Duty  to  Aid  Others  to  Avoid  Per- 
nicious Habits  and  to  Retain  or  Re- 
gain Their  Purity  and  Strength. 

CYLINDER  XVIII. 

The  Superior  Surroundings  of  Some.— 
Larger  Blessings  Mean  Larger  Respon- 
sibilities.— Our  Duty  to  Those  Who  Are 
Less  Favorably  Situated. — Duty  of  the 
Rescued  to  Those  Still  in  Danger. — 
Many  Sin  Because  Never  Warned. — 
Those  Who  Are  Neglected  Will  Be- 
come Enemies  to  Themselves,  to  So- 
ciety, and  to  the  State. — Bad  Boys  Are 
Active  ; Why  Should  Not  Good  Boys  be 
Active  Also? — Ways  of  Approach  Open 
to  Boys. — Saved  Before  They  Sin. — 
Serving  the  Suffering,  or  Saving  from 
Suffering. — Remove  Danger  from  the 
Paths  of  Others, 153 

PART  VI. 

How  Purity  and  Strength  May  be 
Measurably  Regained. 

CYLINDER  XIX. 

Purity  and  Strength,  How  Regained. — 
Perfection  of  Cure  Dependent  upon  the 
Extent  of  the  Hurt  and  Method  of  the 
Cure. — The  Erring  Have  Much  to  Hope 
for. — Human  Effort  and  Divine  Help. — 
Importance  of  Rules  already  Suggested. 


CONTENTS. 


PAGE 

— Months  and  Years  Needed. — Impor- 
tance of  the  Bath. — Consult  Parents  and 
Competent  Physician. — Unnatural  Mod- 
esty in  These  Matters. — All  Parts  to  be 
Held  in  Purity  of  Thought. — Important 
Suggestions  Concerning  Exercise,  Sleep, 
Diet,  etc. — Seek  Daily  Help  from  God,  161 

PART  VII. 

The  Age  of  Puberty  and  its  Attendant 
Changes. 

CYLINDER  XX. 

The  Passage  from  Infancy  to  Manhood.— 
Physical  and  Mental  Changes  that  Oc- 
cur at  the  Age  of  Puberty. — Meaning  of 
the  Term  “ Puberty.” — The  Dormant  or 
Sleeping  Powers. — They  Awake  and 
Fully  Mature  by  the  Time  We  Need 
Them. — From  Fourteen  to  Twenty-five 
the  Man  is  Maturing. — Prior  to  Puberty 
Boys  and  Girls  Much  Alike  in  Char- 
acteristics.— At  Fourteen  the  Manly 
Characteristics  Begin  to  Develop. — The 
New  and  Embarrassing  Experiences. — 

The  Divinely  Implanted  Nature  Awakes. 

— The  Attendant  Dangers. — How  the 
Boy  Is  Affected. — It  Is  the  Period  of 
“Storm  and  Stress.” — Dangers  which 
Arise  from  Ignorance. — Importance  of 
Intelligence 173 

CYLINDER  XXI. 

The  Last  Talk. — Desire  to  Prepare  You  for 
the  Coming  Manhood. — Purity  Like  the 


CONTENTS, 


Dew. — Boys  Impatient  for  Developing 
Manhood.  — Different  Ages  at  which 
Puberty  Occurs  in  Different  Individuals, 

— Causes  of  Diversity. — Appears  Ear- 
liest in  Diseased  Bodies  and  Latest  in 
the  Healthiest. — Illustrated  in  Diseased 
Fruit. — The  Boys  with  the  Best  Bodily 
Health  Experience  the  Least  Trials  Dur- 
ing the  Developing  Years. — Early  De- 
velopment Means  Early  Decay. — Years 
of  Adolescence  a Period  of  Special  Dan- 
ger.— Our  Parting  Counsel. — Danger  of 
Deferring.  — Immediate  Development 
of  Physical,  Intellectual,  and  Moral 
Powers  of  Utmost  Importance. — “ How 
Shall  We  Escape  if  We  Neglect.” — 
Moral  Nature  Most  Important  of  All. — 
What  Satan  Will  Say. — The  Results  Are 
Inevitable. — Do  Not  Defer. — Covenant 
with  God, i3i 


PREFACE. 


When  himself  a boy,  the  writer  felt 
the  need  of  just  such  a book  as  this. 
In  later  years,  when  a student  in  college, 
and  again  afterward,  when  an  active 
pastor,  he  saw  the  need  of  a clean,  pure, 
but  full-orbed  and  truthful  book  ad- 
dressed to  young  men.  Recognizing 
this  need,  the  writer  resolved,  more  than 
twenty  years  ago,  that  at  some  time  in 
the  future,  if  God  would  fit  him  for  the 
difficult  task,  he  would  consecrate  every 
acquisition  and  talent  to  the  faithful  ac- 
complishment of  this  delicate  undertak- 
ing.  It  was  in  the  fulfillment  of  this  pur- 
pose, which  neither  time  nor  manifold 
divergent  duties  have  ever  obliterated  or 
even  obscured  that,  just  as  the  writer  of 
this  little  book  was  completing  the  manu- 
script for  a book  to  young  men,  the  occa- 
sion arose  for  him  to  prepare  and  present 


l6  PREFACE. 

to  young  boys  the  thought  which  is  em- 
bodied in  this  volume. 

That  there  is  need  for  such  a book 
as  this  no  one  who  remembers  his  own 
childhood,  or  who  has  carefully  observed 
the  childhood  of  to-day,  can  have  a rea- 
sonable doubt.  How  successfully  the 
author  has  accomplished  his  delicate  and 
difficult  task  he  must  leave  others  to 
judge.  Wherein  he  has  failed  he  hopes 
that  others  may  find  that  such  failure  is 
in  no  measure  due  to  the  lack  of  a pure 
and  holy  purpose. 

Parents  and  literary  critics  will  remem- 
ber that  this  book  is  to  young  boys. 
The  language  is  designedly  simple,  and 
in  order  that  this  important  subject 
might  be  more  permanently  impressed 
upon  the  mind,  we  have  not  only  avoided 
such  modes  of  expression  as  might  con- 
ceal instead  of  reveal  our  meaning,  but 
have  purposely  sought,  even  at  the  risk 
of  repetition,  to  recall  at  certain  intervals 
such  cardinal  facts  as  seemed  to  us  neces- 
sary to  be  kept  before  the  mind  for  a 
longer  period. 

This  book  is  designed  to  be  placed  in 
the  hands  of  children  who  are,  per- 


PREFACE. 


17 


chance,  old  enough  to  read  for  them- 
selves, or,  as  in  other  cases,  to  be  read 
by  the  father  or  mother  to  the  child. 
Where  a parent  fears  that  his  child  might 
ask  promiscuous  and  embarrassing  ques- 
tions, it  is  well  to  say  that  such  is  not 
likely  to  be  the  case,  and  if  such  ques- 
tioning should  arise,  it  will  only  be  neces- 
sary to  say  to  the  child  that  if  he  will 
be  patient  until  the  book  is  finished  he 
will  doubtless  have  an  answer  to  every 
proper  question  upon  this  subject. 

While  this  book  is  written  primarily 
to  small  boys,  we  believe  it  will  be  found 
equally  interesting  to  both  men  and 
women,  young  and  old. 

We  cannot  but  feel  that  the  division  of 
our  subject  into  separate  treatises,  suited 
respectively  in  style  and  subject-matter 
to  boys  and  men  in  different  periods  and 
conditions  of  life,  will  be  found  one  of 
the  best  features  which  has  ever  been 
introduced  into  literature  of  this  kind. 
The  mistake  of  placing  in  the  hands  of 
a child  a book  containing  information 
which  is  designed  only  for  grown  per- 
sons is  too  obvious  to  need  any  discus- 
sion. In  this,  as  in  an  educational  series, 


i8 


PREFACE . 


the  later  books  presuppose,  and  are  in 
a large  measure  dependent  upon  the 
acquaintance  of  the  reader  with  those 
which  have  gone  before,  but  an  intelli- 
gent understanding  of  none  of  the  books 
is  dependent  upon  any  other  book  later 
in  the  series. 

In  so  far  as  this  little  book  shall  meet 
the  real  needs  of  boys,  merit  the  hearty 
approval  of  parents,  and  secure  the  rich 
blessing  of  heaven,  the  author  will  have 
attained  the  purpose  which  has  been  his 
inspiration. 

Sylvanus  Stall. 


Philadelphia,  Pa. 


INTRODUCTORY. 


For  a few  moments  each  evening  for 
more  than  a month  Harry  had  been  an 
attentive  listener  to  a chapter  from 
“ Talks  to  the  Kipg’s  Children.”  One 
afternoon  when  he  returned  home  from 
school  he  found  Mamma’s  place  in  the 
nursery  occupied  by  a strange,  elderly 
lady  and  a little  baby,  which  he  was  told 
was  his  baby  sister.  Being  an  intelli- 
gent, thoughtful  boy,  it  was  not  un- 
natural that,  with  his  mingled  feelings  of 
pleasure  and  perplexity,  he  should  steal 
into  his  mother’s  room  and,  when  they 
were  alone,  ask  “ Where  did  Baby  come 
from?  ” 

The  parents  have  turned  to  the  author 
of  Harry’s  books  for  an  answer  to 
Harry’s  question,  and  here  it  is. 


19 


INTRODUCTORY. 


£0 

My  Dear  Friend  Harry:  I have  re- 
ceived your  Mamma’s  note,  asking  me  to 
occupy  her  vacant  place  in  the  nursery 
for  a few  evenings,  and  in  short  Talks 
like  the  “ five  minute  object  sermons  ” 
to  which  you  have  been  listening,  tell 
you  how  God  has  created  all  who  have 
lived  upon  the  earth. 

Distance  and  other  circumstances  ren- 
der it  impossible  for  me  to  come  in  per- 
son, and  your  Papa  has  consented  that 
the  phonograph  ^hall  be  brought  down 
from  his  study  and  placed  in  the  nursery, 
so  that  each  evening  you  may  listen  to 
a Talk,  spoken  into  the  phonograph 
which  I have  in  my  own  study.  So  here 
is  the  first  cylinder.  I shall  endeavor  to 
speak  distinctly,  so  that  you  may  have 
no  trouble  in  understanding,  and  will  try 
to  use  plain,  short  words,  so  that  a boy 
of  your  years  may  know  my  whole  mean- 
ing, and  have  a truthful  and  satisfactory 
answer  to  your  question. 

When  your  Mamma’s  note  came  I was 
engaged  in  writing  a book  to  young  men 
on  somewhat  similar  subjects,  and  your 
question  is,  therefore,  in  sympathy  with 
my  present  thinking. 


INTRODUCTORY. 


21 


I send  the  first  cylinder  with  this  note 
of  explanation.  May  God  bless  you  and 
make  you  a pure  and  good  man! 

Your  Sincere  Friend, 

Sylvanus  Stall. 

Philadelphia,  Pa., 

January  25,  1897. 


PART  L 


God's  Purpose  in  Endowing  Plants,  Animals,  and 
Man  with  Reproductive  Organs. 


WHAT  A YOUNG  BOY 
OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 


CYLINDER  I. 

The  Question  of  the  Origin  of  Life,  Natural 
and  Proper. — To  Go  Back  to  the  Beginning. 
— The  Account  of  Creation  in  Genesis. — 
Difference  Between  Making  and  Creating. 
— God  Created  Everything  out  of  Nothing. — 
From  Some  Objects  God  Withheld  the  Power 
to  Produce  Others. — Upon  Others  He  Be- 
stowed Reproductive  Power. — This  Power 
Closely  Resembles  Creative  Power. 

My  Dear  Friend  Harry:  The  ques- 
tion you  have  asked  is  one  that  every 
man  and  woman,  every  intelligent  boy 
and  girl,  and  even  many  very  young 
children  have  asked  of  themselves  or 
others — whence  and  how  they  came 
to  be  in  the  world?  The  question  is 
both  natural  and  proper,  and  every 
intelligent  person  has  a right  to  ex- 
pect an  answer  that  shall  be  truthful 


25 


26  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW , 

and,  at  the  same  time,  told  in  such 
language  that  the  meaning  can  be  easily 
understood. 

I am  sure  the  boy  is  fortunate  who  has 
had  intelligent  parents  or  kind  friends  to 
give  an  honest  and  satisfactory  answer 
to  his  question,  and  whose  mind  has  been 
saved  from  the  evil  of  those  false  and 
vile  thoughts  that  are  so  general  and 
common  among  ignorant  men  and  boys. 

If  you  were  to  ask  where  the  locomo- 
tive and  the  steamship,  or  the  telegraph 
and  the  telephone  come  from,  it  would 
seem  to  us  wisest,  in  order  that  you 
might  have  the  largest  understanding  of 
the  subject  and  the  fullest  and  most  satis- 
factory answer,  that  we  should  go  back 
to  the  beginning  of  these  things,  and 
consider  what  was  done  by  George 
Stephenson  and  Robert  Fulton,  by  Ben- 
jamin Franklin  and  Robert  Morse,  by 
Graham  Bell  and  Thomas  Edison  toward 
developing  and  perfecting  these  useful 
inventions.  In  this  way  we  are  sure  the 
most  intelligent  and  complete  under- 
standing of  the  entire  subject  could  be 
secured. 

In  order  that  we  may,  in  like  manner, 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  27 

have  the  best  understanding  of  the 
answer  to  the  question,  “ Where  did  we 
come  from?  ” let  us,  in  the  same  way, 
go  back  and  ask  where  did  Adam,  the 
first  man,  and  Eve,  the  first  woman, 
come  from?  Of  course  you  already 
know  that  God  created  Adam  and  Eve. 
You  have  read  the  beautiful  and  won- 
derful account  given  on  the  first  page 
of  the  Bible;  but  there  are  many  things 
in  this  wonderful  account  in  the  book 
of  Genesis  which  you  have  doubtless 
overlooked.  Let  us  for  a few  moments 
study  this  account  together. 

If  we  start  with  the  first  verse  we  are 
told  that,  “ In  the  beginning  God  created 
the  heavens  and  the  earth.”  Now  there 
is  a great  difference  between  creating 
and  making  anything.  When  a car- 
penter builds,  or  makes  a house  or  a 
barn,  he  simply  brings  together  boards, 
bricks,  shingles,  laths,  nails,  and  other 
things,  and  with  these  he  erects  the 
building;  but  when  it  is  all  completed 
he  has  not  created  anything.  He  has 
simply  taken  those  things  which  pre- 
viously existed,  and  so  changed  their 
form  and  combined  them  as  to  make 


28  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

what  we  call  a building.  In  other  words, 
he  has  built  a building.  He  has  created 
nothing,  but  he  has  made  something. 

With  God  it  was  not  so.  In  the  be- 
ginning, when  God  created  everything, 
there  were  no  rocks,  no  ground,  no  ma- 
terials of  any  kind  with  which  He  could 
build  or  make  the  world,  or  anything 
else.  But  God's  power  and  wisdom  were 
without  limit,  and  instead  of  using  ma- 
terials, or  even  needing  materials  to 
accomplish  His  purpose,  He  simply  com- 
manded, and  it  was  done.  There  was 
endless  and  dense  darkness,  and  God 
simply  said  “ Let  there  be  light;  and 
there  was  light."  On  the  second  day 
God  created  the  firmament,  or  the  blue 
expanse  above  us,  and  so,  for  six  days, 
God  went  on  creating  all  that  exists 
upon  the  earth,  all  that  swims  in  the  seas, 
that  flies  in  the  air,  and  that  shines  in  the 
sky. 

To  some  of  the  works  of  His  creation 
God  gave  the  power  to  beget  or  produce 
others  like  themselves.  Such  objects 
learned  men  call  organic  objects.  From 
some  others,  which  learned  men  call  in- 
organic objects,  such  as  the  sun,  moon, 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  29 

stars,  rocks,  mountains,  oceans,  and  the 
like,  God  withheld  that  power  to  produce 
others.  These  latter  are  to  abide  until 
God  shall  destroy  them,  and  hence  it  was 
not  necessary  that  they  should  have 
given  to  them  power  to  produce  others 
like  themselves.  If  other  worlds  should 
be  needed,  God  prefers  to  create  them 
Himself.  But  the  other  objects,  which 
learned  men  call  organic  objects,  the 
things  which  have  life,  such  as  plants, 
trees,  fishes,  birds,  animals,  and  men, 
these  do  not  abide  or  remain  continu- 
ally, but  live  only  for  a time  and  then 
die  and  pass  away. 

Now  when  this  is  the  case,  God  could 
from  time  to  time  create  others  to  take 
their  places,  and  thus  cause  that  life 
should  continue  upon  the  earth.  But 
God  saw  a wiser  and  better  way,  and  in 
infinite  wisdom  and  love  He  gave  to  all 
the  objects  and  creatures  which  He 
created,  and  which  He  endowed  with  life, 
the  power  to  beget  and  reproduce  others 
like  themselves.  It  was  not  power  to 
create  as  God  had  Himself  so  wonder- 
fully and  mysteriously  done;  but  it  was 
a power  which  in  some  respects  resem* 


30  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

bles  it  very  closely,  and  which  in  its 
deepest  mystery  the  wisest  men  have 
never  yet  been  able  fully  to  understand 
or  explain.  It  was  a power  to  impart 
life;  to  beget  and  to  produce  others 
like  themselves. 

This,  Harry,  is  the  wonderful  subject 
which  you  and  I have  set  ourselves 
reverently  to  study.  In  order  that  we 
may  have  an  intelligent  and  satisfactory 
answer  to  the  question,  “ Where  did  we 
and  each  person  who  lives  upon  the 
earth  come  from?”  it  will  be  necessary 
to  study  the  Bible  account  of  creation 
a little  more  in  detail,  and  this  we  will  do 
to-morrow  night. 


CYLINDER  II. 


The  Creation  of  Plants,  Animals,  and  Man, 
Each  after  His  Kind. — How  God  Created 
Adam  and  Eve. — The  Bible  Account. — Re- 
productive Power  Ordained  of  God. — God 
Would  Not  Make  a Law  that  Had  Impurity 
in  It. — If  We  Do  Not  Blush  at  the  Manner  in 
Which  God  Created  Adam  and  Eve,  Neither 
Should  We  at  the  Manner  in  Which  He 
Created  Cain  and  Abel. — Thinking  God’s 
Pure  Thoughts  after  Him. — Reproductive 
Resembles  Creative  Power. 

My  Dear  Friend  Harry:  I want  to 
talk  to  you  to-night  about  how  in  the 
beginning  God  created  Adam  and  Eve, 
and  ordained  that  the  life  of  plants,  ani- 
mals, and  man  should  be  perpetuated 
Now  if  we  turn  again  to  the  first  chapter 
of  Genesis,  we  find  that  on  the  third  day 
God  created  the  grass  and  herbs,  “ Each 
yielding  seed,  and  the  fruit  tree  yielding 
fruit  after  his  kind,  whose  seed  is  in 
itself.”  On  the  fifth  day  He  created  the 
fishes  and  birds,  “ and  God  blessed  them 
saying,  Be  fruitful,  and  multiply.”  And 


32  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW \ 

on  the  sixth  day  He  created  “ Cattle  and 
creeping  things,  and  beasts  of  the  earth, 
after  his  kind.”  And  last  of  all,  in  the 
work  of  creation,  God  also  created  man. 

Now  if  we  take  the  different  verses 
from  the  first  and  second  chapters  of 
Genesis,  and  bring  them  together  in  a 
continuous  account,  the  history  of  man’s 
creation  in  God’s  own  words  will  read: 
“ God  said,  Let  us  make  man  in  our 
image,  after  our  likeness,  and  let  them 
have  dominion  over  the  fish  of  the  sea, 
and  over  the  fowl  of  the  air,  and  over  the 
cattle,  and  over  all  the  earth,  and  over 
every  creeping  thing  that  creepeth  upon 
the  earth.  And  the  Lord  God  formed 
man  of  the  dust  of  the  ground,  and 
breathed  into  his  nostrils  the  breath  of 
life;  and  man  became  a living  soul.  And 
the  Lord  God  planted  a garden  eastward 
in  Eden;  and  there  He  put  the  man  whom 
He  had  formed.  And  the  Lord  God 
said,  It  is  not  good  that  the  man  should 
be  alone;  I will  make  him  a help  meet 
for  him.  And  the  Lord  God  caused  a 
deep  sleep  to  fall  upon  Adam,  and  he 
slept;  and  He  took  one  of  his  ribs,  and 
closed  up  the  flesh  instead  thereof.  And 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  33 

the  rib,  which  the  Lord  God  had  taken 
from  man,  made  He  a woman,  and 
brought  her  unto  the  man.  And  Adam 
said,  This  is  now  bone  of  my  bones,  and 
flesh  of  my  flesh:  she  shall  be  called 
Woman,  because  she  was  taken  out  of 
man.  Therefore  shall  a man  leave  his 
father  and  his  mother,  and  shall  cleave 
unto  his  wife:  and  they  shall  be  one 
flesh.  So  God  created  man  in  His  own 
image,  in  the  image  of  God  created 
He  him;  male  and  female  created  He 
them.  And  God  blessed  them,  and 
God  said  unto  them,  Be  fruitful,  and 
multiply,  and  replenish  the  earth,  and 
subdue  it:  and  have  dominion  over  the 
fish  of  the  sea,  and  over  the  fowl  of  the 
air,  and  over  every  living  thing  that 
moveth  upon  the  earth.” 

I am  sure,  my  dear  boy,  that  you  will 
agree  with  me  that  this  is  a very  beauti- 
ful account,  and  in  it  we  have  a revela- 
tion of  God's  mind  and  method  of  raising 
up  or  producing  others  to  take  the 
places  of  all  the  plants,  trees,  fishes, 
birds,  animals,  and  men  which  God  had 
created  upon  the  earth,  but  which  would 
all,  in  a few  years,  die  and  pass  away. 


34  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

This  law  or  method  by  which  parent 
plants  and  animals  beget,  or  raise  up, 
infant  plants  and  animals,  like  them- 
selves, to  occupy  their  places,  and  thus 
continue  life  upon  the  earth  after  they 
are  dead  and  gone,  we  are  here  clearly 
taught  was  instituted  or  ordained  by 
God  himself,  and  we  know  that  God 
would  not  make  a law  that  had  impurity 
in  it. 

Now  we  do  not  blush  or  regard  it  im- 
pure to  study  the  wonderful  wisdom  and 
power  which  God  displayed  in  the  crea- 
tion of  Adam  and  Eve.  Neither  should 
we,  when  we  think  properly  of  the  no 
less  wonderful  and  mysterious  manner 
in  which  God  created  Cain  and  Abel, 
their  children,  and  in  which  He  still  is 
from  day  to  day  and  year  to  year,  raising 
up  a new  generation  to  take  the  places 
of  their  parents,  when  they  shall  have 
died  and  passed  away.  If  we  remember 
that  no  impure  thought  ever  entered 
into  the  mind  of  our  dear  heavenly 
Father,  when  He  was  thinking  of  these 
things,  and  when  engaged  in  the  work 
of  creation,  we  will  clearly  understand 
that  all  wrong  thinking  or  acting  upon 


WHA  T A YOUNG,  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  35 

this  subject,  which  should  be  as  pure 
and  sacred  to  our  minds  as  any  other 
sacred  subject,  comes  from  Satan,  and 
not  from  God.  If  we  truly  realize  this 
we  shall  then  be  in  the  proper  frame  of 
mind  to  ask  God  that  we  may,  upon  this 
subject,  think  His  thoughts  after  Him,  in 
the  same  pure  way  that  He  thought  them 
at  the  time  of  the  creation,  and  before 
the  creation,  and  since  the  creation.  If 
we  get  our  thoughts  from  God,  they  will 
be  pure,  and  if  we  get  them  from  Satan 
they  will  be  impure.  In  itself  the  sub- 
ject is  pure,  and  we  should  bring  to 
its  consideration  a reverent  and  devout 
mind. 

You  will  have  noticed  in  this  account 
that  God  gave  to  plants,  trees,  and  every 
living  creature,  the  power  to  produce 
others,  each  of  their  own  kind.  Had 
they  not  been  thus  limited  or  restricted, 
peaches  might  have  grown  upon  apple 
trees,  and  chestnuts  might  have  grown 
upon  currant  bushes.  Neither  were  they 
permitted  to  exercise  creative  power  as 
God  had  done,  else  trees  might  have 
created  fishes  or  birds,  and  birds  might 
have  created  trees  or  animals,  according 


36  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

to  pleasure.  But  each  was  given  power 
to  produce  and  perpetuate  his  own  kind 
by  bearing  “ Seed  after  his  kind.”  On 
this  account  apple  seeds,  when  properly 
planted,  always  produce  apple  trees,  and 
peach  seeds  always  produce  peach  trees, 
and  so  on  through  all  the  forms  of  life 
and  being.  So  God  endowed  plants  and 
animals,  and  every  living  creature,  not 
with  creative  power,  but  with  another 
power  which  in  some  respects,  as  we 
have  said,  resembles  it  very  closely,  and 
which,  because  each  produces  seed  after 
its  own  kind,  and  from  these  seeds  grow 
up  or  are  produced  baby  plants  which 
are  like  the  parent  plants,  we  call  this 
power,  not  creative  power,  but  repro- 
ductive power. 

The  manner  in  which  this  power  is 
seen  in  plants,  I shall  try  to  tell  you  on 
the  next  cylinder. 


CYLINDER  III. 


Father,  Mother,  and  Baby  Plants. — “ Male  and 
Female  Created  He  Them.” — The  Father  and 
Mother  Natures  in  the  Same  Stalk. — Seen 
only  at  Maturity  of  Stalk  in  the  Production 
of  the  Seed. — Seen  in  the  Cornfield. — The 
Ears  with  the  Silk  the  Female,  and  the 
Tassels  with  the  Pollen  the  Male  Manifesta- 
tion.— The  Father  and  Mother  Natures 
Sometimes  Separated. — The  Pollen  Carried 
by  the  Wind  and  Insects. — Were  God  to 
Destroy  the  Reproductive  Power  of  Plants 
and  Trees,  all  Vegatable  Life  Would  Disap- 
pear and  Animals  and  Men  Would  Die  of 
Starvation. 

My  Dear  Friend  Harry:  At  the 
close  of  my  little  Talk  to  you  in  the  pho- 
nograph last  evening,  I spoke  of  the 
young  plant  that  grows  up  from  the  seed 
which  is  planted  in  the  ground,  and  I 
called  it,  the  “ baby  plant.”  A plant  is 
just  as  truly  a child  of  its  parents  as  the 
little  birds  in  the  nest  are  the  children  of 
the  parent  birds  which  built  the  nest, 
hatched  out  the  baby  birds,  and  afterward 


37 


38  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW, 

watched  over  and  fed  them  so  tenderly. 
In  the  case  of  the  birds  you  may  have 
noticed  that  there  were  two  parent  birds, 
the  father  bird  and  the  mother  bird. 
But  in  the  account  of  the  creation  in  the 
book  of  Genesis,  you  may  have  failed  to 
notice  the  full  meaning  in  the  place 
where  it  tells  of  the  different  living 
things  which  God  created,  and  it  says, 
“ Male  and  female  created  He  them.” 
This  fact  you  doubtless  have  noticed 
with  animals,  and  possibly  with  birds,  but 
you  may  not  have  thought  that  God  de- 
signed that  each  baby  plant  should  also 
have  both  a father  and  a mother,  and 
that  concerning  plants  it  is  also  true, 
“ male  and  female  created  He  them.” 
Such,  however,  is  the  real  fact. 

In  some  plants,  the  father  and  the 
mother  natures  dwell  together  in  the 
same  parent  stalk,  but  are  seen  in  their 
separate  father  and  mother  natures  only 
when  the  period  of  full  growth  and  ma- 
turity has  come  in  the  life  of  the  plant, 
and  seed  is  to  be  produced,  so  that,  later 
on,  when  the  parent  plant  shall  wither 
and  die,  other  young  plants  may  spring 
up  from  the  seed,  and  thus,  although 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  39 

the  parent  plant  has  died  and  passed 
away,  yet  by  means  of  the  seed,  the  life 
of  that  kind  of  plant  is  preserved  and 
continued  upon  the  earth. 

The  manner  in  which  these  father  and 
mother  natures  are  united,  and  yet  show 
themselves  separately  in  the  work  of 
forming  the  seed  from  which  the  baby 
plant  is  afterward  to  grow,  is  perhaps 
most  easily  seen  in  a field  where  corn,  or 
what  English  boys  call  Indian  corn  is 
growing.  After  the  stalk  is  grown  to 
its  full  height,  and  the  ears  have  begun 
to  form,  and  spread  out  that  fine  silk 
which  you  have  no  doubt  noticed  at  the 
upper  ends  of  the  ears,  at  the  same  time 
there  also  appeared  upon  the  top  of  the 
stalk  a great  number  of  blossoms,  which 
boys  generally  call  tassels.  Now  these 
ears,  with  their  husks,  out  of  which  hang 
the  silk,  are  the  mother,  or  the  female 
manifestations  of  the  plant,  and  the 
tassels  with  their  blossoms  covered  with 
pollen,  or  flower  dust,  are  the  father  or 
male  manifestations  of  the  plant.  When  a 
gentle  breeze  shakes  the  corn  stalk,  and 
the  pollen,  or  fine  flower  dust  falls  from 
the  tassels  upon  the  silk,  it  is  carried  by 


40  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW . 

separate  threads  of  silk  to  each  separate 
kernel,  and  in  this  way  each  grain 
growing  upon  the  entire  stalk  has  im- 
parted to  it  that  principle  of  life,  without 
which  it  could  never  become  a grain  of 
corn. 

In  all  plants,  the  father  and  mother 
natures  are  manifested  in  the  flower,  and 
are  seen  in  the  blossoms  upon  the  trees 
and  the  roses  upon  the  bushes.  In  some 
instances  the  two  natures,  as  in  the  case 
of  corn,  are  united  in  the  same  tree  or 
bush;  while  in  others,  the  father  and 
mother  natures  live  in  separate  trees  or 
in  separate  bushes.  When  they  are 
found  together  in  the  same  flower,  the 
pollen,  or  flower  dust  from  the  male 
anthers  is  easily  conveyed  to  the  female 
stigma,  and  thus  passes  down  the  style, 
or  stem,  to  the  pod,  which  is  hidden 
away  beneath  the  beautiful  leaves  of  the 
flower,  where  the  seeds,  after  being 
made  by  the  pollen  to  have  the  principle 
of  life,  are  to  grow  to  maturity.  In  some 
cases,  the  male  and  female  natures  are 
found  in  separate  blossoms  or  flowers, 
sometimes  on  the  same  branch,  and  at 
other  times  upon  separate  branches  of 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  4* 


the  same  plant.  In  other  instances,  they 
grow  only  upon  separate  trees,  and  these 
papa  and  mamma  trees  with  their  blos- 
soms may  be  growing,  not  close  to- 
gether, but  widely  apart  from  each  other, 
separated  sometimes  as  far  as  you  can 
throw  a stone,  and  at  other  times  with 
broad  fields  lying  between  them,  or  even 
several  miles  apart.  Where  they  are 
separated  by  some  distance,  the  pollen, 
or  flower  dust  of  the  male,  or  father 
blossom,  is  carried  to  the  blossoms  of 
the  female,  or  mother  plant  by  the  wind 
and  by  bees  and  other  insects  which 
have  no  thought  of  doing  the  blossoms 
this  kind  service,  but  are  only  anxious 
and  intent  on  gathering  honey  to  be 
stored  away  for  their  winter  food. 

By  what  I have  said  you  will  under- 
stand something  of  the  wisdom  which 
God  displayed,  when  in  the  beginning 
He  created  plants  and  trees,  each  “Yield- 
ing seed  after  his  kind,”  and  also  how 
God  is  to-day  reproducing,  perpetuating, 
and  distributing  the  life  of  every  herb, 
every  blade  of  grass,  of  every  flower  and 
of  every  tree,  to  take  the  places  of  those 
herbs,  plants,  and  trees,  which  are  soon 


42  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

to  wither,  die,  and  pass  away.  If  God 
were  to  withhold  from  all  forms  of  plants 
and  trees  the  power  to  exercise  this 
wonderful  reproductive  power  with 
which  He  has  endowed  them,  only  a few 
years  at  most  would  pass  away,  until 
every  green  thing  would  have  died  and 
perished  from  the  earth,  and  there  would 
be  no  flowers  or  fruit,  no  grain  or  food 
of  any  kind,  and  famine  and  death  would 
sweep  every  bird  and  beast,  and  even 
man  himself,  from  the  face  of  the  entire 
earth. 

Thus,  Harry,  you  will  see  that  by 
thinking  of  these  things  in  the  same  pure 
way  which  God  shows  us  in  the  Bible, 
we  are  coming,  step  by  step,  to  the  full 
and  satisfactory  answer  to  the  question 
which  you  asked  of  your  dear  Mamma 
when  you  came  home  the  other  evening 
and  found  your  innocent,  sweet  baby 
sister  lying  in  the  cradle. 

To-morrow  night,  I will  tell  you  how 
God  provided  that  every  baby  fish,  and 
bird,  and  baby  animal,  should  also  have 
a papa  and  mamma. 


CYLINDER  IV. 


Plant  Life  Perpetuated  by  Reproduction.— 
Organic  Life  Divided  into  Sentient,  or  Feel- 
ing, and  Non-feeling  Beings. — Sentient  Be- 
ings Produce  Eggs  Instead  of  Seeds. — The 
Papa  and  Mamma  Natures  United  in  the 
Oyster. — The  Early  Life  of  the  Baby  Oyster. 
—The  Papa  and  Mamma  Natures  Separated 
in  Fishes. — The  Female  Fish  Lays  the  Eggs  : 
the  Male  Fish  Fertilizes  Them  with  a Fluid 
While  Swimming  over  the  Eggs. — The  Fishes 
Are  Hatched  by  the  Action  of  the  Water  and 
Warmth  of  the  Sun. — Baby  Oysters  and 
Fishes  are  Orphans. 

My  Dear  Friend  Harry:  On  the 
former  cylinders  I tried  to  tell  you,  as 
you  will  remember,  how  that  when  God 
created  the  sun,  moon,  stars,  rocks, 
mountains,  seas,  and  all  such  things  as 
learned  men  call  inorganic  objects  He  did 
not  give  them  power  to  produce  others 
like  themselves,  but  reserved  to  himself 
the  power  either  to  destroy,  or  to  create 
others,  as  He  might  deem  best.  I told 
you  also  how  that  among  herbs,  trees, 


43 


44  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

and  all  objects  which  have  life,  and 
which  learned  men  call  organic  objects, 
God  gave  the  power  to  produce  others 
like  themselves,  but  these  new  products 
were  to  begin  life  as  infants.  In  the  in' 
stance  of  all  plants,  vegetables,  and  grain, 
this  process  goes  on  repeating  itself. 
Starting  with  the  plant,  of  each  kind, 
which  God  created,  there  was  next  the 
blossom  or  flower,  then  the  fruit  or  seed, 
and  these  seeds  in  turn  producing  other 
similar  infant  plants,  and  these  when 
grown,  in  their  turn  also  blossomed  and 
produced  seeds,  and  so  on  from  the  first, 
the  process  repeating  itself  down  to  the 
present;  each  plant  and  tree  preparing 
the  way  for  the  continuation  of  its  own 
life  in  the  plant  or  tree  which  was  to 
come  after  it,  and  so  on  and  on,  through 
all  the  years  to  the  end  of  time. 

By  recalling  these  things  we  shall  be 
prepared,  to-night,  on  this  cylinder,  to 
go  one  step  further.  Now  the  forms  of 
organic  life,  for  simplicity  and  con- 
venience, are  divided  into  two  classes. 
One  class,  because  they  have  nerves  and 
some  one  or  more  of  the  five  senses  of 
hearing,  seeing,  smelling,  tasting,  and 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  45 

feeling  are  called  sentient  or  feeling 
beings.  The  other  class,  composed  of 
such  objects  as  plants  and  trees,  which 
we  have  already  considered,  and  which 
have  no  nerves,  and  do  not  have  any  of 
the  five  senses,  are  called  non-sentient  or 
not-feeling  beings. 

When  we  come  to  birds,  fishes,  and 
all  kinds  of  animals,  instead  of  the  papa 
and  mamma  natures  uniting  in  the  pro- 
duction of  seeds,  as  is  the  case  in  plants, 
they  unite  in  producing  an  egg.  Some 
eggs,  like  those  of  birds,  are  covered 
with  a shell,  but  that  is  not  the  case  with 
all  eggs.  Instead  of  the  papa  nature, 
producing  pollen,  as  in  plants,  in  creat- 
ures that  have  nerves,  a watery  fluid 
takes  the  place  of  the  pollen,  and  this  is 
imparted  to  that  portion  of  the  egg 
which  the  mamma  parent  produces  in 
various  ways,  as  we  shall  see  presently. 

First  let  us  take  the  oyster,  which  can 
neither  hear,  see,  smell,  nor  possibly 
taste,  and  because  it  has  only  the  single 
sense  of  feeling  is  regarded  as  one  of  the 
lowest  in  the  scale  of  development  of  all 
the  sentient  beings ; and  we  will  find  that, 
like  most  of  the  plants,  both  the  father 


46  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

and  mother  natures  dwell  together  in 
the  person  of  a single  oyster,  and  while 
the  egg  is  being  formed  in  the  body  of 
the  parent  oyster,  the  father  and  mother 
each  contribute  their  part,  so  as  to  pro- 
duce what  is  called  a fertile  egg,  or  one 
that  will  produce  a baby  oyster.  When 
these  eggs  are  fully  formed,  which 
occurs  in  the  spring  of  the  year,  they  are 
expelled  from  the  body  of  the  parent 
oyster,  and  float  about  in  the  water  until 
they  rest  against  a rock,  the  shell  of  a 
large  oyster,  or  some  other  hard  sub- 
stance, to  which  they  at  once  lay  hold, 
and  immediately  the  shell,  which  consti- 
tutes both  the  oyster’s  house  and  cloth- 
ing, begins  to  grow  and  forms  about  its 
little  body. 

With  fish,  it  is  different.  When  God 
created  the  fishes,  He  gave  the  mamma 
nature  a separate  body  of  its  own, 
and  he  also  gave  the  papa  nature 
a separate  body  of  its  own.  So  the  baby 
fish,  like  baby  boys  and  girls,  has  two 
parents;  one  the  mamma  fish,  and  the 
other  the  papa  fish. 

I suppose  that  in  the  spring  of  the 
year,  when  Mamma  has  ordered  a large 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  47 

shad  sent  home,  and  Bridget  was  clean- 
ing it,  you  may  have  noticed  that  its 
body  was  filled  with  thousands  of  eggs. 
These  are  often  cooked  with  the  fish,  and 
are  called  “ roes.”  Now  during  most  of 
the  year,  these  shad  live  in  deep  sea- 
water, and  in  the  spring  when  their 
bodies  are  thus  full  of  the  eggs  which 
have  formed  during  the  year,  all  the  shad 
leave  their  regular  home,  and  swim  into 
the  bays,  or  sometimes  hundreds  of  miles 
up  the  river,  until  they  find  some  quiet, 
safe,  and  suitable  place  where  the 
mamma  fishes  may  lay  their  eggs,  or 
“ spawn,”  as  it  is  called.  It  is  while  on 
this  journey  up  the  rivers  in  the  spring 
of  the  year,  that  many  of  the  shad 
are  caught  by  fishermen  in  great  nets. 
On  this  journey,  the  mamma  fishes  are 
accompanied  by  the  papa  fishes,  and 
when  the  suitable  place  which  they  are 
seeking  is  found,  the  mamma  fishes  ex- 
pel from  their  bodies  those  thousands  of 
eggs,  which  are  at  the  same  time  accom- 
panied by  and  float  in  a slimy  substance 
that  very  much  resembles  the  white  por- 
tion of  a raw  hen’s  egg.  After  the 
mamma  fish  has  thus  laid  her  eggs,  the 


48  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

papa  fish  swims  gently  over  the  eggs,  at 
the  same  time  expelling  from  his  body 
a slimy  substance  which  also  resembles 
the  white  portion  of  a raw  hen's  egg.  In 
this  way  the  eggs  are  fertilized,  the  same 
as  the  grains  of  corn  are  fertilized  by 
having  the  pollen,  or  flower  dust,  fall 
upon  the  silk  at  the  end  of  the  ear,  and 
which  is  carried  by  the  silk  threads  down 
under  the  husk  to  each  separate  grain  of 
corn  on  the  stalk. 

After  the  eggs  of  the  fishes  have  been 
thus  deposited  in  the  water  where  the 
conditions  are  favorable,  the  parents  go 
away,  and  never  see,  or  at  least  never 
know  their  baby  fishes,  which  are 
hatched  in  a few  days  by  the  motion  of 
the  water  and  the  warmth  of  the  sun. 
Both  baby  fishes  and  baby  oysters  are 
little  orphans  from  the  very  beginning. 

So  you  see  where  the  baby  fishes 
come  from,  and  to-morrow  evening,  I 
will  tell  you  about  baby  birds  and  baby 
animals. 


CYLINDER  V. 


How  Seeds  Are  Made  to  Grow. — How  Eggs 
Are  Hatched. — The  Habits  of  Parent  Birds 
While  Hatching. — The  Beautiful  Lessons 
They  Teach. — The  Dangers  to  which  Little 
Birds  Are  Exposed. — Their  Return  from 
Sunny  Climes  to  Build  Nests  of  Their  Own. 
— Animals  Next  in  the  Order  of  Creation. — 
Reasons  Why  Animals  Do  Not  Lay  Eggs. — 
The  Egg  Retained  in  the  Body  of  the  Mother 
Animal. — Her  Body  Marvelously  Furnished. 
— After  Sufficient  Growth  the  Young  Animal 
is  Born. — After  Birth,  Still  Nourished  from 
the  Mother’s  Body. — Weaned  when  the 
Teeth  Grow. — Lowest  Animals  Reach 
Bodily  Maturity  Soonest. — Man  Highest  in 
the  Scale  of  Being. — Longest  of  All  in 
Reaching  Maturity. — Value  of  Childhood 
Years. 

My  Dear  Friend  Harry:  I prom- 
ised to  tell  you  to-night  about  baby  birds 
and  baby  animals.  In  the  spring  of  the 
year  you  have  gone  with  Mamma  into 
the  garden  and  seen  her  plant  the  seeds 
of  flowers  and  vegetables.  After  she 
dropped  these  seeds,  she  covered  them 
carefully  so  that  the  moisture  of  the 


49 


50  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

earth  and  the  warmth  of  the  sun  might 
waken  the  life  which  was  dormant  or 
sleeping  in  the  seeds,  and  in  which  the 
infant  plants  were  all  enfolded  ready  to 
awake  and  grow  up,  first  into  baby 
plants,  and  then  into  big  plants. 

When  you  have  seen  the  little  eggs  in 
the  nest  which  the  birds  built  in  the  tree 
near  your  window,  did  it  occur  to  you 
that  these  were  the  seeds  out  of  which 
should  come  new  birds.  Such,  in  fact, 
however,  the  eggs  really  are.  But  instead 
of  being  placed  in  the  earth  like  the  seeds 
of  plants,  the  parent  birds  build  a nest 
where  they  can  sit  on  the  eggs,  impart 
to  them  the  warmth  of  their  own  bodies, 
and  thus  quicken  or  awaken  the  life 
which  is  in  the  eggs,  so  that  the  bodies 
of  the  little  birds  might  form  and  grow 
as  God  has  ordained.  In  this  way,  after 
two  or  three  weeks,  when  the  birds  are 
grown  large  enough,  the  shell  breaks 
open,  and  the  tiny  little  birds  are  then 
born,  or  hatched,  as  we  say. 

If  you  have  carefully  watched  the  two 
parent  birds  during  the  weeks  while  the 
little  birds  were  being  hatched,  you  will 
have  noticed  that  the  mamma  bird  pre- 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  51 

fers  to  sit  most  of  the  time  on  the  eggs 
and  keep  them  warm,  but  all  the  while 
the  papa  bird  has  stayed  close  by,  com- 
ing often  to  sit  on  a branch  near  the 
nest,  and  chirp  and  sing,  and  thus  cheer 
and  keep  the  mamma  bird  company, 
then  he  would  fly  away,  and  after  a little 
time  return,  carrying  in  his  beak  a 
worm,  or  some  choice  bit  of  food  which 
he  had  found,  and  flying  up  to  the  nest, 
feed  it  lovingly  to  the  mamma  bird.  At 
times,  when  the  mamma  bird  was  tired, 
they  would  both  fly  away  together,  and 
after  a few  moments,  the  papa  bird 
would  hurry  back  to  take  the  mamma 
bird’s  place,  and  keep  the  eggs  warm 
and  guard  them  from  harm,  while  the 
mamma  bird  would  take  such  rest  and 
recreation  as  she  needed  or  wished. 

The  home  life  of  two  such  parent  birds 
is  very  devoted  and  sweet,  and  no  man 
or  boy  can  watch  it  without  learning 
from  the  birds  lessons  of  love  and 
fidelity. 

While  the  little  birds  are  growing,  the 
parent  birds  unite  in  hunting  food,  and 
after  the  baby  birds  have  attained  some 
size,  and  their  feathers  are  grown,  then 


52  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

the  parent  birds  have  an  anxious  time, 
lest  the  ambitious  little  birds  too  soon 
attempt  to  fly,  only  to  fall  on  the 
ground  and  be  caught  by  the  cat,  or  die 
after  a period  of  mishaps  and  misfor- 
tunes. If  the  little  birds  are  only  patient, 
they  will,  in  due  time,  fly  safely  from  tree 
to  tree,  and  after  spending  the  summer 
in  the  neighborhood  of  their  babyhood 
home,  will  then  fly  away  to  spend  the 
winter  in  a warm  clime,  and  if  not  shot 
by  some  heartless  and  cruel  man  or  boy 
who  is  gunning,  they  will  return  the 
next  spring  fully  grown  and  matured, 
and  with  their  own  mates  will  also  take 
their  places  in  the  reproductive  world, 
and  as  God  has  ordained  in  this  succes- 
sion of  life,  build  nests  for  themselves 
and  their  mates  in  the  neighboring  trees, 
and  raise  up  for  themselves  a brood  of 
baby  birds. 

Now  next  in  the  order  and  scale 
of  creation  come  the  animals.  Ani- 
mals do  not  lay  eggs  like  birds,  and 
for  good  reasons.  You  remember 
how  it  is  with  the  fishes.  Many  pro- 
duce thousands  of  eggs  in  a single 
season.  Some  codfish  have  been 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  53 

known  to  contain  as  many  as  sixteen  or 
twenty  millions  of  eggs  at  one  time. 
Many  of  these  eggs,  after  having  been 
laid,  because  of  unfavorable  conditions, 
may  never  hatch,  and  of  such  as  are 
hatched,  vast  multitudes  of  them  are  de- 
voured by  the  larger  fish,  for  fish  are 
cannibals,  and  eat  their  own  kind.  The 
eggs  of  birds  are  also  exposed  to  various 
forms  of  danger  and  destruction,  as  in 
the  case  of  ducks,  geese,  and  chickens, 
whose  eggs  are  one  of  the  forms  of  food 
designed  to  sustain  human  life. 

To  prevent  such  loss,  and  to  accom- 
plish other  beneficent  ends,  when  we 
come  to  the  higher  forms  of  life,  we 
find  that  instead  of  laying  the  eggs  in  a 
nest,  and  then  sitting  upon  them  until 
the  young  are  hatched,  with  animals,  the 
egg,  after  being  fertilized  by  the  sexual 
contact  of  the  male,  is  retained  in  the 
body  of  the  mother.  Here,  in  a portion 
of  her  body,  which  God  has  marvel- 
ously fashioned  and  furnished  for  that 
purpose,  changes  similar  to  those  which 
occur  in  the  egg  while  the  mother  bird 
is  sitting  upon  it  take  place  in  the  devel- 
opment and  growth  of  the  egg  while  it 


54  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

yet  remains  in  the  body  of  the  mother 
animal.  After  a time,  varying  from  a 
few  months  to  an  entire  year,  as  when 
the  little  chick,  after  having  attained 
sufficient  development,  breaks  the  shell 
and  comes  forth  to  begin  its  own  inde- 
pendent life,  so  the  egg  or  germ  which 
has  been  retained  in  the  body  of  the 
mother  animal,  when  it  is  developed  and 
grown  sufficiently  to  live  its  own  sepa- 
rate and  independent  life,  comes  forth 
from  its  mother’s  body,  and  is  born, 
as  we  say.  Until  the  time  that  it  is 
born,  it  is  nourished  within  the  body  of 
the  mother,  but  after  it  is  born,  God  still 
supplies  the  nourishment  from  the  body 
of  the  mother,  but  no  longer  upon  the 
inner  side  of  the  mother’s  body,  but 
upon  the  outside  of  her  body,  where  the 
young  obtain  it  in  the  form  of  milk. 

In  this  way,  the  young  animal  is  usu- 
ally fed  for  a few  weeks,  after  which  it 
is  furnished  with  teeth,  and  is  then 
weaned,  as  we  say.  After  it  is  weaned, 
it  enters  upon  a further  stage  of  growth, 
requiring,  as  it  is  higher  or  lower  in  the 
scale  of  being,  months  or  even  years  to 
attain  its  full  growth  and  maturity.  ;The 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  55 

lower  in  the  scale  of  being,  the  briefer 
the  period  of  babyhood  and  childhood, 
and  the  higher  in  the  scale  of  being,  the 
longer  that  period,  and  the  more  time  it 
takes  to  complete  the  growth,  and  arrive 
at  a state  of  full  bodily  maturity. 

Now  man  is  the  highest  in  the  scale 
of  being,  and  consequently  his  period  of 
childhood  and  growth  is  longest  of  all 
the  creatures  that  God  has  created. 
But  we  must  remember  that  God  has 
made  man  ruler  over  all  else  that  He  has 
created,  and  it  is  therefore  necessary  that 
he  should  have  many  years  of  growth  in 
order  that  he  might  be  taught,  and 
gain  knowledge,  experience,  and  wis- 
dom, so  that,  when  he  should  reach  his 
full  maturity,  he  may  be  endowed  with 
fullest  powers,  as  God  has  ordained,  so 
that  he  might  be  worthy  of  the  high 
place  which  God  has  assigned  him  as 
ruler  over  all  else  that  He  has  created, 
and  be  worthy  to  stand  in  the  scale  of 
being  next  to  God  Himself,  in  whose 
likeness  and  image  man  was  created. 

My  dear  boy,  like  many  others  you 
may  often  have  wished  that  you  might 
sooner  become  a man.  But  God  surely 


56  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW . 

knows  best,  and  the  years  which  still  lie 
between  this  and  the  time  when,  at 
twenty-five  years  of  age,  you  shall  have 
reached  your  full  bodily  maturity,  is  not 
too  long  in  order  that  you  may  be  fully 
prepared  to  bear  life's  burdens,  and  to 
discharge  all  of  man's  serious  responsi- 
bilities. Even  though,  in  your  own 
home,  you  enjoy  exceptional  opportuni- 
ties and  advantages,  yet  like  all  boys  you 
will  need  to  be  both  patient  and  indus- 
trious, that  these  valuable  years  may  not 
be  wasted,  but  properly  improved. 


CYLINDER  VI. 


Had  God  Created  All  as  He  Did  Adam  and 
Eve,  Our  Present  Conditions  and  Relations 
Could  Not  Exist. — There  Would  Be  No 
Homes,  Parents,  or  Children. — No  Childhood 
with  Plays  and  Pleasures. — All  Plans  Were 
Open  to  God. — He  Chose  the  Best  Plan. — God 
Gave  Man  Power  Similar  to  His  Creative 
Power. — Purity  of  Parentage. — Why  Parents 
Love  Their  Children. — The  Twain  Made  One 
in  Their  Children. — The  Human  Egg,  or 
Ovum. — The  Male  Life  Germ. — How  Life  is 
Begotten. — Conversation  of  Mother  and 
Child. — The  Study  of  the  Subject  Begets 
Awe  and  Reverence. — The  Wisest  Cannot 
Fully  Understand  or  Explain  our  Beginning 
and  Growth. 

My  Dear  Friend  Harry:  Starting 
with  the  plants,  night  by  night  I have 
talked  to  you  of  fishes,  birds,  and  ani- 
mals, and  to-night  we  are  to  consider 
how  God  has  ordained  that  the  life  of 
man  should  be  perpetuated  upon  the 
earth. 

If  God  had  created  each  individual 


57 


58  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

separately,  full-sized  men  and  women, 
without  parents,  and  without  a child- 
hood, all  the  conditions  of  our  lives 
would  be  different  from  what  they  now 
are.  There  would  be  no  homes,  for  all 
the  relations  of  life  upon  which  the  home 
now  rests  could  not  exist.  There  would 
be  no  relations  such  as  husband  and 
wife,  father  and  mother,  parent  and 
child,  brother  and  sister,  aunts,  uncles, 
cousins,  and  no  grandpas  or  grandmas. 
Each  individual  would  stand  independ- 
ently and  unrelated  to  any  and  all 
others.  The  loves  and  affections  which 
now  give  to  life  its  sweetest  charm  and 
its  noblest  inspiration,  would  be  entirely 
lacking.  Instead  of  being  as  links  in  an 
unbroken  succession  of  life,  you  and  I 
and  each  individual  would  stand  alone 
with  no  one  to  share  our  joys,  to  help 
us  bear  our  burdens,  to  minister  to  our 
needs,  to  watch  over  us  as  our  parents 
and  friends  now  do  in  sickness,  or  to 
mourn  our  loss  at  death.  There  would 
be  no  sweet  little  babies,  with  dimpled 
cheeks  and  chubby  chins,  no  childhood, 
with  its  plays  and  pleasures,  no  school 
days,  and  no  gradual  unfolding  of  the 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  59 

mind  and  needed  preparation  for  life’s 
purpose  and  work. 

All  plans  for  creating  the  first  people 
who  should  live  upon  the  earth,  and  those 
who  should  come  afterward  to  take  their 
places,  were  open  to  God.  He  was  not 
limited  by  any  one  or  even  many  ways 
of  doing  this,  for  all  wisdom  and  all 
power  belong  to  Him.  But  God  saw 
that  for  Him  to  go  on  creating  men 
would  not  be  the  best  plan.  God 
wanted  to  bring  man  very  close  to  Him- 
self and  so  God  gave  man  the  power  to 
transmit  life;  the  power  to  receive  life 
from  parents,  and  in  later  years  to  hand 
it  down  to  their  own  children.  In  order 
that  this  might  be  accomplished,  when 
God  created  Adam  and  Eve,  “ male  and 
female  created  He  them,”  and  endowed 
them  with  this  marvelous  power,  and  in- 
trusted this  power  to  them  as  a sacred 
gift. 

So  you  see,  my  dear  friend  Harry, 
that  the  question  which  relates  to  sex, 
concerning  which  thoughtless  boys  and 
wicked  men  think  and  speak  so  vul- 
garly and  lewdly  is,  after  all,  to  be 
thought  and  spoken  of  only  with  rever- 


60  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

ence  and  purity.  God  made  men  and 
women  to  differ.  He  gave  to  woman 
her  graceful  figure,  and  a sense  of  de- 
pendence; and  He  gave  to  man  his 
broader  shoulders  and  greater  strength, 
in  order  that  man  might  guard,  defend, 
and  protect  woman,  not  only  from  out- 
ward physical  danger,  but  from  every 
impurity  of  thought,  word,  and  deed. 
No  boy  or  man  can  think  irreverently 
of  the  subjects  which  relate  to  sex  with- 
out dishonoring  God  and  wronging 
himself. 

As  you  have  seen  the  mutual  interest 
of  the  parent  birds  in  the  care  and  well- 
being of  the  baby  birds  in  the  nests,  so 
you  daily  experience  the  love  and  affec- 
tion of  your  parents  in  many  ways,  and 
if  you  are  the  very  thoughtful  boy  that  I 
have  taken  you  to  be,  you  may  possibly 
have  asked  yourself  the  question  why 
Papa  and  Mamma  love  you  so  much  as 
to  have  actual  pleasure  in  doing  such 
things  as  no  others  upon  earth  would 
be  willing  or  even  able  to  do  for  you  in 
such  a devoted  and  loving  way.  I will 
tell  you  why.  It  is  because  in  you 
Mamma  and  Papa  find  a reproduction  of 


WHA  T A YOUNG  ^BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW . 6l 

themselves.  You  are  part  of  them. 
You  are  not  only  part  of  Mamma,  be- 
cause in  some  senses  God  gave  you  first 
to  her,  and  in  that  divine  and  mysterious 
way  unfolded  within  her  body  that 
which  was  to  constitute  all  the  members 
of  your  body  “ When  as  yet  there  was 
none  of  them,”  but  Papa  likewise  loves 
you  because  you  are  part  of  his  body 
also.  You  have  likely  read  in  the  Bible 
where  it  speaks  of  the  husband  and  wife, 
and  says,  “ And  they  twain,”  or  two, 
“ shall  be  one  flesh,”  and  so  your  Papa 
and  Mamma  are  made  one  in  you,  and 
again  in  the  little  sister  who  so  recently 
came  to  your  home  in  the  manner  in 
which  God  ordained,  and  which  He  has 
instituted  as  the  means  of  binding 
fathers,  mothers,  and  children  very 
closely  to  each  other,  and  drawing  all 
unitedly  very  close  to  Himself. 

I have  already  told  you  that  since  the 
creation  all  forms  of  life  begin  with  an 
egg.  This  is  true  also  of  human  life. 
But  the  egg,  or  ovum,  as  it  is  called 
when  formed  in  the  body  of  a woman,  is 
very  small;  so  small  indeed  that  it  is  not 
large  enough  to  be  seen  unless  placed 


62  IVHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

under  a magnifying  glass.  The  same  is 
true  also  of  the.  spermatozoa  or  life 
germs,  contained  in  the  fluid  called  semen 
which  forms  in  the  body  of  a man,  and 
by  which,  in  the  state  of  pure  and  holy 
marriage,  God  has  ordained  that  the 
ovum,  while  yet  in  the  body  of  the  wife, 
shall  be  fertilized  by  the  requisite  and 
proper  bodily  contact  of  the  husband, 
and  that  without  such  contact,  the  ovum 
or  egg  should  never  produce  life. 

In  order  that  you  may  more  fully 
understand  the  mystery  of  the  begin- 
ning of  life  I am  going  to  read  to  you 
from  a booklet  written  by  Dr.  Mary 
Wood-Alien,  who  is  a noble,  pure- 
minded  woman,  and  a devoted  Christian 
mother,  and  who  narrates  the  following 
conversation  between  a thoughtful  little 
boy  and  a mother  who  wisely  prefers  to 
teach  her  child  the  truth  rather  than  to 
leave  him  to  the  polluting  influences  of 
the  school  or  the  street. 

“ Mamma,  how  big  was  I when  I was 
made?  ” asked  a little  boy. 

“ When  you  were  made,  my  dear,  you 
were  but  a tiny  speck,  not  so  big  as 
the  point  of  a needle.  You  could  not 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  63 

have  been  seen  except  with  a micro- 
scope.” 

“ Why,  Mamma,  if  I was  as  small  as 
that  I should  think  I would  have  been 
lost.” 

“ So  you  would,  dear  child,  if  the  kind 
Heavenly  Father  had  not  taken  especial 
care  of  you.  He  knew  how  precious 
little  babies  are,  and  so  He  has  made 
a little  room  in  the  mother’s  body,  where 
they  can  be  kept  from  all  harm  until 
they  are  big  enough  to  live  their  own 
separate  lives.” 

“ And  did  I live  in  such  a little  room 
in  you?” 

“ Yes,  dear.” 

“ But  how  did  I eat  and  breathe?  ” 

“ I ate  and  breathed  for  you.” 

“ Did  you  know  I was  there?  ” 

“ Yes.  Sometimes  your  little  hand  or 
foot  would  knock  on  the  wall  of  the 
room,  and  I would  feel  it  and  would  say, 
‘ My  darling  speaks  to  me  and  says, 
“ Mother,  I am  here  ” 9 ; and  then  I 
would  say,  ‘ Good-morning,  little  one, 
mother  loves  you  and  then  I would  try 
to  think  how  you  would  look  when  I 
should  see  you.” 


64  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 


“ How  long  was  I there,  Mamma?  ” 

“ Three-quarters,  of  a year,  and  you 
grew  and  grew  every  day,  and,  because 
I wanted  you  to  be  happy,  I tried  to  be 
happy  all  the  time,  and  I was  careful  to 
eat  good  food  so  that  you  might  be 
strong,  and  I tried  to  be  gentle,  kind, 
patient,  persevering,  in  fact,  everything 
that  I wanted  you  to  be,  for  I knew  that 
everything  I did  would  help  to  make  you 
what  you  were  to  be.” 

“ But  Mamma,  how  did  what  you  ate 
feed  me?” 

“ My  food  was  made  into  blood,  and 
the  blood  was  carried  to  you  and  nour- 
ished you.” 

“ But  how?  ” 

“ Did  you  ever  see  Mamma  make  a 
dumpling?  ” 

“ Yes.  You  took  the  dough  and  put 
the  apple  in  and  gathered  the  dough  all 
up  in  one  place  and  pinched  it  together.” 
“ Yes,  and  you  are  much  like  a dump- 
ling. Your  skin  is  folded  around  you 
like  the  dough  around  the  apple  and  is 
gathered  together  in  one  place  on  the 
front  of  the  body.  We  call  it  the  navel 
or  umbilicus.  Before  you  were  born 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  65 

the  skin  at  this  point  was  continued  in 
a long  cord  which  was  connected  with 
Mamma,  and  through  it  the  blood  was 
carried  to  you.  When  the  time  came 
for  you  to  go  out  into  the  world  to  live 
apart  from  me,  the  door  of  your  little 
room  opened  with  much  pain  and  suffer- 
ing to  me,  and  then  you  came  into  the 
world,  or  were  born,  as  we  say.  Then 
the  cord,  or  tube,  that  connected  you  to 
me  was  cut,  and,  healing  up,  formed  the 
navel  or  the  place  where  the  skin  of  the 
whole  body  is  gathered  together.  When 
you  drew  your  first  breath  into  your 
lungs,  you  cried,  and  then  I knew  you 
were  alive  and  I laughed,  and  said,  ‘ Is 
it  a boy  or  girl?’  After  you  were  washed 
and  dressed  they  brought  you  to  me  and 
laid  you  on  my  arm  and,  for  the  first 
time,  I saw  the  face  of  the  little  baby  I 
had  loved  so  long.  And  now  you  can 
understand  why  you  are  so  dear  to  me.” 

“ Oh,  Mamma,  now  I know  why  I 
love  you  best  of  all  the  world,”  ex- 
claimed the  child,  with  warm  embraces 
and  with  loving  tears  in  his  eyes. 

I am  sure,  dear  Harry,  that  no  one 
can  properly  study  the  mystery  of  the 


66  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

origin  of  life  without  having  quickened 
in  him  a feeling  of  awe  and  reverence. 
In  this  whole  matter  God  works  in  such 
marvelous  mystery  that  not  even  the 
wisest  man  that  ever  lived  can  either 
fully  understand  or  explain  it. 

On  this  cylinder  and  those  which  have 
preceded  it,  you  now  have  what  I have 
tried,  as  far  as  I have  been  able,  to  make 
a true,  full,  and  satisfactory  answer  to 
the  question  which  a couple  of  weeks 
ago  you  asked  of  your  Mamma,  and 
which,  at  your  Mamma’s  request,  I un- 
dertook to  answer.  There  is  one  ques- 
tion which  stands  closely  related  to  what 
we  have  been  considering,  and  before 
bidding  you  good-by,  I will  to-morrow 
night  call  your  attention  to  it. 


CYLINDER  VII. 


Papa’s  Request  to  Continue  the  Talks. — Why- 
Children  Look  Like  Their  Parents. — Parents 
Transmit  Both  Bodily  and  Mental  Character- 
istics.— Unhealthy  Parents  Cannot  Have 
Healthy  Children. — What  the  Boy  is,  Deter- 
mines What  the  Man  Shall  Be,  and  What 
His  Children  Shall  Be. — The  Boy’s  Duty  to 
Those  Who  Are  to  Come  after  Him. — A 
Good  Inheritance  N o Occasion  for  Boasting. 
— “ Heredity  Not  Fatality.” — Duty  to  Im- 
prove What  We  Have. 

My  Dear  Friend  Harry:  A letter 
received  from  your  Papa  to-day  has  been 
to  me  the  source  of  much  pleasure.  He 
also  has  listened  to  the  cylinders  which 
I have  sent  you  each  evening,  and  with 
kind  expressions  of  appreciation  and  ap- 
proval, has  asked  me  to  continue  my 
Talks  along  some  related  lines  of 
thought,  which  I trust  may  prove  both 
suggestive  and  of  real  value  to  you.  I 
have  granted  his  request,  and  to-morrow 
evening  will  begin  a few  Talks  on  some 
abuses  of  the  reproductive  organs,  and 

67 


68  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

how  boys  may  preserve  their  entire 
bodies  in  purity  and  strength. 

From  what  I told  you  in  the  phono- 
graph last  night,  you  will,  I think,  be 
able  fully  to  understand  why  children 
so  often  look  like  their  parents,  act  like 
them,  think  like  them — are  so  much  like 
them  in  many  respects  that  we  frequently 
hear  the  expression,  “ He  is  a chip  of 
the  old  block.” 

God  has  not  only  ordained  that  every 
plant  shall  bear  seed  “ after  his  kind,” 
but  shall  also  transmit  to  its  successors 
its  own  minor  characteristics.  When  you 
plant  pop-corn,  the  seed  will  not  grow 
to  be  some  great  tall  variety  of  corn, 
neither  when  you  set  the  eggs  of  ban- 
tams will  they  hatch  leghorns  or  light 
brahmas.  The  corn  and  the  little  chicks 
will  grow  to  be  much  like  their  parents. 
So  it  is  with  children.  Their  bodily  be- 
ginning is  in  many  ways  a gift  from 
their  parents,  in  which  the  natures  of 
papa  and  mamma  are  united,  and  on  this 
account  the  child  is  the  embodiment  of 
both.  Sometimes  the  child  resembles 
one  parent  in  looks  and  the  other  in 
character.  Sometimes  the  color  of  the 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  69 

child’s  eyes  are  like  the  eyes  of  the 
father;  in  others  like  those  of  the  mother; 
while  in  other  instances,  the  color  of  the 
eyes  of  the  child  may  be  an  expression 
of  the  combined  influence  of  both  par- 
ents, or  even  of  its  grandparents.  The 
same  is  true  of  the  color,  quantity,  and 
quality  of  the  hair,  and  of  the  other 
physical  manifestations  which  go  so  far 
toward  making  up  the  looks  of  a person. 

What  is  true  of  the  looks  is  true  also 
of  the  health  which  parents  transmit 
to  their  children.  Where  fathers  and 
mothers  do  not  have  good  health  them- 
selves they  cannot  transmit  or  give  good 
health  to  their  children.  If  the  parents 
have  weak,  sickly,  or  diseased  bodies  the 
children  will  be  like  them  in  this  respect. 
You  will  see,  then,  how  important  it  is 
that  fathers  and  mothers  should  have 
good  health  if  they  desire  to  have 
healthy,  cheerful,  and  happy  children. 
But  if  people  desire  to  have  good  health 
to  transmit  to  their  children  they  must 
preserve  their  health  while  they  are 
young.  What  is  done  during  boyhood 
determines  what  shall  be  the  condition 
during  manhood.  What  the  boy  is  and 


70  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

does  will  determine  what  the  man  shall 
be  later  on.  And  so,  Harry,  if  you  do 
not  take  care  of  your  health,  or  if  you 
do  anything-  now  to  injure  it,  then,  in 
later  years,  when  you  shall  yourself  be- 
come a father,  your  children  will  be  sure 
to  suffer  the  results  of  your  negligence 
and  imprudence. 

The  same  is  true  of  mental  character- 
istics. In  this  also  children  receive  their 
inheritance  from  their  parents.  In  char- 
acter, some  children  resemble  one  par- 
ent; in  others  there  are  some  resem- 
blances to  both,  while,  in  other  instances, 
a child  may  inherit  the  result  of  the  com- 
bined influences  which  have  come  down 
through  a generation  or  two. 

If  these  things  are  true,  as  they  un- 
questionably are,  then  you  see  how  influ- 
ences which  exerted  themselves  long 
years  before  you  were  born  have  all  cen- 
tered and  wrought  together  to  make  you 
what  you  were  when  you  were  born. 
And  so,  in  like  manner,  what  you  are 
now,  while  a boy,  and  what  you  shall 
grow  to  be  in  physical  strength,  in  bodily 
health,  in  mind,  and  character,  that  your 
children  shall  largely  become  hereafter. 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  71 

If  you  are  gentle,  kind,  and  truthful,  it 
will  be  easier  for  them  to  be  gentle,  kind, 
and  truthful.  If  you  were  to  be  dis- 
obedient, cruel,  and  deceitful,  you  would, 
by  your  conduct,  make  it  difficult  for 
them  not  to  do  the  same  things;  but  if 
you  cheerfully  obey  your  parents,  honor 
and  love  them,  and  love  and  serve  God, 
you  will  make  it  easier  for  your  children 
to  love  and  obey  you,  and  to  be  faithful 
and  upright  Christian  boys  and  girls. 

You  will  see  from  what  I have  said 
to-night  something  of  what  the  Bible 
means  where  it  says  that  “No  man  liveth 
to  himself,  and  no  man  dieth  to  him- 
self.” We  stand  related  to  the  genera- 
tions which  have  preceded  us,  and  we 
owe  a duty  to  the  generations  that  shall 
come  after  us. 

You  have  been  blessed  with  good 
physical  and  intellectual  powers,  and  this 
should  be  to  you  the  occasion  for  great 
thankfulness,  and  not  for  boasting. 
Neither  should  those  of  us  who  have 
strong  bodies  think  uncharitably  and 
without  sympathy  of  those  who  have  re- 
ceived an  inheritance  of  physical' infirmi- 
ties. We  should  also  remember  that 


72  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

“ Heredity  is  not  fatality.”  Although 
we  have  received  strong  bodies,  yet  we 
may  ruin  them  by  abuse,  and  so,  in  like 
manner,  by  care  and  perseverance,  those 
who  have  weaker  bodies  and  less  vigor- 
ous minds  may  acquire  much,  and  even 
surpass  those  who  received  more  by 
nature  or  inheritance.  Our  great  care 
should  be  to  improve  all  we  have,  and  to 
see  to  it  that  those  who  come  after  us 
shall  suffer  nothing  because  of  our  sin 
or  folly. 


PART  IL 


The  Manner  in  which  the  Reproductive  Organs 
are  Injured  in  Boys  by  Abuse* 


CYLINDER  VIII. 


Man  is  an  Animal. — Has  Intelligence,  a Moral 
Sense,  and  a Conscience. — How  the  Intellect, 
Moral  Sense,  and  Conscience  are  Dwarfed 
and  Blunted. — Comparative  Anatomy. — 
Points  of  Resemblance  in  Bodies  of  Man 
and  Four-footed  Animals. — Between  Man 
and  Birds. — Man  the  Only  Animal  with  a 
Perfect  Pland. — Without  the  Hand,  Man 
Could  Not  Rise  Much  above  the  Animals. — 
With  the  Hand,  He  Constructs,  Builds,  and 
Blesses  His  Fellows. — With  the  Hand,  He 
Smites,  Slays,  and  Injures. — With  His  Hand 
He  Pollutes  and  Degrades  Himself. 

My  Dear  Friend  Harry:  At  the  re- 
quest of  your  father  I am  to  continue 
these  evening  Talks  for  a period,  and  to- 
night I want  to  call  your  attention  to 
some  similarity  between  animals,  which 
possibly  you  may  not  have  noticed. 

When  we  speak  of  animals,  you  will 
remember  that  man  is  an  animal,  al- 
though he  is  the  highest  in  the  scale  of 
being,  and  God  has  placed  him  over  all 


75 


76  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

the  other  animals.  God  has  endowed 
him  with  intellectual  powers,  so  that  he 
can  think  and  reason,  has  given  him 
a moral  sense,  so  that  he  might  know 
right  from  wrong,  and  has  also  endowed 
him  with  a conscience  which  approves 
when  he  does  right  and  reproves  when 
he  does  wrong. 

Man  may  pervert  his  thinking  powers, 
and  use  them  for  bad  purposes,  to  de- 
vise evil,  to  plot  the  injury  of  his  fellow- 
men,  and  even  to  conspire  against  God, 
He  may  also  weaken  and  deaden  his 
moral  sense,  the  same  as  he  does  his 
intellectual  powers  when  he  fails  to  exer- 
cise them.  These  results  you  see  when 
a boy  does  not  attend  school,  but  neg- 
lects to  discipline  and  cultivate  his  mind; 
and  you  also  see  a similar  result  when 
boys  and  men  neglect  to  attend  Sunday- 
school,  the  preaching  of  God’s  word, 
and  refuse  to  read  good  books,  or  to 
exercise  their  moral  sense  as  God 
has  designed  it  should  be  exercised 
and  developed.  Men  may,  and  many 
do,  turn  a deaf  ear  to  conscience  by 
persistently  and  continuously  refusing 
to  obey  its  dictates,  until  finally,  when 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  77 

conscience  reproves  they  fail,  in  a large 
measure,  to  be  conscious  of  its  reproof. 
The  same  as  when  you  place  an  alarm 
clock  in  your  bedroom  and  set  it  for 
five  o’clock  in  the  morning.  The  first 
morning  when  it  rings  it  startles  you, 
and,  if  you  rise  immediately  and  dress, 
then,  morning  after  morning  afterward, 
when  it  rings,  you  will  continue  to  be 
awakened,  so  long  as  you  respond  to  its 
call.  But  if,  upon  the  other  hand,  when 
the  clock  rings,  you  say  to  yourself  that 
you  will  sleep  “just  a moment,”  and 
fall  into  unconsciousness,  and  sleep  until 
your  father  or  mother  awakens  you,  the 
next  morning  when  the  clock  rings  you 
may  possibly  be  wakened,  but  if  you  turn 
over  and  go  to  sleep  again,  after  two  or 
three  mornings,  when  the  clock  rings, 
you  will  fail  to  be  aroused  at  all  by  its 
call.  So  it  is  with  conscience.  If  we 
respond  to  its  admonitions  all  is  well; 
but  if  we  are  indifferent  when  conscience 
approves  or  disapproves,  after  a time  we 
become  deaf  to  its  admonitions.  Not 
that  conscience  fails  to  reprove,  any 
more  than  the  alarm  clock  fails  to  ring; 
but,  having  neglected  to  respond  to  its 


78  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

warning,  after  a time  we  become  indif- 
ferent to  its  reproof,  and  live  on  in  open 
sin  as  though  we  had  no  conscience  at 
all. 

Thus  you  see  that  while  man  is  an 
animal,  he  is  elevated  above  all  the  other 
animals  by  the  endowments  of  intelli- 
gence, a moral  sense,  and  a conscience, 
which  God  has  given  him. 

But  I desire  also  to  call  your  attention 
to  some  remarkable  similarities  and  dif- 
ferences in  the  body  of  man  and  those 
of  other  animals.  Now,  if  you  get  down 
upon  your  hands  and  knees  upon  the 
floor,  you  will  notice  that  there  is  a great 
likeness  in  the  form  of  your  body  and 
the  form  of  the  body  of  a horse,  or  cow, 
or  dog,  and  all  four-footed  animals. 
When  in  this  position  you  will  see  that 
your  arms  and  hands,  in  a large  measure, 
correspond  to  their  forelegs  and  feet. 
In  some,  as  with  the  dog  and  cat,  the 
small  extensions,  or  toes  on  their  feet, 
correspond  also  with  the  fingers  and  toes 
upon  your  hands  and  feet.  With  others, 
as  in  the  case  of  the  horse,  the  fingers 
and  toes  are  gathered  into  one  foot,  and 
the  nails,  which  are  on  the  ends  of  your 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  79 

fingers  and  toes  are  enlarged  and  gath- 
ered into  one  thick  nail,  which  forms  the 
hoof  of  the  horse,  or  the  double  hoof  of 
the  cow. 

Now  if  you  stand  on  your  feet,  and 
pass  your  arms  behind  you,  and  hold 
them  pretty  well  up  on  your  back,  you 
will  see  that  the  form  of  your  body  in 
that  position  resembles  the  form  of  the 
body  of  a bird;  your  legs  and  feet  cor- 
responding to  their  legs  and  feet,  and 
your  arms  corresponding  to  their  wings. 
The  study  of  such  similarities  learned 
men  call  the  study  of  comparative  anat- 
omy. So  you  see  that  there  is  some 
similarity  between  the  construction  of 
our  bodies  and  the  construction  of  the 
bodies  of  other  animals. 

But  there  is  one  particular  in  which 
the  human  body  differs  from  all  the 
others.  Man  is  the  only  animal  to  whom 
God  has  given  a perfect  hand.  Even 
with  our  intellectual  endowment,  if  God 
had  not  given  us  our  hands  it  would 
have  been  physically  impossible  for  man 
to  have  risen  much  above  the  level  of 
the  lower  animals,  but  with  his  hands 
man  prepares  his  food,  compounds  his 


80  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

medicine,  manufactures  his  clothing, 
builds  houses  in  which  to  live,  writes 
books,  prints  papers,  constructs  all  kinds 
of  machinery,  builds  railroads  and  great 
steamships  with  which  he  can  outdo 
even  the  birds  in  their  flight.  With  all 
these  things  God  is  doubtless  well 
pleased. 

But  because  of  the  evil  in  man’s  mind 
and  the  wickedness  in  his  heart  he  also 
uses  his  hands  to  inflict  pain  and  injury 
upon  his  fellow-man.  He  constructs 
great  cannons,  and  gunboats,  and  other 
instruments  of  death  with  which  he 
destroys  his  fellow-man  in  battle. 
Moved  by  the  wickedness  in  his  heart, 
and  encouraged  and  helped  on  by  Satan 
and  others  who  are  wicked  like  himself, 
man  uses  his  hands  to  accomplish  many 
things  which  are  very  displeasing  in  the 
sight  of  God. 

But,  strange  to  say,  man  is  possibly 
the  only  animal  which  persistently  pol- 
lutes and  degrades  his  own  body,  and 
this  would  not  have  been  easily  pos- 
sible to  him  if  God  had  not  given  him 
hands,  which  He  designed  should  prove 
useful  and  a means  of  great  help  and 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  Si 

blessing  to  him  in  his  life  upon  the 
earth. 

In  order  that  the  hand  might  not  be 
used  for  degrading  his  own  body,  or  for 
the  injury  of  his  fellow-men,  God  en- 
dowed man  with  wisdom,  with  a moral 
sense,  and  with  conscience,  so  that  his 
hands  should  be  to  him  a source  of  help 
and  blessing,  and  not  a means  of  defile- 
ment and  injury  and  thus  prove  a curse. 


CYLINDER  IX. 


God’s  Purpose  in  Giving  Us  Hands. — The  Con- 
fidence God  has  Reposed  in  Our  Use  of 
Them. — With  Man,  the  Sexual  Member  is 
Exposed. — Through  Ignorance,  Boys  Often 
Learn  Masturbation. — Sliding  Down  the 
Banister,  Climbing  Trees,  etc.  — Danger 
from  Ignorant  and  Evil  Servants. — Intelli- 
gence Necessary  for  Safety. 

My  Dear  Friend  Harry:  When 
God  gave  man  hands,  He  also  gave  him 
intelligence,  a moral  sense,  and  a con- 
science that  he  might  use  them  aright. 
With  his  hands  God  meant  that  man 
should  lift  himself  up  infinitely  above 
the  animals,  but  some  men,  and  we  are 
sorry  to  say  boys,  too,  use  their  hands 
so  as  to  debase  themselves  below  the 
level  of  the  most  degraded  brute.  In- 
stead of  using  their  hands  as  intelligent 
and  moral  beings  should  do,  they  use 
their  hands  so  as  to  pollute  their  bodies, 
by  handling  and  toying  with  their  sexual 
member  in  such  a way  as  to  produce  a 

82 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  83 

sensation,  or  feeling,  which  may  give 
a momentary  pleasure,  but  which  results 
in  the  most  serious  of  injuries  to  the 
moral,  intellectual,  and  physical  powers. 
God  did  not  give  us  a sexual  member 
or  organ  to  be  used  in  this  way,  and 
such  a use  of  it  is  called  self-pollution 
or  masturbation. 

Man  is  the  only  animal  except  one 
whose  sexual  organ  is  exposed  on  the 
outside  of  his  body,  and  the  only  animal 
to  whom  self-pollution  is  mechanically 
or  physically  possible.  The  rare  in- 
stances which  are  in  conflict  with  this 
statement  are  accidental  and  altogether 
exceptional.  In  the  care  and  use  of  the 
sexual  member  God  has  reposed  the 
greatest  trust  in  man’s  intelligence  and 
moral  sense.  Upon  no  other  animal 
has  God  placed  such  confidence  and  re- 
sponsibilities as  upon  man.  But  because 
of  the  wickedness  of  the  human  heart, 
the  temptations  of  Satan,  and  sometimes 
also  because  of  ignorance  upon  this  im- 
portant subject,  even  young  boys  begin 
to  go  wrong,  and  with  no  one  to  in- 
struct and  warn  them,  they  pursue  evil 
habits  which  result  in  great  injury,  and 


84  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

if  the  practice  is  not  stopped  the  individ- 
ual is  plunged  into  great  vice  and 
degradation. 

I wish  that  I might  say  to  you,  Harry, 
that  but  very  few  boys  have  ever  known 
anything  of  this  vice,  but  I do  not  be- 
lieve that  such  a statement  would  be 
true.  I can  say,  however,  that  many 
pure-minded  and  innocent  boys  have 
learned  the  habit  in  very  innocent  ways, 
and  in  the  beginning  not  even  mistrust- 
ing that  the  habit  was  either  wicked  or 
injurious.  Many  boys  at  a very  early 
age  have  discovered  the  sensation  by 
sliding  down  the  banisters,  or  at  a little 
later  period  in  life  by  climbing  and  de- 
scending trees,  by  riding  on  horse-back, 
and  some  because  of  uncleanness  of  the 
sexual  member  have  experienced  an 
itching  of  these  parts,  and  when  relief 
has  been  sought  by  chafing  or  rubbing, 
the  child  has  been  introduced  to  the 
habit  of  self-pollution.  Sometimes  by 
constipation  of  the  bowels,  or  in  simpler 
language,  a failure  to  go  regularly  each 
morning  and  pass  from  the  lower  portion 
of  the  body  the  worn  out  and  waste 
matter  which  has  accumulated  in  the  in- 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  85 

testines,  and  this  neglect,  when  often  re- 
peated or  long  continued,  results  in 
producing  what  is  called  constipation, 
which  often  proves  very  injurious,  and, 
for  causes  that  I need  not  now  stop  to 
explain,  produces  a tendency  to  local 
sensitiveness  and  leads  to  self-pollution. 

A similar,  or  even  greater  sensitive- 
ness of  the  sexual  member  is  sometimes 
produced  by  pin-worms  in  the  rectum,  or 
lowest  part  of  the  intestines.  But  I am 
sorry  also  to  say  that  masturbation  is 
sometimes  even  taught  by  one  boy  to 
another,  and  during  the  infancy  of  chil- 
dren, even  nurses,  sometimes,  in  igno- 
rance of  the  terrible  evil  and  sad  con- 
sequences of  their  act,  practice  this 
destructive  habit  upon  very  young  chil- 
dren for  the  purpose  of  diverting  their 
thoughts,  so  that  they  will  not  cry,  or 
in  order  that  they  may  be  quieted  and 
fall  asleep.  It  is  terrible  to  think  that 
intelligent  people  could  do  such  things, 
but  on  account  of  the  prevalence  of  these 
practices  it  is  necessary  that  we  should 
understand  the  danger  to  which  children 
are  exposed  so  that  we  may  be  properly 
upon  our  guard  against  the  temptations 


86  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

from  without  and,  by  the  aid  of  our  in- 
telligence, be  saved  from  the  terrible 
consequences  which  are  visited  upon 
many  because  of  the  evil  practices  which 
they  begin  in  their  ignorance. 

I trust,  my  dear  boy,  that  you  may 
be  saved  from  this  and  all  other  forms 
of  vice. 


CYLINDER  X. 


The  Sexual  Member  a Part  of  the  Reproduc- 
tive System.  — The  Reproductive  System 
Defined. — Illustrated  By  a Watch. — The 
Different  Parts  of  the  Digestive  System. — 
God  Gave  Us  a Reproductive  System  for 
the  Wisest  and  Most  Beneficent  Ends. — By 
Wrong  Thoughts  of  Them,  We  Dishonor 
God. — To  Be  Held  in  Purity  and  Honor. — 
Our  Bodies  the  Temples  of  the  Holy  Ghost. 
— The  Holy  Place,  and  the  Holy  of  Holies.— 
The  Wonderful  Mystery  of  Creative  Power. 
— How  the  Mind,  Imagination,  and  Heart 
Are  Polluted. — What  the  Bible  Says  Upon 
These  Subjects. 

My  Dear  Friend  Harry:  Last  night 
I told  you  how  some  young  boys,  and 
older  boys  also,  pollute  and  degrade  their 
own  bodies  by  unnecessarily  and  injuri- 
ously handling  or  scratching  and  chafing 
the  sexual  member.  God  gave  us  this 
member  to  serve  us  in  the  removal  of 
the  wasted  or  worn  out  fluids  of  the 
body,  and  also  made  it  one  of  the  parts 
of  the  human  reproductive  system. 

87 


88  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

What  the  reproductive  system  or  organs 
are  to  plants  I told  you  on  a previous 
cylinder.  They  are  the  organs  in  the 
male,  and  also  in  the  female  plant  which 
are  engaged  in  the  production  of  the 
seeds  from  which  life  is  to  be  reproduced. 

Something  of  the  nature  and  office  of 
the  reproductive  system  may  be  learned 
by  supposing  that  a watch  could  be  built 
and  given  power  to  keep  its  own  wheels, 
and  all  its  works  in  repair,  so  that  it 
would  not  have  to  be  taken  to  the  jewel- 
er’s to  have  any  worn  parts  replaced  by 
new  parts.  Then  suppose  that  in  addi- 
tion to  this  renewing  power  it  should 
also  be  endowed  with  a power  to  repro- 
duce other  watches ; so  that  while  it  was 
keeping  accurate  time,  renewing  its  own 
wear  and  wasting  of  the  wheels  and  all 
the  parts,  it  should  also  have  the  power 
to  produce  other  watches;  little  baby 
watches,  which  should  also  have  im- 
parted to  them  the  power  to  grow 
and,  when  they  became  fully  grown  and 
were  large  watches,  then  also  in  turn, 
from  time  to  time,  they  also  should  pro- 
duce other  watches.  This  new  power 
by  which  the  watch  would  produce 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW . 89 

others  would  be  called  the  reproductive 
power,  and  if  there  were  certain  parts  in 
the  watch  which  were  devoted  wholly  to 
the  production  of  these  little  baby 
watches,  such  portions  of  the  watch 
would  together  be  called  the  repro- 
ductive organs. 

Now  the  sexual  member  is  only  one 
part  of  the  reproductive  system:  the 
same,  as  in  our  bodies,  we  have  a diges- 
tive system  composed  of  several  mem- 
bers or  parts.  The  food  is  taken  into  the 
mouth  and,  after  being  chewed  or  masti- 
cated, as  we  say,  is  passed  into  the 
stomach,  where  it  undergoes  changes 
which  fit  it  to  be  received  by  the  intes- 
tines, so  that  it  may  be  converted  into 
blood,  and  thus  strengthen  the  body  and 
maintain  life.  Now  the  mouth,  the  pas- 
sage-way into  the  stomach,  and  such 
portions  of  the  intestines  as  are  engaged 
in  the  work  of  digesting  and  preparing 
the  food  for  use  in  the  blood — all  these 
different  members  together  constitute 
the  digestive  system.  So  the  sexual 
member  is  one  portion  of  the  reproduc- 
tive system,  and  the  other  portions  in 
men  are  partly  without  the  body  and 


90  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

partly  within  the  body.  So,  when  taken 
together,  we  speak  of  the  sexual  organs 
and  their  functions  as  the  reproductive 
system,  and  this  portion  of  our  body  has 
been  created  by  God  Himself  for  the 
wisest  and  most  beneficent  ends.  Some- 
times boys  think  of  their  sexual  parts  in 
a very  low  and  degraded  way,  and  thus 
greatly  dishonor  God  and  wrong  them- 
selves. Whatever  God  has  created  de- 
serves to  be  held  in  honor  and  esteem. 
God  has  endowed  us  with  no  holier  or 
more  sacred  duty  than  that  of  reproduc- 
ing our  species,  and  we  should  receive 
and  accept  this  high  and  holy  office  from 
the  hands  of  our  infinite  Creator  with 
reverence,  and  maintain  these  members 
of  our  body  in  purity  and  honor.  Dr. 
Sperry,  a Christian  physician,  says  “ The 
propagation  of  our  species  is  the  high- 
est, the  divinest  act  of  our  physical  life.,, 
And  no  man,  with  a pure  heart  and  a 
thoughtful  mind,  can  come  to  any  other 
conclusion. 

I am  glad,  my  dear  friend  Harry,  that 
your  parents  often  study  the  Bible  with 
you,  that  they  may  make  its  truths  plain 
to  your  mind.  It  is  therefore  very 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  91 


proper  in  talking  with  you  to-night  upon 
this  subject  of  self-pollution,  that  I 
should  refer  you  to  First  Corinthians, 
sixth  chapter,  eighteenth  and  nineteenth 
verses,  where  Paul,  in  writing  upon  this 
very  subject,  says,  “ Flee  fornification. 
. . Fie  that  committeth  fornication  sin- 
neth  against  his  own  body.  What? 
Know  ye  not  that  your  body  is  the  tem- 
ple of  the  Holy  Ghost  which  is  in  you?  ” 
Now  the  Temple  at  Jerusalem  was  one 
of  the  most  sacred  buildings  in  all  the 
world.  The  entire  structure  was  sacred, 
but  within  the  building  there  was  a place 
called  “ The  Holy  Place,”  and  in  the  in- 
terior of  that  Holy  Place  there  was  a 
still  more  sacred  inclosure  called  “ The 
Holy  of  Holies.”  Here  dwelt  the  un- 
approachable divine  presence,  and  to- 
ward this  Holy  of  Holies  the  Israelites 
throughout  the  entire  nation  and 
throughout  the  world,  never  turned  their 
faces  but  in  devout  reverence.  So  our 
entire  bodies  are  holy,  and  are  to  be 
held  in  perpetual  honor,  but  I am  sure 
that  no  thoughtful  person  can  properly 
study  this  subject  of  the  human  body 
without  thinking  of  the  reproductive  sys- 


92  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

tem  as  the  holy  of  holies  in  which  God 
dwells  within  us  in  the  wonderful  mys- 
tery of  reproductive  power. 

Before  saying  good-night  to  you  I 
want  to  remind  you  that  the  body  may 
not  only  be  outwardly  polluted  by  the 
hands,  but  the  mind,  the  imagination, 
and  the  heart  may  be  polluted  by  means 
of  the  eye  when  we  look  upon  improper 
things  and  upon  indecent  pictures;  and 
we  may  also  produce  the  same  bad  re- 
sults with  the  ear,  by  listening  to  vile 
stories,  bad  words,  and  evil  suggestions. 
The  eye  and  the  ear  are  gateways  into 
our  minds  and  hearts,  and  we  should 
guard  them  with  great  care.  These  are 
some  of  the  avenues  by  which  the  sacred 
temple  of  our  bodies  is  entered  by  evil 
influences,  and  we  should  remember 
that  the  Bible  also  says  in  First  Corin- 
thians, third  chapter  and  nineteenth 
verse,  “ If  any  man  defile  the  temple  of 
God,  him  shall  God  destroy.”  I am  sure 
that  you  do  not  desire  to  be  banished 
from  the  presence  of  God,  and  therefore 
you  should  also  remember  what  it 
says  in  another  place  (Matthew  v.  8): 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  93 

" Blessed  are  the  pure  in  heart,  for  they 
shall  see  God.” 

To-morrow  night  I shall  tell  you  what 
are  the  consequences  in  boys  of  the  mis- 
use of  these  reproductive  organs. 


PART  m* 


What  are  the  Consequences  in  Boys  of  the  Abuse 
of  the  Reproductive  Organs* 


CYLINDER  XI. 


Origin  of  the  Different  Names  of  the  Sexual 
Sin. — Tell  of  the  Character  of  the  Sin. — 
The  Class  of  Boys  in  Greatest  Danger. — 
Need  of  Proper  Information. — An  Important 
Safeguard. — The  Moral  Sense  the  First  to 
Suffer. — Vice  Begets  in  the  Heart  Rebellion 
against  God. — The  Vicious  Most  Liable  to 
Doubt  God  and  Become  Infidels. — Unbelief 
and  Infidelity  Symptoms  of  Sexual  and  other 
Sins. 

My  Dear  Friend  Harry:  No  boy 
can  toy  with  the  exposed  portions  of  his 
reproductive  system  without  finally  suf- 
fering very  serious  consequences.  In 
the  beginning  it  may  seem  to  a boy  a 
trifling  matter,  and  yet  from  the  very 
first  his  conscience  will  tell  him  that  he 
is  doing  something  that  is  very  wrong. 
It  is  on  this  account  that  a boy  who 
yields  to  such  an  evil  temptation  will 
seek  a secluded,  solitary  place,  and  it  is 
because  of  this  fact  that  it  is  called  the 
“ solitary  vice.”  Because  the  entire  be- 


97 


9$  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

ing  of  the  one  who  indulges  in  this  prac- 
tice is  debased  and  polluted  by  his  own 
personal  act  it  is  also  called  “ self- 
pollution.,,  It  is  also  called  “ Onan- 
ism,M because,  for  a similar  offense, 
nearly  four  thousand  years  ago,  God 
punished  Onan  with  death  (Genesis 
xxxviii.  3—10).  This  sin  is  also  known 
by  another  name,  and  is  called  “ mastur- 
bation,” a word  which  is  made  from  two 
Latin  words  which  mean  “ To  pollute 
by  the  hand.” 

Each  of  these  words  tells  something 
of  the  vile  character  of  this  sin.  But 
words  are  scarcely  capable  of  describing 
the  dreadful  consequences  which  are  suf- 
fered by  those  who  persist  in  this  prac- 
tice. I do  not  believe,  my  dear  friend 
Harry,  that  you  have  become  a victim 
of  this  destructive  vice,  and  I would  be 
glad  to  believe  that  you  have  never  acci- 
dentally learned  or  have  been  deliberately 
taught  to  engage  in  it.  Knowing,  how- 
ever, the  dangers  to  which,  like  all  boys, 
you  are  exposed,  and  also  appreciating 
the  fact  that  intellectual  boys,  because 
of  a more  highly  wrought  nervous  or- 
ganization and  because  of  keener  sensi- 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  99 

bilities,  are  much  more  liable  to  become 
addicted  to  this  vice  than  boys  of  a lower 
grade  of  intellect  and  with  less  sensitive 
bodies,  I regard  it  important  that  you 
should  be  as  intelligent  and  well  in- 
formed upon  this  subject  as  upon  any 
other.  This  is  necessary  so  that,  by 
knowing  in  advance  the  character  and 
consequences  of  such  a course,  you  may 
avoid  the  evil  into  which  even  men,  as 
late  in  life  as  twenty-five  and  thirty  years 
of  age,  sometimes  fall  because  of  igno- 
rance. In  this  as  in  other  things,  “ To 
be  forewarned  is  to  be  forearmed.” 
Every  young  boy  should  be  properly  in- 
formed upon  this  subject,  for  even  those 
who  may  be  safely  guarded  from  defile- 
ment of  thought  and  life  from  outward 
influences  are  nevertheless  exposed  to 
those  inward  physical  conditions  which 
may  produce  local  irritation  and  disease, 
and  where  such  a diseased  condition  is 
ignorantly  permitted  to  continue,  mas- 
turbation soon  becomes  a fixed  habit, 
and  is  likely  to  be  practiced  with  such 
violence  that  idiocy,  and  even  death, 
may,  and  often  does  come  speedily. 
Nothing  so  much  favors  the  continuance 


IOO  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 


and  spread  of  this  awful  vice  as  igno- 
rance, and  only  by  being  early  and 
purely  taught  on  this  important  subject 
can  the  coming  boys  and  men  be  saved 
from  the  awful  consequences  which  are 
ruining  morally,  mentally,  and  physi-' 
cally  thousands  of  boys  every  year. 

As  I have  already  said,  one  of  the  first 
things  which  a boy  does  who  undertakes 
to  practice  this  vice  is  to  seek  solitude. 
From  the  very  first  his  conscience  dis- 
approves, and  so  he  cannot  engage  in 
the  evil  which  he  proposes  to  himself 
without  violating  his  moral  sense.  In- 
deed, his  moral  nature  is  the  first  to 
suffer.  This,  my  dear  boy,  is  an  impor- 
tant fact,  and  if  you  were  ever  to  fall 
a victim  to  this  vice,  you  would  find  that 
even  with  the  first  sense  of  guilt  there 
would  come  a spirit  of  rebellion  against 
God  and  against  your  parents.  You 
would  soon  begin  to  call  into  question 
the  wisdom  and  goodness  of  God.  Your 
pleasure  in  good  books,  in  religious  in- 
struction, in  the  Sunday-school,  the 
Bible,  the  Church,  and  all  holy  things 
would  rapidly  diminish.  You  would 
soon  find  in  your  heart  a rebellious  feel- 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  IOI 

mg  which  would  lead  you  to  be  disobe- 
dient, cross,  irritable,  and  reproachful. 
You  would  begin  to  lose  faith  in  all  that 
is  good,  and  as  you  persisted  in  your 
sin,  you  would  grow  less  and  less  like 
Jesus  and  more  and  more  like  Satan. 
In  other  words  the  moral  nature  is  the 
first  to  suffer  from  sexual  vice,  and 
whenever  you  hear  a boy  or  man  boast- 
ing of  his  doubts  and  railing  against 
God,  against  the  Bible,  against  purity 
and  virtue,  you  may  rest  assured  that  this 
feeling  grows  out  of  some  solitary  or 
social,  some  secret  or  open  sin  or  vice 
which  has  affected  his  moral  nature,  and 
is  degrading  and  debasing  his  heart. 

If  this  effect  upon  the  moral  nature 
were  the  only  result  of  this  solitary  vice, 
the  consequences  would  be  sufficient  to 
turn  any  intelligent  and  thoughtful  boy 
from  the  practice.  But  its  effects  upon 
the  mind  and  body  are  also  of  the  most 
serious  nature,  and  of  these  I will  speak 
to  you  to-morrow  night. 


CYLINDER  XII. 


Effect  on  the  Character  of  Boys. — After  the 
Effects  upon  the  Moral  Nature,  Those  of  the 
Nervous  System  Appear. — The  Spasm  of 
the  Nerves. — The  Mind  Next  to  Suffer. — The 
Visible  Effects  upon  the  Mind. —Physical 
Effects  Follow. — Character  of  These  Effects 
Stated. — Competent  Physician  Can  Judge 
Accurately. — The  Habit  Grows  Strong,  and 
the  Will  Grows  Weak. — Results  Where  the 
Practice  Is  Persisted  in. — The  Treatment  in 
Extreme  Cases. — The  Importance  of  Early 
Instruction. 

My  Dear  Friend  Harry:  If  I had 
time  there  are  many  thing's  I would  like 
to  tell  you  concerning  the  way  in  which 
the  effects  of  vice  are  manifested  upon 
the  moral  nature  and  are  seen  in  the 
lives  of  sinning  boys  and  men;  but  I 
must  hasten  on,  lest  you  weary. 

After  great  changes  have  been  effected 
in  the  boy’s  character,  and  the  bright, 
frank,  happy,  and  obedient  boy  has  be- 
come the  fretful,  irritable,  stolid,  and  reti- 
cent boy,  and  when  he  can  no  longer 


JOS 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  103 

look  people  squarely  and  frankly  in  the 
face,  but  seeks  to  avoid  meeting  people, 
pulls  his  cap  down  so  as  to  hide  his  eyes, 
and  goes  about  with  a shy  and  guilty 
bearing,  then  changes  which  are  mental 
and  physical  may  be  confidently  ex- 
pected. 

After  the  moral  nature,  the  nervous 
system  is  the  next  to  suffer.  In  no  other 
portion  of  the  human  body  are  so  large 
a number  of  nerves  brought  so  closely 
together  as  in  the  reproductive  organ. 
In  the  act  of  masturbation,  these  nerves 
are  wrought  upon  in  such  a manner  as 
to  produce  most  serious  results.  The 
pleasurable  emotion  with  which  the  be- 
ginning is  attended  culminates  in  a 
spasm  of  the  nerves,  terminating  for  the 
time  all  pleasure,  and  leaving  the  nerves 
as  wasted  and  depleted  as  the  body  of  a 
person  whose  entire  physical  system  has 
been  brought  under  the  influence  of  a 
spasm,  or  fit  as  it  is  called.  You  will 
easily  understand  how  such  violent 
shocks  to  these  special  nerves  are  com- 
municated to  the  nerves  throughout  the 
entire  body,  and  if  such  shocks  are  re- 
peated, or  long  continued,  the  entire 


104  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 


nervous  system  will  become  shattered 
and  ruined  beyond  all  hope  of  complete 
recovery. 

While  the  nerves  are  thus  being 
ruined,  the  mind  is  also  suffering.  The 
bright  boy  that  stood  at  the  head  of  the 
class  is  losing  his  power  to  comprehend 
and  retain  his  lessons.  His  memory 
fails  him.  His  mind  begins  to  lack 
grasp  and  grip.  He  cannot,  as  formerly, 
take  hold  and  hold  fast.  Gradually  he 
loses  his  place  and  sinks  to  the  foot  of 
his  class.  He  is  no  longer  positive  and 
self-reliant.  He  no  longer  has  his  accus- 
tomed pleasure  in  the  vigorous  romp, 
the  hearty  laugh,  and  good  fellowship 
which  characterize  a boy  with  a vigor- 
ous mind  and  a strong  body. 

While  these  moral  and  mental  changes 
are  taking  place,  the  physical  effects  do 
not  stop  with  the  nerves.  The  health 
declines.  The  eyes  lose  their  luster. 
The  skin  becomes  sallow.  The  muscles 
become  flabby.  There  is  an  unnatural 
languor.  Every  little  effort  is  followed 
by  weariness.  There  is  a great  indiffer- 
ence to  exertion.  Work  becomes  dis- 
tasteful and  irksome.  He  complains  of 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  105 

pain  in  the  back;  of  headache  and  dizzi- 
ness. The  hands  become  cold  and 
clammy.  The  digestion  becomes  poor, 
the  appetite  fitful.  The  heart  palpitates. 
He  sits  in  a stooping  position,  becomes 
hollow-chested,  and  the  entire  body,  in- 
stead of  enlarging  into  a strong,  manly 
frame,  becomes  wasted,  and  many  signs 
give  promise  of  early  decline  and  death. 

These,  my  dear  friend  Harry,  are  some 
of  the  more  prominent  symptoms  and 
effects  of  masturbation  in  boys  and 
young  men  when  the  habit  is  frequently 
indulged,  or  after  being  continued  for  a 
period.  Some  of  these  conditions,  it  is 
true,  may  be  produced  by  other  forms  of 
bodily  disease,  and  on  that  account  the 
unskilled  are  likely  to  misjudge,  but  a 
competent  physician  ought,  at  all  times, 
to  be  able  to  judge  accurately  in  any 
given  case  of  the  cause,  or  causes,  which 
have  produced  such  results. 

One  serious  difficulty  with  all  who  be- 
come addicted  to  this  terrible  and 
destructive  vice  is  that,  while  the  body, 
mind,  and  moral  character  become  weak, 
the  habit  becomes  strong.  The  will 
itself  may  become  so  weak  that  even 


106  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

when  the  person  is  told  of  the  destructive 
nature  and  sad  consequences  of  the  vice, 
he  may  not  even  desire  to  discontinue 
the  practice,  nor  even  really  desire  to 
escape  the  fearful  consequences  which 
are  sure  to  come  later  on;  and  even 
where  there  is  sufficient  manhood  and 
character  left  to  desire  to  be  free,  the  will 
is  often  so  weak  as  to  require  a fierce 
struggle  for  a long  period. 

You  will  see,  from  what  I have  said, 
that  this  secret  vice  is  attended  with  most 
serious  consequences.  But  I have  not 
yet  told  you  the  worst.  If  persisted  in, 
masturbation  will  not  only  undermine, 
but  completely  overthrow  the  health.  If 
the  body  is  naturally  strong,  the  mind 
may  give  way  first,  and  in  extreme  cases 
imbecility  and  insanity  may,  and  often 
do  come  as  the  inevitable  result.  Where 
the  body  is  not  naturally  strong,  a gen- 
eral wasting  may  be  followed  by  con- 
sumption, or  life  may  be  terminated  by 
any  one  of  many  diseases. 

The  terrible  and  helpless  condition  of 
those  upon  whom  this  habit  has  perma- 
nently fastened  itself,  you  may  be  able 
to  judge  from  the  fact  that,  in  order  to 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  107 

prevent  the  repetition  of  the  act  of  mas- 
turbation, and  if  possible  permanently  to 
cure  the  victim  of  this  vice,  boys  often 
have  to  be  put  in  a “ strait-jacket,” 
sometimes  have  their  hands  fastened  be- 
hind their  backs,  sometimes  their  hands 
are  tied  to  the  posts  of  the  bed,  Or  fas- 
tened by  ropes  or  chains  to  rings  in  the 
wall ; and  in  various  other  ways  extreme 
measures  have  to  be  resorted  to  in  the 
effort  to  save  the  individual  from  total 
mental  and  physical  self-destruction. 
And  I am  sorry  to  say  that  even  these 
extreme  measures  are  not  always  suc- 
cessful in  restraining  the  individual  or 
effecting  a cure. 

I think  you  will  see,  my  dear  boy,  how 
important  it  is  that  all  boys  should  be 
duly  warned,  and  in  good  time  also,  of 
the  terrible  results  of  this  destructive 
vice.  You  will  understand  why  your 
own  dear  Papa  should  have  asked  me  to 
continue  and  send  you  further  Talks  in 
the  phonograph,  after  I had  answered 
you  the  question  which  you  asked  of 
your  Mamma,  and  which,  because  of  her 
sickness,  I had  the  honor  of  being  asked 
to  tell  you.  Your  parents  are  too  intelli- 


108  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

gent,  and  love  you  too  much,  to  be  indif- 
ferent to  the  importance  of  these  serious 
questions.  They  have  not  been  willing 
that,  on  account  of  ignorance,  you  should 
be  exposed  to  those  terrible  dangers,  and 
as  this  knowledge  is  imparted  to  you,  and 
as  you  come  to  know  of  the  sad  results 
of  the  sins  into  which  many  previously 
pure-minded  and  well-meaning  boys 
have  fallen  through  ignorance,  you 
should  thank  God  for  the  intelligent  love 
of  your  parents,  and  for  His  kind  provi- 
dence, by  which  you  have  been  kept 
from  this  prevalent  and  destructive  vice. 

Recognizing  what  your  parents  have 
desired  for  you  in  this  matter,  it  will  be 
very  proper  that  to-morrow  night  I 
should  remind  you  what  injustice  would 
be  done  them  and  others,  if  you  were 
ever  to  become  addicted  to  sexual  vice, 
in  this  or  any  other  form. 


CYLINDER  XIII. 


The  Boy  who  Practices  Solitary  Vice  Not  the 
Solitary  Sufferer. — The  Sins  of  Children 
Visited  upon  Their  Parents. — Parents  often 
the  Greatest  Sufferers. — What  Parents  Do 
for  Their  Children. — During  Infancy. — Dur- 
ing Childhood. — Should  Not  Disappoint 
Their  Hopes. — Brothers  and  Sisters  Made  to 
Suffer. — His  Children  after  Him  Must  Suffer 
the  Results  of  His  Sin. — We  Reproduce  Our- 
selves.— Cannot  Transmit  what  We  Do  Not 
Possess. — What  We  Are  That  Our  Children 
Will  Be. — The  Character  of  the  Boys  and 
Girls  of  To-day  Determines  the  Character  of 
the  Nation  a Hundred  Years  to  Come. 

My  Dear  Friend  Harry:  From 
what  I told  you  last  night  and  the  night 
before  you  will  understand  something  of 
the  sad  consequences  of  solitary  vice ; yet 
the  boy  himself  is  not  the  solitary,  or 
only  sufferer.  No  one  can  do  wrong  in 
any  way  without  causing  that  others 
must  also  bear,  at  least  in  some  measure, 
the  results  of  his  sin.  Not  only  are  the 
sins  of  the  parents  visited  upon  the  chil- 

109 


no  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 


dren,  but  the  sins  of  the  children  are  also 
visited  upon  the  parents. 

If  by  your  own  act  you  were  to  impair 
your  health,  enfeeble  your  intellect,  and 
destroy  your  usefulness,  it  is  a question 
whether  your  parents  might  not  be  as 
great  or  even  greater  sufferers  than 
yourself.  Think  for  a moment  of  what 
your  own  parents  have  done  for  you. 
After  Mamma  had  brought  you  into  the 
world  at  the  risk  of  her  own  life,  and  at 
the  cost  of  much  pain  and  suffering,  for 
months  she  gave  herself  almost  wholly 
to  nourishing  and  caring  for  you.  When 
the  various  sicknesses  peculiar  to  child- 
hood came,  she  guarded  you  carefully 
lest  you  should  take  cold  and  die,  or  be 
left  with  impaired  sight  or  hearing,  or  in 
some  other  way  be  caused  to  suffer  dur- 
ing the  remainder  of  your  life  with  some 
physical  infirmity.  When  you  had  the 
scarlet  fever,  for  days  and  weeks  Mamma 
and  Papa  gave  themselves  almost  con- 
stantly to  you.  Day  and  night  they 
watched  over  you,  and  for  months,  for 
fear  of  catching  this  dreadful  disease,  or 
communicating  it  to  others,  no  one  came 
to  the  house;  and  for  your  sake  they 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  HI 


cheerfully  watched  and  suffered  all  with- 
out complaint. 

Ever  since  you  were  born,  they  have 
been  laboring  to  provide  you  every  com- 
fort. They  have  been  careful  about  your 
instruction  and  education.  They  have 
guarded  you  from  evil  companions  and 
dangerous  influences  of  every  sort,  and 
I am  sure  you  will  readily  see  what  a 
disappointment  and  sorrow  it  would  be 
to  them,  if  you  were  to  do  wrong. 
What  a sorrow  to  Papa  and  Mamma  it 
would  be  to  see  their  boy  with  sallow 
face,  glassy  eye,  drooping  form,  without 
energy,  force,  or  purpose,  a laggard  in 
school,  shy,  avoiding  the  society  of 
others,  disliking  good  books,  avoiding 
the  Sunday-school,  and  desiring  to 
escape  from  every  elevating  Christian 
influence.  Nothing  I am  sure  would 
bring  greater  pain  to  the  hearts  of  Papa 
and  Mamma,  than  to  know  that  their 
dear  boy,  whom  they  hoped  to  prepare 
for  great  usefulness,  had  turned  aside 
into  ways  of  sin  and  evil  which  were 
surely  disappointing  all  their  hopes  and 
ruining  their  boy,  both  for  this  world 
and  the  world  to  come. 


1 12  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 


Not  only  to  them,  but  what  a sorrow 
and  regret  would  come  to  that  little 
baby  sister  when  she  should  grow  to 
womanhood,  and  then,  when  she  should 
justly  be  proud  to  turn  to  you  for  coun- 
sel, sympathy,  and  help,  be  humiliated 
to  find  that  you  were  weak,  nervous,  and 
unworthy  of  the  respect  and  love  which 
she  would  under  other  conditions  have 
been  glad  to  have  bestowed  upon  you. 
Not  only  would  you  be  wronging  your 
own  sister,  but  you  would  also  be 
wronging  that  pure,  sweet  girl,  whom, 
in  the  providence  of  God,  we  may 
rightly  trust  is  being  prepared  to  crown 
and  bless  your  manhood,  and  with 
whom  you  cannot  expect  to  be  hon- 
ored and  happy  unless  your  life  has 
been  characterized  by  the  same  purity 
and  honor  which  you  shall  have  a right 
to  expect  of  her. 

But  the  consequences  which  result 
from  masturbation  do  not  stop  with  the 
boy  who  practices  it,  nor  with  his 
parents,  brothers  and  sisters,  friends  and 
relatives,  but  where  such  a boy  lives  to 
become  a man,  if  he  marries,  and  should 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  1 13 

become  a father,  his  children  after  him 
must  suffer  to  some  degree  the  results 
of  his  sin.  If  his  life  has  disqualified 
him  for  thrift,  and  his  children  on  this 
account  are  born  in  poverty,  this  would 
be  one  of  the  results  which  they  would 
suffer.  But  if  his  physical  powers  have 
been  impaired  by  vice,  or  any  other 
cause,  he  cannot  transmit  perfect  physi- 
cal, mental,  and  moral  powers  to  his 
children.  For  neither  physically  nor 
financially  can  a man  transmit  or  give 
to  his  children  that  which  he  does  not 
himself  possess.  As  in  grain  so  in  hu- 
man life,  if  the  quality  of  the  grain  which 
is  sown  in  the  field  is  poor,  the  grain 
that  grows  from  it  will  be  inferior. 
When  a boy  injures  his  reproductive 
powers,  so  that  when  a man  his  sexual 
secretion  shall  be  of  an  inferior  quality, 
his  offspring  will  show  it  in  their  physi- 
cal, mental,  and  moral  natures.  So  you 
see  that  even  a young  boy  may  prepare 
the  way  to  visit  upon  his  children  that 
are  to  be,  the  results  of  vices  and  sins 
committed  long  years  before  they  were 
born.  This  surely  is  a very  impressive 


1 14  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

thought,  and  you  will  see  how  even  the 
little  boys  of  to-day  are  unconsciously 
molding  and  shaping  not  only  the  char- 
acter and  destiny  of  the  children  that  are 
to  come  after  them,  but  how  they  are 
also  shaping  the  history  and  destiny  of 
the  nation.  The  thought  and  conduct, 
the  aspirations  and  ambitions  of  the 
boys  and  girls  in  the  kindergartens  and 
primary  schools  are  to-day  cultivating 
and  developing  in  them  that  life  and 
character  which  will  determine  what 
shall  be  the  dominant  characteristics  of 
this  nation  a hundred  years  to  come. 

I would  that  every  boy  in  the  land 
might  know  these  facts,  so  that  he  might 
intelligently  resolve  to  take  such  care  of 
his  health  that  his  children  might  be 
blessed  with  vigorous  bodies;  that  he 
would  so  exercise  his  mind  that  his  chil- 
dren might  inherit  added  capacity  to 
acquire  knowledge;  and  that  he  would 
so  obey  the  laws  of  morality  that  his 
children  might  inherit  a tend  toward 
virtue,  uprighteousness,  and  religion. 

You  see,  then,  how  important  it  is  that 
nothing  should  be  done  that  will  weaken 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  1 15 

any  of  the  faculties  or  powers  which  God 
has  given  you,  and  to-morrow  night  I 
will  endeavor  to  tell  you  briefly  how 
boys  may  preserve  their  entire  bodies  in 
purity  and  strength. 


PART  IV. 

How  Boys  may  Preserve  their  Entire  Bodies  in 
Purity  and  Strength. 


CYLINDER  'XIV. 


How  Purity  and  Strength  May  Be  Preserved. — 
Our  Space  Not  Sufficient  to  Tell  All. — 
Subject  to  Be  Pursued  in  other  Books. — 
“ Cleanliness  Next  to  Godliness.” — Purity  of 
Mind  and  Body. — A Pure  Heart  the  First  Re- 
quisite.— Guarding  the  Heart. — Danger  from 
Impure  Books. — Purity  of  the  Body. — The 
Weekly  and  Daily  Bath. — The  Rite  of 
Circumcision  as  Related  to  Purity. — Not  only 
the  External,  but  also  the  Internal  Portions 
of  the  Body  to  Be  Kept  Pure. — Emptying 
out  of  Waste  Fluids  and  Solids. — The  Lesson 
Taught  by  the  Fire  in  the  Grate  and  Stove. — 
The  Fire,  or  Combustion,  in  our  Bodies. — 
Smoke  and  Perspiration. — Ashes  and  Waste 
Substances  in  the  Body. — Importance  of 
Emptying  Waste  Pipes  of  the  Body 
Regularly. 

My  Dear  Friend  Harry:  I prom- 
ised to  attempt  to  tell  you  to-night  how 
boys  may  preserve  their  entire  bodies  in 
purity  and  strength. 

In  talking  to  a boy  who  has  been 
blessed  with  parents  as  intelligent  and 
judicious  as  your  Papa  and  Mamma,  I 
cannot  hope  that  all,  or  even  much  that 


120  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

I shall  say  will  be  entirely  new.  I may 
hope,  however,  to  emphasize  by  repeti- 
tion what  your  parents  have  told  you, 
and  thus  by  “ Line  upon  line,  and  precept 
upon  precept  ” confirm  and  deepen  the 
impression  of  duties  and  rules  which  may 
now  seem  very  simple,  but  which  in  later 
years  you  will  recognize  as  both  impor- 
tant and  valuable.  To  tell  you  all  that 
might  be  desirable  upon  this  subject 
would  require  that  we  should  consider  it 
together  each  night  for  several  weeks. 
We  can,  however,  only  give  three  or 
four  evenings  to  this  topic,  and  I hope 
that  later  on  you  will  pursue  it 
further,  by  reading  some  valuable  books 
upon  the  subject.*  I shall  try,  however, 
to  give  you  the  largest  amount  of  infor- 
mation in  the  shortest  time  and  simplest 
way. 

You  have  doubtless  often  heard  it 
said  that,  “ Cleanliness  is  next  to  Godli- 
ness.” True  cleanliness  includes  purity, 

* The  author  would  recommend  such  books  as 
“The  Marvels  of  our  Bodily  Dwelling,”  by  Mrs. 
Mary  Wood- Allen,  M.  D.  Parents  should  place  in 
the  hands  of  their  children  the  best  books  of  this 
class. 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  121 


both  of  body  and  mind.  If  immodest 
and  impure  thoughts  are  permitted  to 
dwell  in  the  mind,  they  will  soon  work 
themselves  out  in  the  life.  The  Bible 
says  of  man,  “ As  he  thinketh  in  his 
heart,  so  is  he.”  Thought  soon  be- 
comes life  and  character.  You  see, 
then,  that  it  is  important  that  we  keep 
our  minds  and  our  thoughts  pure. 

The  most  important  requisite  in  se- 
curing and  keeping  a pure  mind  is  to 
have  a pure  heart,  and  God  alone  can 
give  you  a pure  heart,  and  our  prayer 
should  be  “ Create  in  me  a clean  heart, 
O God;  and  renew  a right  spirit  within 
me  ” (Psalm  li.  io).  The  Bible  says, 
“ Blessed  are  the  pure  in  heart,  for 
they  shall  see  God  ” (Matthew  v.  8). 
If  you  have  not  yet  given  your  heart 
fully  to  the  Saviour,  that  truly  is  your 
first  duty  and  your  only  safety  and  sal- 
vation. When  you  have  this  pure  heart 
which  God  alone  can  give,  it  is  your 
duty  to  guard  it  well.  For  the  Bible's 
injunction  is,  “ Keep  thy  heart  with  all 
diligence;  for  out  of  it  are  the  issues  of 
life  ” (Proverbs  iv.  23). 

That  you  may  properly  guard  your 


122  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW, 

heart,  you  will  need  to  avoid  with  great 
care  all  books  which  are  immodest  or 
impure.  Many,  very  many  books  are 
evil  and  impure  in  character,  and  not  a 
few  are  so  in  purpose.  Never  read, 
handle,  or  listen  to  a book  or  paper 
which  you  might  not  ask  your  Mamma 
or  Papa  to  read  aloud  wjth  you.  In  all 
these  matters,  make  your  parents  your 
counselors  and  protectors.  Turn  away 
in  disgust  from  those  who  would  pollute 
your  mind  with  vile  stories  or  immodest 
conversation.  For  your  companions 
and  associates,  choose  only  the  pure  and 
the  good.  If  such  could  not  be  found, 
it  were  better  to  abide  alone.  It  would 
be  much  easier  for  a bad  companion  to 
pull  you  down  than  for  you  to  lift  him 
up. 

Not  only  the  mind,  but  the  body 
should  be  kept  pure  and  clean.  Every 
person  should  bathe  his  entire  body  at 
least  once  each  week,  and  twice  a week 
is  still  better.  When  a boy,  I began  to 
take  a hand  bath  in  cold  water  each 
morning  before  dressing.  This  soon 
grew  into  a fixed  habit,  and  has  been 
continued  throughout  my  life  with 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  1 23 

great  physical  benefit.  If  begun  in  the 
summer,  there  will  be  no  danger  of  tak- 
ing cold,  and  when  the  cold  water  and 
weather  of  the  winter  come,  the  bath 
will  be  followed  by  a warm  glow  and 
much  invigoration.  After  a good  rub- 
bing with  a coarse  towel,  the  hands 
should  be  used  to  rub  the  entire  body 
vigorously. 

To  insure  the  cleanliness  of  the  sexual 
member,  and  thus  the  more  effectually 
secure  purity,  and  strengthen  virtue 
among  His  chosen  people,  God  insti- 
tuted the  rite  of  circumcision,  which 
was  performed  when  the  male  child 
was  eight  days  old.  This  rite  con- 
sisted in  drawing  forward  and  cutting 
off  the  loose  skin  at  the  end  of  the  sexual 
member.  In  this  way  it  became  easier 
for  the  parent,  and  later  for  the  child,  to 
keep  the  glans,  or  end  of  the  sexual 
member  free  from  the  smegma,  or  soapy 
substance  that  is  liable  to  gather  under 
the  foreskin,  and  which,  if  not  removed, 
will  in  a few  days  set  up  an  irritation, 
and  render  the  child  an  easy  subject  of 
sexual  excitement  and  masturbation. 
When  taking  your  regular  weekly  bath, 


124  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

it  is  always  well  to  draw  the  foreskin 
back  gently  and  cleanse  carefully  that 
portion  of  the  sexual  member.  This 
act  of  cleansing  should  be  done  con- 
scientiously and  religiously,  avoiding 
any  act  which  would  pollute  the  mind  or 
degrade  the  body. 

Not  only  the  exterior,  but  the  interior 
of  the  body  also  is  to  be  kept  pure  by 
being  kept  clean.  The  largest  part  of  the 
impurity  which  is  to  be  washed  from  the 
exterior  of  the  body  consists  of  the  worn 
out  and  wasted  fluids  and  solids  which 
are  passed  out  of  the  body  through  the 
pores  of  the  skin,  mostly  in  the  form 
of  perspiration.  Frequent  bathing  is 
necessary  to  keep  the  pores  open,  so 
that  the  body  may  be  kept  in  good 
health.  But  a large  accumulation  of 
waste  matter,  both  in  the  form  of  fluids 
and  solids,  is  also  cast  out  of  the  body 
in  bulk,  or  in  considerable  quantities,  at 
a single  time. 

How  we  come  to  have  these  waste 
substances  in  the  body,  perhaps  you  will 
best  understand  by  noticing  the  burning 
of  the  fire  in  the  grate  or  stove.  The 
burning  of  the  wood  and  coal  produces 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  125 

heat,  and  if  the  fire  is  to  be  kept  burn- 
ing, fuel  must  be  added  from  time  to 
time.  As  the  fuel  burns  away,  ashes 
accumulate.  A small  quantity  passes 
up  the  chimney  in  the  form  of  smoke, 
and  that  which  remains  in  the  form  of 
ashes  must  be  removed  or  the  grate  will 
be  clogged  up,  the  draught  cut  off,  and 
the  fire  go  out.  The  same  is  true  of  our 
bodies.  The  warmth  of  our  bodies  is 
caused  by  the  changes  effected  in  the 
lungs,  liver,  and  muscles,  by  the  proc- 
esses of  life,  which  in  many  ways  closely 
resemble  the  burning  of  fuel  in  the 
stove.  That  part  which  passes  off 
through  the  pores  in  perspiration  re- 
sembles that  portion  of  the  ashes  which 
passes  up  the  chimney  in  the  form  of 
smoke,  and  that  which  accumulates  as 
fluids  and  solids  in  those  portions  of  our 
bodies  which  God  has  provided  for  their 
reception,  correspond  to  the  ashes  which 
gather  in  the  ash  pan  under  the  grate. 
Now,  if  the  ash  pan  is  not  emptied  daily, 
the  ashes  will  pile  up  until  they  clog 
the  grate,  cut  off  the  draught,  and  put 
out  the  fire.  And  in  like  manner,  if  the 
bladder  and  rectum  are  not  emptied  at 


126  IVHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

proper  intervals,  the  entire  interior  of 
the  body  will  be  stopped  up,  all  the 
offices  of  the  body  will  be  hindered, 
these  offensive  substances  will  be 
clogged  and  retained  in  the  blood,  the 
brain  and  all  portions  of  the  body  will 
feel  dull  and  heavy,  and  if  long  con- 
tinued or  often  repeated,  sickness  and 
disease  will  surely  ‘follow. 

If  you  desire  to  be  strong  and  well, 
empty  the  waste  pipes  of  the  body  regu- 
larly and  faithfully.  The  waste  fluid 
should  always  be  wholly  emptied  out 
the  last  thing  before  getting  into  the  bed 
at  night,  upon  rising  in  the  morning, 
and  at  intervals  of  from  four  to  six  hours 
throughout  the  day.  The  waste  solids 
should  be  emptied  from  the  body  with 
unfailing  regularity  each  day,  and  the 
great  mass  of  cleanly  and  careful  people 
have  found  it  best  to  make  this  the  first 
duty  each  morning  immediately  after 
breakfast.  Without  care  and  regularity 
in  performing  these  two  duties,  good 
health,  a vigorous  body,  and  a clean 
mind  are  altogether  impossible.  In 
order  that  the  inhabitants  of  a house 
may  be  comfortable  and  happy,  it  is  not 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOVY.  127 

enough  that  the  outside  of  the  house 
should  be  nicely  painted,  but  the  inside 
of  the  house  must  be  cleanly  and  pure. 
To  be  healthy  and  happy,  keep  your 
body  clean  and  pure,  both  without  and 
within. 


CYLINDER  XV. 

Slow  Oxidation,  Called  Rusting;  Rapid,  Called 
Burning. — Best  of  Fuel  for  the  Fire  in  Our 
Bodies. — Choice  and  Preparation  of  Food. — 
Discover  what  Foods  Do  Not  Agree  with 
You.  — Abnormal  Appetites.  — What  to 
Drink. — Danger  of  All  Stimulants. — The 
Ruin  Caused  by  Intoxicating  Liquors. — The 
Dangerous  Cigarette. — Tobacco  Universally 
and  Seriously  Injurious  to  Young  Boys. — 
Effect  upon  the  Brain. — Upon  the  Body. — 
Upon  the  Reproductive  Organs. 

My  Dear  Friend  Harry:  Last 
night  I spoke  to  you  of  the  warmth  and 
changes  which  take  place  in  our  bodies 
under  the  figure  of  a fire  in  the  grate  or 
stove.  In  very  many  respects  the  simi- 
larity is  more  of  a fact  than  a figure. 
In  our  bodies,  the  combustion,  or  oxi- 
dation, or  burning,  is  slower,  but  none 
the  less  real.  When  such  oxidation,  or 
burning,  is  slow,  as  in  the  gradual  de- 
struction of  iron  which  is  exposed  to  the 
weather,  we  call  it  rusting;  when  it  pro- 

128 


IVHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  129 

ceeds  rapidly,  as  with  coal  and  wood,  it  is 
called  burning.  The  process  in  both 
instances,  however,  is  the  same.  In  the 
human  body  the  burning  is  not  so  rapid 
as  with  wood,  but  much  more  rapid  than 
the  oxidation  of  iron.  The  Bible  recog- 
nizes this  scientific  fact  where  it  speaks 
of  death  as  a light,  a candle,  or  a lamp. 
In  the  book  of  Job  (xviii.  5)  it  says, 
“ The  light  of  the  wicked  shall  be  put 
out,”  and  in  Proverbs  (xxiv.  20),  “ The 
candle  of  the  wicked  shall  be  put  out,” 
and  in  another  chapter  (xiii.  9),  “ The 
lamp  of  the  wicked  shall  be  put  out.” 

Since  the  important  changes  that  take 
place  in  our  bodies  so  closely  resemble 
the  combustion  of  wood  and  coal,  it  is 
very  proper  that  we  should  inquire  into 
what  kind  of  fuel  should  be  used  to  keep 
this  flame  of  our  physical  life  burning 
most  successfully  and  with  the  best  re- 
sult. 

There  are  so  many  kinds  of  food  that 
it  will  be  impossible  to  speak  of  any  of 
them  separately.  Never  eat  any  but  the 
most  wholesome  foods.  These  should 
be  properly  cooked,  eaten  in  proper 
quantities,  in  sufficient  varieties,  and  at 


130  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

regular  intervals.  Always  observe  care- 
fully the  effects  of  what  you  eat.  If  you 
have  a headache,  a fever,  or  even  when 
you  feel  cross  and  irritable,  inquire  care- 
fully into  the  character  and  quantity  of 
what  you  ate  from  twelve  to  forty-eight 
hours  previously,  and  in  this  way,  by 
observation  and  thoughtfulness,  you 
will  make  many  valuable  discoveries 
concerning  your  own  well-being  and 
health.  Study  thoughtfully  the  many 
rules  of  health  prepared  by  others, 
always  remembering,  however,  that  any 
slight  modification  to  suit  your  own  best 
needs  will  be  dependent  upon  your  care- 
ful observation  and  study  of  your  own 
body.  Never  eat  anything  that  dis- 
agrees with  you  simply  because  it  tastes 
good.  Do  not  live  solely  that  you  may 
eat,  but  eat  solely  that  you  may  live. 

Some  boys,  and  girls,  too,  weaken 
and  disease  their  bodies  by  cultivating 
and  developing  an  unnatural  appetite 
for  vinegar,  salt,  cloves,  coffee,  slate 
pencils,  and  other  substances  which  are 
taken  in  such  form  and  in  such  quanti- 
ties as  to  become  very  injurious  in  many 
ways.  Such  habits,  if  not  early  aban- 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  13 1 

doned,  lead  to  secret  and  social  vice, 
prepare  the  individual  for  intemperance, 
and  pave  the  way  for  permanent  injury, 
or  even  for  total  wreck  and  ruin.  The 
sad  effects  of  such  a course  we  have  our- 
selves witnessed  in  the  lives  of  several 
who  were  boys  and  girls  with  us  years 
ago. 

What  is  true  of  eating  is  true  also  of 
drinking.  Drink  only  that  which  con- 
fers good  health.  Pure  water,  at  the 
temperature  it  flows  from  the  spring,  is 
the  best  form  of  drink  for  both  young 
and  old.  The  boy  who  drinks  tea  and 
coffee  while  he  is  growing  can  never 
grow  to  be  as  large,  muscular,  and  manly 
a man  as  he  would  become  if  he  drank 
only  good,  pure  water.  Tea  and  coffee 
are  stimulants,  and  these  can  never  be 
taken  during  the  growing  years  without 
lessening  the  vitality,  strength,  and 
growth. 

As  you  value  your  health,  happiness, 
usefulness,  and  even  life  itself,  never 
take  intoxicating  liquors  in  any  form. 
Look  about  you  and  see  the  ruin  caused 
by  rum  in  the  lives  of  others.  Learn 
lessons  of  wisdom  by  thoughtful  obser- 


132  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

vation,  rather  than  by  sad  experience, 
and  remember  the  true  teachings  of  the 
Bible  on  this  subject:  “ Wine  is  a 
mocker,  strong  drink  is  raging;  and 
whosoever  is  deceived  thereby  is  not 
wise  ” (Proverbs  xx.  i).  It  also  says 
of  wine  and  strong  drink,  what  you  may 
also  see  about  you,  if  you  are  observant, 
“ At  the  last  it  biteth  like  a serpent,  and 
stingeth  like  an  adder  ” (Proverbs 
xxiii.  32). 

What  I have  said  of  tea  and  coffee  is 
true  also  of  the  effect  of  tobacco,  only  to 
a much  greater  degree.  The  cigarette 
is  small,  looks  harmless,  and  therefore 
presents  to  boys  one  of  the  most  dan- 
gerous and  destructive  forms  of  tempta- 
tion. It  may  be  possible  that  some  few 
men,  who  have  passed  their  thirtieth 
birthday,  whose  bodies  are  fully  ma- 
tured, and  whose  physical  and  mental 
habit  is  naturally  sluggish  and  heavy, 
may  smoke  tobacco  in  moderation  with- 
out seeming  injurious  effects,  but  it  is 
absolutely  certain  that  no  growing  boy 
can  use  tobacco  in  any  form  without 
positive,  immediate,  and  permanent  in- 
jury. Look  carefully  at  the  boys  you 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  133 

meet  who  use  cigarettes.  In  proportion 
as  they  are  addicted  to  the  cigarette, 
they  are  stunted  and  dwarfed  in  their 
muscular  development.  If  you  can  suc- 
ceed in  finding  a single  boy,  who 
smokes  cigarettes  in  any  considerable 
quantity,  whose  muscles  are  well  devel- 
oped and  firm,  whose  skin  is  not  sallow, 
the  white  of  whose  eyes  is  not  clouded 
and  the  surface  glassy,  you  will  have 
discovered  what  many  careful  observers 
among  men  have  failed  to  find.  To- 
bacco always  stunts  and  dwarfs  a grow- 
ing boy,  and  the  effect  upon  the  brain  is 
as  marked  and  serious  as  upon  the  body. 
In  the  schools  and  colleges  careful 
observation  has  demonstrated  that  those 
who  use  tobacco  in  any  form  fall  much 
below  the  average  standing  of  those  in 
the  same  classes  who  do  not  use  tobacco 
at  all.  The  carefully  recorded  develop- 
ment in  height,  weight,  and  intellectual 
capacity  of  students  during  the  four 
years  spent  in  our  colleges,  shows  that 
those  who  do  not  smoke  gain  in  weight 
twenty-four  per  cent,  more  than  those  in 
the  same  classes  who  do  smoke,  in 
height,  thirty-seven  per  cent,  more,  and 


134  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

in  the  size  of  the  chest,  forty-two  per 
cent  more.  What  is  true  in  the  colleges 
is  even  more  marked,  although  less 
noticed  by  actual  test,  in  all  the  primary 
and  preparatory  schools  throughout  the 
land. 

The  use  of  tobacco  seriously  affects 
the  powers  of  the  brain,  the  health  of 
every  organ* of  the  body,  and  especially 
the  healthy  and  vigorous  growth  of  the 
reproductive  system.  If  the  injurious 
effects  which  come  as  the  result  of 
smoking  or  chewing  tobacco  were  limited 
to  the  individual  who  uses  it,  the  conse- 
quences would  not  be  so  bad,  but  when 
we  remember  that,  “We  are  not  separate 
units,  but  are  links  in  a living  chain  of 
endless  transmission,”  we  see  how  any 
injury  done  to  our  own  bodies  must  be 
transmitted  to  the  children  that  come 
after  us.  As  I told  you  some  evenings 
previous,  what  you  are  that  your  chil- 
dren will  most  easily  and  most  naturally 
become,  and  what  you  would  have  them 
to  be,  that,  even  in  your  growing  years, 
you  must  yourself  seek  to  be.  Smoking 
is  not  only  injurious,  but  expensive, 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  135 

and  is  also  attended  with  numerous 
dangers. 

I had  hoped  to  include  in  my  Talk 
to-night  some  subjects  which  we  shall 
be  compelled  to  leave  until  to-morrow 
night.  Till  thsn,  think  on  these  things. 


CYLINDER  XVI. 


God  Intended  Man  to  Work. — Many  Seem  to 
Be  Born  Lazy. — All  Must  Learn  to  Work. — 
Some  Forms  of  Labor  Call  into  Service  only 
a Few  Muscles. — Every  Muscle  Should  Do 
Service.  — Importance  of  Exercise. — The 
Boy’s  Bible  and  Dumb-Bells. — The  Muscles 
Developed  by  Exercise. — This  Not  True  of 
the  Sexual  Member. — Importance  of  Recrea- 
tion.— Difference  between  Exercise  and 
Recreation. — This  Illustrated. — So  much  of 
Zest  and  Pleasure  May  Be  Put  into  Daily 
Duty  as  to  Convert  it  into  Recreation. — 
Daily  Food  and  Daily  Exercise. — Importance 
of  Sufficient  Sleep. — The  Best  Hours  for 
Sleep. 

My  Dear  Friend  Harry:  Purity 
and  strength  of  body  and  mind  cannot 
be  maintained  simply  by  eating  the  best 
and  most  nourishing  kinds  of  food. 
God  has  made  our  bodies  in  such  a way 
that  if  we  would  be  strong,  healthy,  and 
happy,  we  must  also  work.  Even  be- 
fore the  Fall,  God  gave  Adam  and  Eve 
something  to  do.  This  was  necessary 

136 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  137 

for  both  their  health  and  their  happiness. 
They  were  not  to  spend  their  time  in 
idleness.  They  were  put  in  the  garden  of 
Eden  “ To  dress  it  and  to  keep  it.”  By 
nature,  at  first,  none  of  us  like  to  work. 
We  all  seem  to  be  born  lazy,  but  we 
must  be  taught  to  work,  and  should  be 
put  at  it  and  kept  at  it,  at  such  intervals 
as  are  best  suited  to  teach  us  the  art,  and 
enable  us  to  acquire  the  taste  for  work. 
Do  not  shrink  from  doing  the  many 
little  things  which  are  asked  of  you. 
Be  faithful  to  every  duty,  in  school  and 
out  of  it.  And  remember  the  old  and 
valuable  self-evident  truth,  “Whatsoever 
is  worth  doing  at  all  is  worth  doing 
well,  and  if  it  is  not  worth  doing  well, 
it  is  not  worth  doing  at  all.”  Never  be 
ashamed  of  honest  toil.  Dignify  your 
work  by  doing  it  well,  and  you  will  be 
honored  and  blessed  in  the  doing  of  it. 

Some  kinds  of  toil  tax  the  mind  rather 
than  the  body.  Some  other  kinds  tax 
only  a few  muscles  of  the  body,  and 
leave  all  the  others  unused.  In  order 
that  the  blood  may  circulate  freely  to 
every  muscle,  and  that  the  entire  body 
may  be  kept  strong,  it  is  important  that 


138  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW . 

every  muscle  in  the  body  should  be 
called  into  service.  To  secure  this, 
nearly  all  persons  need  exercise.  What 
kind  it  should  be  must  be  determined 
by  the  character  of  the  daily  occu- 
pation. The  boy  who  has  walked  in  the 
furrow  or  followed  the  harrow  all  day 
will  not  need  in  the  evening  to  take  a 
walk  for  exercise.  He  might  enjoy  a 
row  on  the  lake,  or  a swim  in  the  stream, 
or  he  might  be  rested  and  benefited  by 
such  a change  of  labor  as  would  call 
into  service  an  entirely  different  set  of 
muscles.  If  he  were  to  change  to  the 
seat  on  the  corn  planter,  the  reaper,  or 
the  horse  rake,  he  would  rest  one  set  of 
tired  muscles  while  another  set  were 
doing  duty,  and,  by  a simple  change  of 
work,  find  the  needed  rest. 

There  are  but  few  kinds  of  work 
which  call  all  the  muscles  into  service, 
and  therefore,  to  wake  up  the  unused 
powers  and  keep  the  entire  body  strong 
and  well,  all  classes  of  people  can  be 
greatly  benefited  by  some  judicious 
form  of  exercise.  Whenever  I go  into 
a boy’s  room,  I care  not  how  humble  it 
may  be,  if  I find  the  Bible  and  a few 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  139 

well-chosen  books  upon  the  shelf,  and  a 
pair  of  dumb-bells  on  the  floor  in  the 
corner,  I always  feel  that  that  boy’s 
future  is  full  of  hope  and  promise.  A 
pair  of  dumb-bells  weighing  but  two  or 
three  pounds  each  cost  but  a trifle,  but 
are  of  great  value.  If  to  these  can  be 
added  a pair  of  Indian  clubs,  an  exer- 
ciser, and  other  implements,  so  much 
the  better.  The  exercise  can  be  simple, 
but  if  taken  daily,  great  benefit  may  con- 
fidently be  expected. 

We  have  known  of  boys  who  desired 
to  secure  an  earlier  and  larger  develop- 
ment of  the  sexual  member,  and  who 
sought  to  secure  this  result  by  resorting 
to  masturbation.  Such  a course  always 
proves  not  only  a great  sin,  but  a great 
mistake  as  well.  Muscles  may  be  devel- 
oped by  exercise,  but  by  far  the  most 
important  part  of  the  sexual  member  is 
the  great  body  of  nerves  which  center 
and  radiate  from  the  sexual  system,  in  a 
series  of  network  which  stands  related 
to  the  nerves  throughout  the  entire 
body.  Now  instead  of  being  benefited 
or  strengthened  by  such  a process,  these 
nerves  are  impaired,  and  if  this  un- 


140  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW . 

natural  act  is  oft  repeated,  the  nerves  are 
ruined,  and  thus  the  mistaken  and  guilty 
perpetrator  is  made  to  suffer  the  results 
of  the  sin  which  he  has  committed  in 
his  ignorance. 

Not  only  boys  and  girls,  but  men  and 
women  as  well,  need  not  only  to  supple- 
ment work  with  exercise,  but  also  need 
recreation.  There  is  considerable  dif- 
ference between  exercise  and  recreation. 
Genuine  recreation  always  has  in  it  the 
element  of  pleasure.  The  man  who  is 
sawing  wood,  or  breaking  stones  on  the 
pike,  is  having  exercise,  but  there  is  not 
a sufficient  amount  of  amusement  or 
pleasure  in  sawing  wood  or  breaking 
stones,  as  a continuous  daily  occupation, 
to  entitle  either  to  be  ranked  as  a recrea- 
tion. Rolling  a hoop,  batting  a ball,  row- 
ing a boat,  riding  a bicycle,  and  many 
other  things,  have  in  them  a sufficient 
amount  of  pleasure  for  a boy  to  entitle 
them  to  the  rank  of  a recreation.  Rec- 
reation is  always  attended  with  some 
degree  of  exercise,  but  exercise  may  be, 
and  often  is  devoid  of  the  element  essen- 
tial to  a recreation.  The  moment  there- 
fore that  recreation  is  indulged  in  to 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  I41 

such  an  extent  that  it  loses  the  element 
of  exhilaration  and  pleasure,  it  then  be- 
comes either  exercise  or  toil,  according 
to  circumstances.  To  the  child  that  has 
been  confined  for  days  in  the  school- 
room or  the  factory,  an  hour  or  two  in 
the  park  would  be  a genuine  recreation, 
while  to  the  park  police,  whose  duties 
demand  twelve  or  fourteen  hours  each 
day,  the  park  means  work  and  not 
recreation. 

There  are  many  people,  however,  who 
enter  into  their  daily  duties  with  such 
zest  and  pleasure  that  they  actually  con- 
vert their  daily  duties  into  a round  of 
perpetual  recreation.  This  truly  is  the 
best,  as  well  as  the  most  profitable  kind 
of  recreation.  You  will  find  boys  and 
girls  in  the  school  who  take  so  much 
pleasure  in  their  studies  that,  to  them, 
work  virtually  becomes  play.  Such  boys 
and  girls,  and  such  men  and  women, 
are  always  the  healthiest  and  happiest. 
They  make  such  a pleasure  of  business 
that  they  do  not  need  to  make  a busi- 
ness of  pleasure.  My  dear  boy,  if  you 
want  to  be  healthy,  happy,  and  useful  in 
this  world,  learn  to  work,  putting  your- 


142  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

self  into  your  work  with  so  much  ear- 
nestness, thoroughness,  and  enthusiasm 
that  your  high  and  holy  purpose  shall 
convert  the  work  into  play,  or  at  least 
that  it  shall  be  to  you  a joy  and  a delight. 
Do  not  make  the  serious  mistake  of 
going  out  in  search  of  happiness,  for 
then  you  will  never  possess  it,  but  do 
your  duty  faithfully,  and  happiness  will 
find  you.  Happiness  can  overtake  you, 
but  you  can  never  overtake  it. 

Take  your  food  and  your  exercise 
daily.  Take  recreation  as  often  as  you 
need  it,  always,  however,  being  sure  to 
choose  the  best  kinds  of  each.  And 
always  remember  that  even  the  best  may 
be  rendered  harmful  and  injurious  by  an 
inappropriate  time,  an  intemperate  man- 
ner, an  undue  amount,  or  by  bad  asso- 
ciations. 

To  preserve  your  health,  and  secure 
strength  and  vigor,  you  will  need  also  to 
take  plenty  of  sleep.  Eight  hours  of 
sleep  may  be  sufficient  for  many  grown 
people,  but  for  growing  boys  and  girls, 
ten  and  twelve  out  of  every  twenty-four 
hours,  if  taken  at  the  right  time,  is  not 
more  than  is  needed.  Never  sit  up  late, 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  143 

for  the  earlier  hours  of  the  night  are  by 
far  more  valuable  for  sleep  than  the  late 
hours.  Do  not  allow  yourself  to  form 
the  habit  of  lying  in  bed  late  in  the 
morning.  The  old  saying  may  be  very 
common,  but  it  is  very,  very  true,  “Early 
to  bed,  and  early  to  rise,  makes  a man 
healthy,  wealthy,  and  wise.”  Retire 
early.  Do  not  sleep  on  feathers.  Go 
to  bed  to  sleep.  Don’t  worry.  Keep 
your  conscience  clear,  and  the  night  will 
contribute  as  much  to  your  growth, 
strength,  and  vigor  as  the  day. 


CYLINDER  XVII. 


Food  and  Exercise  for  the  Mind. — The  Intel- 
lect May  Be  Starved. — Mind  Fed  through  the 
Eyes,  Ears,  and  other  Senses. — Mental  Food 
Must  Be  Digested  by  Thinking,  Considering, 
and  other  Mental  Processes. — Clean  Food 
for  the  Mind  as  well  as  the  Body. — The 
Mental  Food  Must  Be  of  a Good  Quality. — 
Unwholesome  Reading. — Good  Reading. — 
The  Spiritual  Nature  Must  also  Be  Fed. — 
The  Proper  Food. — Six  Important  Rules  on 
Amusements. 

My  Dear  Friend  Harry:  What  I 
said  to  you  last  night,  and  the  night  be- 
fore, concerning  food,  exercise,  and 
recreation  for  the  maintenance  of  the 
health  of  the  body,  is  also  true  concern- 
ing food,  exercise,  and  recreation  for 
the  health  and  development  of  the  mind. 
The  mind  needs  to  be  nurtured,  or  fed, 
the  same  as  the  body.  The  unused  in- 
tellectual powers  need  to  be  called  into 
exercise,  and  the  mind  also  needs  recre- 
ation in  the  form  of  amusement.  The 
food  for  the  physical  powers  enters  the 
body  through  the  mouth,  while  the  food 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  145 

for  the  brain  enters  the  body  through 
the  eyes,  ears,  and  each  of  the  five 
senses.  If  you  effectually  and  perma- 
nently close  the  mouth,  as  in  the  disease 
known  as  lock-jaw,  the  body  will  starve, 
and  in  like  manner,  if  you  close  the  five 
entrances  or  avenues  to  the  brain,  the 
mind  will  starve.  You  have  seen  many 
people  whose  bodies  were  weak  and 
feeble  because  they  did  not  have  a suffi- 
cient quantity  of  nourishing  food;  and 
in  like  manner  many  people  have  weak, 
feeble  minds  because  these  people  are 
being  starved  intellectually.  As  the 
body  may  be  starved,  not  because  there 
is  a lack  in  the  quantity,  but  in  the 
quality  of  the  food,  so  also  with  the 
mind.  People  may  even  have  food  of  a 
good  quality,  and  yet  eat  it  in  such  a 
manner,  or  in  such  an  excessive  quan- 
tity, that  they  injure  and  disease  the 
stomach,  and  on  this  account  the  body 
starves  even  while  the  stomach  is  full, 
for  you  will  remember  that  it  is  not  the 
quantity  which  we  eat,  but  the  quantity 
which  we  digest  which  nourishes  and 
strengthens. 

In  the  light  of  these  facts  you  will  see, 


14-6  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW . 

how  important  it  is  that  a boy  should 
be  taught  to  become  observant  and 
thoughtful  concerning  all  he  sees  and 
hears,  and  also  concerning  all  the  sensa- 
tions conveyed  to  the  mind  by  means  of 
the  five  senses.  It  is  not  alone  what 
you  see  and  hear  that  will  give  strength 
to  your  mind  and  make  you  intelligent 
and  wise,  but  what  you  think  upon  and 
inwardly  digest  that  will  give  strength 
to  your  intellectual  powers.  When  you 
study,  think  of  what  you  are  studying. 
After  reciting  your  lessons.,  think  of 
what  you  have  learned.  Fully  master, 
or  digest,  what  enters  the  mind,  the  same 
as  you  digest  what  enters  the  stomach, 
in  order  that  it  may  become  a part  of 
yourself. 

Be  very  careful  upon  what  you  feed 
the  mind.  As  you  would  not  allow 
dirty  food  to  enter  your  mouth,  so  do 
not  allow  impurity  to  be  poured  into 
your  mind  either  from  books,  papers,  or 
the  lips  of  others.  Guard  your  stomach, 
but  guard  your  mind  also. 

As  you  have  seen  people  who  were 
starved  and  weak  because  their  food  was 
not  nourishing,  so  you  and  I have  seen 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  147 

boys  who  were  great  readers;  they 
even  neglected  important  duties  in  order 
that  they  might  read,  and  on  the  street, 
in  the  cars,  in  the  schoolroom  they  were 
reading,  reading  all  the  time,  and  yet 
instead  of  becoming  intelligent,  their 
minds  were  undisciplined,  and  they 
were  uninformed  and  ignorant.  The 
trouble  was  not  that  they  did  not  read, 
but  that  which  they  did  read  was  not 
wholesome  reading,  and  the  mind 
starved  and  grew  weaker  from  day  to 
day,  and  year  to  year. 

As  I told  you  in  an  earlier  Talk  that 
you  could  not  injure  the  body  without 
impairing  the  mind,  so  neither  can  you 
starve,  defile,  or  injure  the  mind  with- 
out injuring  the  body  as  well.  Read 
histories  and  biographies.  Read  about 
the  sciences  and  arts.  Read  of  travels 
and  explorations.  Read  about  morals 
and  religion,  but  do  not  read  stories  and 
trash.  The  world  is  too  full  of  good 
books,  and  there  are  too  many  things  in 
the  realm  of  the  actual  and  the  real, 
concerning  which  you  cannot  afford  to 
be  ignorant,  to  permit  of  the  reading  of 
worthless  books. 


148  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

As  you  have  an  intelligent  nature 
which  must  be  fed,  so  you  have  a moral 
and  spiritual  nature  which  must  be  fed. 
As  the  body,  when  in  health,  hungers 
for  food,  and  the  mind  for  knowledge, 
so  a healthy  spiritual  nature  reaches 
out  after  God  and  after  spiritual  truths, 
and  if  you  were  to  deny  yourself  the 
Christian  influences  of  your  home,  of 
the  Sunday-school,  the  Church,  the 
Bible,  good  religious  books,  and  the 
companionship  of  Christian  people,  your 
spiritual  nature  would  be  starved,  be- 
come weak  and  unworthy  of  one  whom 
God  has  created  in  His  own  likeness  and 
in  His  own  image.  Feed  your  physical 
nature,  but  feed  your  intellectual  and 
moral  natures  also. 

As  amusements  bear  to  the  mind 
somewhat  the  same  relation  that  recrea- 
tion bears  to  the  body,  it  is  proper  that 
I should  speak  of  it  here.  There  are 
many  forms  of  amusement.  Some  are 
unobjectionable,  some  questionable,  and 
many  positively  bad.  I cannot  now  par- 
ticularize, but  can  state  safe  principles 
for  government  in  such  matters. 

First.  Never  engage  in  any  amuse- 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  149 


ment  that  imposes  upon  you  an  extrava- 
gant outlay  of  money.  Amusement  is  a 
mere  diversion,  and  to  be  good  it  must 
not  call  for  a large  outlay  of  anything  so 
valuable. 

Second.  It  should  be  of  such  a char- 
acter as  to  furnish  the  very  diversion 
and  relaxation  which  your  condition 
demands — it  should  not  be  engaged  in 
simply  for  fun. 

Third.  Your  amusement  should  not 
interfere  with  the  rights  of  others,  or  put 
a cause  of  stumbling  in  their  path. 

Fourth.  The  amusement  which  be- 
comes so  fascinating  that  those  who 
engage  in  it  neglect  family  or  religious 
duties,  or  business  obligations,  is  a 
dangerous  amusement  and  should  be 
avoided. 

Fifth.  Any  amusement  which  sends 
those  who  engage  in  it  to  their  duties 
the  next  day  with  a distaste  for  the  ordi- 
nary duties  of  life,  that  turns  the  thought 
of  the  apprentice  boy  from  the  tools  be- 
cause they  are  not  swords;  the  smithy’s 
boy  from  his  leather  apron  because  it  is 
not  a prince’s  cloak;  and  the  herdsman 
from  his  cattle  because  they  are  not  in- 


150  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW, 

furiated  beasts  or  fighting  bulls  of  the 
arena  is  harmful  and  wholly  injurious. 

Sixth.  The  amusement  which  casts  a 
reproach  upon  virtue,  that  suggests 
doubt  about  religion  or  sacred  things, 
that  would  make  you  think  less  of  your 
home,  that  arrays  vice  in  attractive  robes, 
arouses  passion,  or  benumbs  the  moral 
sense  is  a dangerous  amusement  and  is 
to  be  avoided. 

In  the  matter  of  amusements  be 
thoughtful,  conscientious,  and  careful. 

As  work  may  be  engaged  in  with  such 
zest  and  pleasure  as  to  convert  daily  toil 
into  perpetual  recreation,  so  study,  read- 
ing, and  mental  effort  may  be  entered 
upon  with  such  enthusiasm  and  pleas- 
ure as  to  carry  into  all  mental  employ- 
ment and  effort  that  very  element 
which  makes  amusement  attractive  and 
beneficial. 

If  we  bring  the  right  mind  and  temper 
to  our  work,  neither  recreation  nor 
amusement  will  afford  us  any  undue 
temptation  or  expose  us  to  serious 
danger. 


PART  V. 


Our  Duty  to  Aid  Others  to  Avoid  Pernicious 
Habits  and  to  Retain  or  Regain  their  Purity  and 
Strength, 


CYLINDER  XVIII. 


The  Superior  Surroundings  of  Some. — Larger 
Blessings  Mean  Larger  Responsibilities. — 
Our  Duty  to  Those  Who  Are  Less  Favorably 
Situated. — Duty  of  the  Rescued  to  Those 
Still  in  Danger. — Many  Sin  Because  Never 
Warned. — Those  Who  Are  Neglected  Will 
Become  Enemies  to  Themselves,  to  Society, 
and  to  the  State. — Bad  Boys  are  Active  ; 
Why  Should  Not  Good  Boys  beActive  Also  ? — 
Ways  of  Approach  Open  to  Boys. — Saved 
Before  They  Sin. — Serving  the  Suffering,  or 
Saving  from  Suffering. — Remove  Danger 
from  the  Paths  of  Others. 

My  Dear  Friend  Harry:  After  what 
I have  said  in  these  Talks  I am  sure  that 
such  an  intelligent  boy  as  I have  taken 
you  to  be  will  be  grateful  for  the  kind 
Providence  which  gave  you  being  and 
place  in  a home  where  kind  and  wise 
parents  have  guarded  you  from  the  evils 
and  sad  consequences  which  pollute  and 
degrade  the  lives  of  so  many  boys.  You 
should  therefore  remember  that  wherein 
we  are  better  than  others  is  due  not  to 
153 


( 


154  W HA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW \ 

ourselves,  but  to  our  kind  heavenly 
Father,  who  has  placed  us  where  influ- 
ences and  friends  have  helped  us  to  be- 
come better  than  some  others.  If  they 
had  enjoyed  our  privileges  and  advan- 
tages perhaps  they  would  be  all  that  we 
are.  And  may  it  not  also  be  true  that 
if  we  had  been  born  in  the  midst  of  the 
influences  which  have  surrounded  them, 
possibly  we  would  be  quite  like  they  are? 
But  do  you  not  know  that  the  advan- 
tages and  blessings  which  you  have  en- 
joyed place  you  under  obligations  to 
other  boys  who  are  ignorant  or  sinful, 
and  who  must  suffer  the  sad  conse- 
quences of  their  ignorance  and  vice 
unless  you  and  I try  to  do  for  them  what 
others  have  done  for  us.  Do  you  not 
see  that  if  you  had  been  sleeping  in  the 
midst  of  enemies  who  have  plotted  to 
injure  and  destroy  you,  and  some  kind 
friend  had  defeated  their  purpose  and 
saved  you  by  awakening  you  out  of 
sleep,  that  when  you  look  and  see  the 
enemies  and  the  injuries  which  you  have 
escaped,  and  then  find  that  others  can 
only  be  saved  from  what  you  have  es- 
caped if  someone  shall  also  arouse  and 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  *55 

awaken  them,  do  you  not  see  that  both 
your  gratitude  and  duty  demand  that  you 
should  do  for  others  what  kind  friends 
have  done  for  you?  Manifestly  it  is  our 
duty  to  awaken,  warn,  and  save  all  who 
are  exposed  to  pollution  and  sin,  and  to 
do  all  we  can  to  rescue  and  save  the 
vicious.  Many  sin  in  these  matters  sim- 
ply because  no  one  has  warned  them  of 
the  evil  consequences  of  such  a course. 

The  future  condition  of  multitudes  of 
boys  depends  upon  what  shall  be  done 
for  them  in  these  matters.  If  they  are 
warned  and  made  intelligent  they  will 
become  honorable  and  useful  citizens. 
But  if  no  one  cares  to  save  them,  bad 
men  and  bad  boys  will  exert  over  them 
such  influences  as  will  make  them  ene- 
mies to  themselves,  to  society  at  large, 
and  to  the  state  and  nation.  If  they  are 
to  be  saved  they  must  be  saved  while 
they  are  young  and  before  habits  of  vice 
have  become  fixed.  They  must  be  helped 
to  see  that  vice  in  any  form  is  an  enemy 
to  their  own  happiness  and  well-being, 
and  be  made  to  feel  that  the  practice  is 
hateful  in  the  eyes  of  pure  and  good 
people  and  sinful  in  the  sight  of  God. 


156  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

Bad  boys  and  men  are  active  in  their 
efforts  to  lead  others  astray.  They  lose 
no  opportunity  to  scatter  evil  thoughts 
and  vicious  practices,  and  why  should 
not  you  and  all  good  people  seek  to 
spread  such  useful  and  helpful  informa- 
tion as  will  assist  to  save  others  from 
sin,  from  physical  and  mental  weakness, 
and  perhaps  from  utter  ruin. 

Boys  find  ways  of  approaching  other 
boys  upon  this  subject  which  are  not 
open  to  older  persons.  Being  yourself 
a boy  you  can  approach  other  boys  upon 
this  subject,  and  especially  when  subjects 
of  this  kind  are  first  mentioned  or  al- 
luded to  by  them.  If  you  can  save  a 
single  boy  from  sin  and  vice  you  will 
have  done  a good  work.  To  rescue  one 
who  has  already  gone  wrong  is  to  do 
a good  service,  but  do  you  not  see  that 
to  have  saved  that  individual  from  even 
beginning  such  wicked  and  hurtful  prac- 
tices would  be  very  much  better?  It  is 
very  much  as  if  I should  go  to  the  home 
of  a poor  man  and  minister  to  him  day 
and  night  for  weeks  while  he  was  suffer- 
ing great  bodily  pain  because  of  broken 
bones  or  injuries  received  from  a fall 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  157 

caused  by  stepping  upon  a banana  skin 
which  some  thoughtless  person  had 
thrown  upon  the  pavement.  If  I were 
thus  to  care  for  him  in  his  suffering  and 
distress  I would  surely  be  doing  a good 
service.  But  do  you  not  see  that  I would 
be  doing  a service  that  is  much  easier  for 
me  and  far  more  beneficial  to  my  poor 
neighbor  if,  when  I passed  down  the 
street  just  ahead  of  him,  I had  shoved 
the  banana  skin  from  the  pavement  and, 
with  a single  little  effort,  removed  from 
his  way  the  possibility  of  falling?  The 
work  of  saving  him  from  falling  would 
be  both  easier  and  grander  than  any- 
thing I could  do  in  ministry  and  service 
after  he  had  suffered  the  injury  which 
a little  forethought  on  my  part  might 
have  prevented. 

So  you  may  seek  to  remove  evil  and 
danger  from  the  paths  of  other  boys,  and 
especially  from  those  younger  than  your- 
self. Never  expose  a boy  to  ridicule 
lest  you  break  down  that  sense  of 
shame  which  must  prove  helpful  to  him 
when  he  would  reform  and  amend,  and 
lest,  being  exasperated,  he  should  be- 
come reckless  and  defiant  to  all  sense 


153  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW \ 

of  modesty  and  shame.  Recommend 
such  boys  to  read  books  that  will  be 
helpful  to  them,  such  as  “ Kapff’s  Ad- 
monitions ” 1;  “ Almost  a Man,”  2 by  Dr. 
Mary  Wood-Alien;  “ Confidential  Talks 
with  Young  Men,”  3 by  Dr.  Lyman  B. 
Sperry. 

In  order  that  you  may  be  intelligent 
upon  this  subject  and  be  qualified  to  sug- 
gest and  advise  others  to  whom  you  may 
come  with  helpful  sympathy,  before  con- 
cluding these  Talks  I desire  to-morrow 
night  to  suggest  to  you  some  of  the  most 
helpful  things  to  be  done  by  those  who 
would  make  an  effort  to  regain,  as  far 
as  possible,  what  they  have  lost  through 
their  ignorance  or  willful  sin  in  these 
matters.  And  then  I must  bring  these 
Talks  to  a close  by  telling  something  of 
the  changes  which  you  must  expect  in 
your  own  body  in  the  course  of  a few 
years,  and  thus  prepare  you  for  experi- 
ences and  guard  you  against  dangers 
that  lie  in  your  path  further  on. 

1 A 50-cent  book.  2 A 25 -cent  booklet. 

3 A 75-cent  book.  All  may  be  had  direct  from  the 
Vir  Publishing  Company,  1134  Real  Estate  Trust 
Building,  Philadelphia,  Pa. 


PART  VL 


How  Purity  and  Strength  May  Be  Measurably 
Regained* 


CYLINDER  XIX. 


Purity  and  Strength,  How  Regained. — Perfec- 
tion of  Cure  Dependent  upon  the  Extent  of 
the  Hurt  and  Method  of  the  Cure. — The 
Erring  Have  Much  to  Hope  for. — Human 
Effort  and  Divine  Help.  — Importance  of 
Rules  already  Suggested.  — Months  and 
Years  Needed. — ’Importance  of  the  Bath. — 
Consult  Parents  and  Competent  Physician. — 
Unnatural  Modesty  in  These  Matters. — All 
Parts  to  be  Held  in  Purity  of  Thought. — Im- 
portant Suggestions  Concerning  Exercise, 
Sleep,  Diet,  etc. — Seek  Daily  Help  from 
£od. 

My  Dear  Friend  Harry:  In  har- 
mony with  my  promise  I desire  to-night 
to  tell  you  how  purity  and  strength  may 
be  measurably  regained  by  those  who 
have  learned  the  vicious  habit  which  is 
so  prevalent  among  boys.  How  fully 
a boy  who  has  practiced  self-pollution 
may  regain  his  full  vigor  will  depend 
upon  the  extent  to  which  he  has  be>* 
come  addicted  to  the  practice.  I think 
I may  best  illustrate  by  saying  th^ 

x6i 


162  IVHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

the  results  will  be  quite  like  it  is  when 
one  has  received  a hurt  or  injury  on  the 
hand  or  any  other  portion  of  the  body. 
In  most  instances  the  hurt  may  be 
healed,  but  the  perfection  of  the  cure 
will  be  dependent  upon  the  extent  of  the 
injury  and  the  wisdom  displayed  in  ef- 
fecting the  cure.  No  portion  of  the  body 
which  has  suffered  an  injury  can  ever 
after  become  absolutely  what  it  was  be- 
fore the  hurt,  for  even  when  the  finger 
is  simply  cut  by  a sharp  blade  the  cut 
may  be  healed  in  a few  days,  but  for 
years  and  perhaps  for  life  the  individual 
must  carry  the  scar  which  remains  after 
the  wound  is  healed;  and  the  size  of  the 
scar  will  depend  upon  the  extent  of  the 
hurt  or  injury. 

Much  as  the  sin  is  to  be  regretted  and 
deplored,  yet  when  a boy  awakens  to 
the  importance  of  a sincere  and  perma- 
nent reformation  he  is  to  be  encouraged 
to  hope  for  and  to  expect  most  grati- 
fying results  if  he  will  but  go  to  God 
and  confess  his  sin,  seek  God’s  pardon 
for  the  past,  accept  of  Christ  as  his 
Saviour  and  Helper,  and  trust  Him  fully 
in  his  struggle  to  overcome  both  his  sin 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  1 63 

and  its  consequences.  Great  results 
may  be  expected  if  the  individual  co- 
operates and  works  with  God  in  this 
matter.  But  if  human  purpose  and  effort 
are  wanting  God  will  be  prevented  from 
doing  what  He  would.  Neither  God 
nor  man  can  successfully  work  alone  in 
such  matters.  The  human  effort  and 
the  divine  help  must  go  together. 

All  that  I said  to  you  a few  nights  ago, 
concerning  how  boys  may  preserve  their 
entire  bodies  in  purity  and  strength,  is 
of  great  importance  to  boys  who  would 
escape  from  sin  and  endeavor  to  regain 
what  they  have  lost.  Carefully  recall 
what  I said  to  you  on  Cylinders  num- 
bered fourteen,  fifteen,  sixteen,  and  sev- 
enteen. In  order  that  the  impression 
made  upon  the  mind  by  what  I told  you 
then  may  be  deepened,  place  these  cyl- 
inders upon  the  phonograph  again  and, 
after  listening  to  them,  write  down  what 
I said  in  reference  to  purity  of  heart  and 
mind,  cleanliness  of  the  body,  without 
and  within,  the  character  of  all  that  wa 
put  into  our  bodies  in  the  form  of  food 
and  drink,  the  importance  of  avoiding 
stimulants  of  all  kinds,  the  necessity  of 


164  wha  t a young  boy  ought  to  know. 

work,  the  value  of  exercise,  recreation, 
amusement,  and  sleep,  and  the  necessity 
also  for  suitable  food  for  the  intellectual 
and  moral  natures.  Everything  spoken 
of  on  these  cylinders  is  very  important  to 
one  who  desires  to  become  strong  and 
to  retain  or  regain  full  mastery  over  self. 
Emphasizing  everything  said  on  these 
cylinders,  there  are  some  directions 
which  need  to  be  somewhat  enlarged 
upon  to  one  who  desires  to  escape  from 
this  evil  habit  and  regain  what  has  been 
lost. 

What  one  seeks  who  is  in  this  condi- 
tion, and  what  is  worth  all  it  will  cost, 
cannot  be  secured  in  a week,  or  a month, 
or  even  in  an  entire  year.  The  matter 
of  the  largest  and  best  physical  develop- 
ment is  the  result  of  years  of  careful  and 
persistent  physical  culture.  The  bath  is 
of  first  importance.  To  the  regular 
weekly  bath  should  by  all  means  be 
added  the  daily  morning  hand  bath  in 
cold  water,  and  if  the  sexual  parts  are 
feverish  or  sensitive,  good  results  may 
be  secured  by  adding  to  these  a local 
bathing  of  the  parts  in  cold  water  before 
retiring  in  the  evening.  By  placing  the 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  165 

bowl  upon  the  floor  and  crouching  over 
it  in  a sitting  posture,  the  bath  may  be 
most  successfully  administered.  Only 
in  the  summer  can  baths  in  cold  water, 
in  the  morning  and  evening,  be  begun 
without  the  need  of  great  caution  to  pre- 
vent taking  cold.  But  after  the  body  is 
once  accustomed  to  the  application  of 
cold  water,  the  bath  itself  will  fortify  the 
system  against  taking  cold  by  ordinary 
exposure. 

Where  the  glans,  or  end  of  the  sexual 
member,  is  sensitive  and  difficulty  is  ex- 
perienced in  keeping  it  clean,  or  in  sub- 
duing the  irritation,  the  boy  should  seek 
the  advice  of  his  parents,  who  should 
consult  a judicious  Christian  physician 
who  will  be  competent  to  give  the  boy 
the  sympathy,  counsel,  and  treatment 
which  his  particular  case  may  demand. 
In  many  cases  of  this  kind,  circumcision, 
which  is  a very  simple  surgical  operation, 
is  the  only  effective  and  permanent  cure 
for  the  difficulty. 

As  a boy  would  go  to  his  parents  if  he 
had  hurt  himself  by  any  misfortune  or 
was  suffering  from  a fever,  so  he  should 
go  to  them  when  injury  or  sickness 


166  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

attacks  him  in  his  sexual  members.  The 
feeling  which  restrains  most  boys  at  such 
times  is  an  unnatural  modesty,  or  is  the 
result  of  evil  practices  or  vicious  think- 
ing.  There  is  no  reason  why  we  may 
not  properly  speak  of  this  portion  of  our 
bodies  as  of  any  other  portion.  Let  us 
remember  that  God  made  all  parts  of 
our  bodies  and  that  all  parts  are  alike 
sacred.  Neither  these  members  them- 
selves nor  references  to  them  are  un- 
clean or  improper  until  the  individual 
makes  them  so  by  his  own  acts.  Every 
boy  who  has  kind  parents  owes  it  to 
them,  to  his  own  present  comfort  and 
future  happiness  and  usefulness,  that  his 
parents  and  family  physician  should  be 
immediately  informed  of  any  sickness  or 
infirmity  which  may  afflict  him. 

If  I were  speaking  to  a boy  who  was 
desirous  of  escaping  from  this  vice,  in 
addition  to  what  I have  said  to  you  dur- 
ing the  previous  evenings  I would  say 
to  him:  Take  plenty  of  exercise  in  the 
open  air.  This  should  be  done  sys- 
tematically and  regularly;  not  a little 
now  and  then,  but  daily,  and  for  a suffi- 
cient length  of  time  to  produce  some 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  167 

sense  of  weariness.  Engage  the  mind 
also.  Avoid  all  stories  and  trashy  books 
and  papers,  but  read  plenty  of  good  ones. 
Compel  the  mind  to  be  attentive.  At 
the  end  of  each  page  or  paragraph  stop 
and  recall  what  you  have  just  been  read- 
ing about.  When  you  reach  the  end, 
turn  back  and  review  each  chapter. 
Discipline  both  your  body  and  your 
mind.  Teach  both  body  and  mind  to 
obey  the  will.  This  is  very  important, 
for  the  effort  develops  character,  gen- 
ders strength,  and  makes  a boy  masterly 
and  masterful. 

Sleep  on  a hard  bed  in  a properly  ven- 
tilated room.  Let  the  covers  be  slightly 
deficient,  rather  than  overmuch.  Do 
not  sleep  on  your  back.  Avoid  feather 
beds,  either  to  lie  upon  or  as  a covering, 
except  in  the  most  extreme  climate  and 
under  the  most  extreme  circumstances. 
Sleep  apart  in  a bed  by  yourself.  Do 
not  choose  cushioned  chairs.  Avoid 
horseback  riding.  Abstain  from  stimu- 
lants in  all  forms,  including  tea  and 
coffee ; cocoa  and  chocolate  are  much  to 
be  preferred.  To  all  boys  and  men  suf- 
fering from  sexual  irritation  and  weak- 


l68  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW . 

ness  intoxicating  liquors  of  all  kinds, 
and  tobacco  in  every;  form,  are  specially 
injurious. 

Be  careful  about  the  diet.  Milk  and 
vegetable  foods  are  most  favorable  to  a 
mastery  of  sexual  sensitiveness,  but  a 
moderate  quantity  of  fresh  meat  should 
be  used  to  prevent  weakness  and  de- 
bility. Fresh  fish  are  good,  but  eggs 
should  be  used  with  due  moderation. 
Pork  is  bad;  salt  meats  are  difficult  to 
digest,  and  are  not  nutritious.  Pepper, 
pickles,  and  condiments  are  to  be 
avoided.  Pies  and  cakes  disorder  the 
stomach  and  result  in  injury  on  that 
account.  Candy,  if  it  be  eaten  at  all, 
should  be  eaten  in  moderation  and  not 
beween  meals.  Be  careful  that  the 
trousers  are  not  made  to  press  too  tightly 
against  the  sexual  organs  because  of  sus- 
penders that  are  too  short.  Shun  sinful 
companions.  Turn  from  evil  pictures. 
Avoid  the  temptations  which  are  occa- 
sioned by  being  much  alone.  Seek  the 
companionship  of  the  good.  Aspire  to 
some  high  and  holy  purpose  in  life;  ask 
God’s  help  daily,  and  press  forward,  re- 
gaining depleted  powers;  be  daunted  by 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  169 

no  difficulties,  persevere,  and  God  will 
help,  and  the  victory  and  blessing  which 
await  will  be  yours. 

This,  my  dear  boy,  would  be  my  advice 
to  any  boy  who  would  turn  his  back 
upon  the  wicked  past  and  turn  his  face 
hopefully  to  the  future. 


PART  VU 

The  Age  of  Puberty,  and  its  Attendant  Changes. 


CYLINDER  XX. 

The  Passage  from  Infancy  to  Manhood.— 
Physical  and  Mental  Changes  that  Occur  at 
the  Age  of  Puberty. — Meaning  of  the  Term 
“Puberty.”  — The  Dormant  or  Sleeping 
Powers. — They  Awake  and  Fully  Mature  by 
the  Time  We  Need  Them. — From  Fourteen 
to  Twenty-five  the  Man  is  Maturing. — Prior 
to  Puberty  Boys  and  Girls  Much  Alike  in 
Characteristics. — At  Fourteen  the  Manly 
Characteristics  Begin  to  Develop.  — The 
New  and  Embarrassing  Experiences. — The 
Divinely  Implanted  Nature  Awakes. — The 
Attendant  Dangers.  — How  the  Boy  Is 
Affected. — It  Is  the  Period  of  “ Storm  and 
Stress.” — Dangers  which  Arise  from  Igno- 
rance.—Importance  of  Intelligence. 

My  Dear  Friend  Harry:  Not  many 
years  ago  the  cradle  in  which  your  baby 
sister  sleeps  was  yours.  But  to-day  you 
have  passed  on  beyond  the  cradle  and 
are  pressing  forward  toward  manhood 
and  a life  of  usefulness,  honor,  and  bless- 
ing. For  just  a few  years  you  will  con- 
tinue to  be  a boy,  and  then,  at  about  the 
173 


174  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

age  of  fourteen  or  fifteen,  you  will  enter 
upon  a period  of  several  years  during 
which  time  those  portions  of  the  repro- 
ductive system  which  are  hidden  away 
in  the  interior  and  lower  portions  of  your 
body  will  begin  to  develop,  and  you 
will  experience  emotions  which  indicate 
changes  that  will  be  altogether  new 
and  strange.  The  physical  and  mental 
changes  that  occur  at  that  time,  and  the 
conditions  which  attend  them,  to  many 
boys  prove  a time  of  great  mystery,  per- 
plexity, and  danger.  That  this  chang- 
ing condition  may  not  come  upon  you 
unawares,  but  that  you  may  meet  it  with 
intelligent  understanding,  I desire  to  tell 
you  in  advance  something  concerning 
that  period  in  the  life  of  every  boy  which 
is  called  “ the  age  of  puberty.”  In 
speaking  of  plants,  the  word  “ puberty  ” 
means  the  period  when  the  plant  first 
begins  to  bear  flowers.  In  boys  it  is  the 
period  in  which  the  reproductive  or 
sexual  organs  begin  to  develop  and 
sexual  fluid  first  begins  to  form  in  the 
glands  situated  in  the  interior  and  lower 
portion  of  the  body. 

When  we  are  born  into  the  world  as 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  175 

helpless  infants,  God  does  not  immedi- 
ately give  us  all  the  powers  and  endow- 
ments which  we  shall  need  later  on,  but 
for  which  we  at  that  time  have  no  use. 
But  these  powers  He  gives  us  as  we  have 
need  of  them.  At  first  the  baby  has  no 
need  of  teeth,  but  after  a year  or  two 
God  gives  it  a few,  and  then  adds  others, 
from  time  to  time,  as  there  is  necessity. 
When  the  child  is  born  the  beginnings 
of  the  teeth  are  hidden  under  the  gums. 
They  are  in  embryo,  as  learned  men  say, 
awaiting  the  appointed  time  to  grow, 
when  the  child  is  older  and  has  use  for 
them.  In  this  same  way  the  reproduc- 
tive system  in  all  healthy  children  re- 
mains undeveloped,  in  embryo,  dormant, 
or  sleeping  until  the  age  of  about  four- 
teen or  fifteen,  when  this  system  begins 
to  awake  and  grow,  and  various  changes 
begin  to  take  place  which  are  gradually, 
through  a period  of  years,  to  lift  and 
change  the  boy  from  a child  into  the 
fully  developed  man. 

These  changes,  which  take  place  be- 
tween the  age  of  fourteen  and  twenty- 
five,  but  which  are  most  marked  and 
most  trying  between  the  ages  of  fourteen 


176  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

and  eighteen,  are  very  important,  and, 
as  many  in  their  ignorance  and  lack  of 
knowledge  fall  into  vice  and  sin  and 
come  to  early  or  eventual  ruin,  it  is  im- 
portant that  all  boys  should  know  what 
to  expect,  so  that  they  may  interpret  to 
themselves  the  true  meaning  of  their 
new  experiences  and  trying  conditions. 

The  greatest  outward  or  visible 
changes  take  place  rapidly,  requiring  but 
a year  or  two  to  effect  very  noticeable 
results.  But  the  most  critical  period, 
during  which  the  greatest  internal  and 
invisible,  physical  and  mental  changes 
are  taking  place  is,  at  least  in  most 
instances,  from  fourteen  to  twenty-one, 
but  the  changes  are  not  fully  completed 
and  full  sexual  maturity  attained  until 
the  age  of  about  twenty-five. 

During  the  earlier  years  of  life,  while 
the  reproductive  organs  are  dormant 
and  undeveloped,  boys  and  girls  are 
much  alike  in  most  of  their  physical  and 
mental  traits.  But  at  about  the  age  of 
fourteen — with  some  earlier  and  with 
others  later — as  they  approach  the  period 
of  puberty,  the  characteristics  and  traits 
peculiar  to  the  sex  begin  to  develop,  the 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  I’ll 

boys  becoming  more  manly  and  the  girls 
becoming  more  womanly. 

When  this  time  arrives  the  boy  begins 
to  leave  behind  him  the  characteristics 
of  childhood.  The  body  grows  rapidly. 
The  shoulders  become  broader,  the 
chest  deeper.  The  voice  loses  its  boyish 
tones  and  becomes  deeper  and  stronger. 
The  skin  becomes  coarser.  The  beard 
starts  to  grow.  The  bones  become 
harder.  The  sexual  parts  begin  to  de- 
velop, and  in  a few  years  the  wisdom 
teeth  appear. 

At  first  the  boy  feels  awkward.  His 
voice  breaks.  His  hands  and  his  feet 
seem  to  be  in  his  way.  He  is  sensitive 
and  bashful  under  circumstances  where 
formerly  he  was  at  ease  and  at  home. 
He  becomes  the  subject  of  new  sensa- 
tions and  new  desires,  which  he  is  not 
able  to  interpret  or  to  comprehend.  He 
becomes  more  polite,  and  more  manly 
in  his  bearing  toward  strangers,  and  es- 
pecially toward  women.  He  begins  to 
seek  the  companionship  of  girls  of  about 
his  own  age.  All  this  time  there  is  being 
awakened  and  quickened  within  him  a 
divinely  implanted  nature,  which  is  de- 


178  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

signed  to  make  him  more  noble  and 
more  perfect  in  every  respect  than  he 
could  possibly  be  without  it. 

But  it  is  now  that  sexual  passion  be- 
gins to  assert  itself.  If  the  boy  is  igno- 
rant, has  a weak  moral  sense,  or  is  under 
the  influence  of  evil  companions,  serious 
dangers  are  likely  to  follow.  It  is  also 
at  this  critical  time,  between  the  ages  of 
thirteen  and  twenty-one,  that  boys  be- 
come irritable  and  petulant.  They  ex- 
perience a feeling  of  contrariness.  They 
are  untractable  and  at  times  even  rebel- 
lious. It  is  during  this  period  that  many 
boys  and  girls,  whose  parents  do  not 
understand  their  condition,  and  who 
have  forgotten  their  own  feelings  and 
experiences  when  at  the  same  age,  desire 
to  break  loose  from  all  restraint  and 
sometimes  even  to  run  away  from  home. 
It  is  at  this  time  that  the  boy  who  was 
formerly  obedient  and  studious  often 
becomes  restive,  disobedient,  and  unruly. 
Boys  between  the  years  of  fourteen  and 
eighteen  are  more  likely  to  be  dis- 
obedient to  their  teachers  in  the  day 
school,  and  it  is  just  at  this  age  that  they 
are  likely  to  feel  that  they  are  too  old 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  179 

to  go  to  Sunday-school,  and  are  not  so 
likely  to  go  willingly  to  church  or  attend 
to  their  religious  duties.  The  entire 
nature  feels  the  revolution  that  is  taking 
place,  and  all  the  worst  qualities  in  the 
boy’s  composition  appear  upon  the  sur- 
face. This  is  the  period  in  the  boy’s 
experience  which  the  Germans  call  “ The 
period  of  storm  and  stress.”  If  the  boy 
is  made  intelligent,  and  his  parents  and 
teachers  understand  and  appreciate  what 
the  boy  is  passing  through,  all  will 
eventually  turn  out  better  than  the  indi- 
cations seem  to  promise,  and  as  the 
young  man  approaches  the  age  of  twenty 
and  upward  the  storm  will  have  passed 
by.  And  if  he  has  been  guarded  from 
evil  and  kept  from  sin  his  future  will  be 
increasingly  calm,  blessed,  and  prosper- 
ous. But  if  vice  and  evil  have  come  into 
his  life  the  years  will  bring  an  increasing 
installment  of  passion  and  sin,  of  disap- 
pointment and  suffering. 

You  see,  my  dear  boy,  how  important 
it  is  that  at  this  time,  which  is  usually 
the  most  trying  in  one’s  entire  life,  that 
a boy  should  not  be  left  to  grope  in  dark- 
ness and  ignorance  among  physical  and 


180  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW \ 

moral  dangers  of  the  most  serious  nature. 
Only  those  who  have  passed  through 
this  “ time  of  storm  and  stress,”  and 
have  been  observant  of  their  emotions 
and  experiences,  and  have  thought  and 
reasoned  intelligently  concerning  them, 
can  wholly  appreciate  the  keen,  sensitive 
condition,  the  strong  temptations,  and 
the  great  need  of  wise  counsel,  helpful 
sympathy,  and  the  assistance  of  some- 
one who  will  know  how  to  interpret  to 
the  inexperienced  the  lessons  which  God 
is  teaching  and  the  great  duties  and  re- 
sponsibilities for  which  God,  in  infinite 
wisdom  and  love,  is  preparing  the  com- 
ing man. 

To-morrow  night  I will  send  you  my 
last  cylinder,  and  I shall  desire  to  advise 
you  how  to  prepare  for  this  approaching 
change  and  make  a few  other  sugges- 
tions which  are  prompted  by  my  love 
for  you  and  my  abounding  interest  in 
boys  and  young  men. 


CYLINDER  XXI. 


The  Last  Talk. — Desire  to  Prepare  You  for  the 
Coming  Manhood. — Purity  like  the  Dew.— 
Boys  Impatient  for  Developing  Manhood. — 
Different  Ages  at  which  Puberty  Occurs  in 
Different  Individuals.  — Causes  of  Diver- 
sity.— Appears  Earliest  in  Diseased  Bodies 
and  Latest  in  the  Healthiest. — Illustrated  in 
Diseased  Fruit.-— The  Boys  with  the  Best 
Bodily  Health  Experience  the  Least  Trials 
during  the  Developing  Years. — Early  Devel- 
opment Means  Early  Decay.- — Years  of 
Adolescence  a Period  of  Special  Danger. — • 
Our  Parting  Counsel. — Danger  of  Defer- 
ring.— Immediate  Development  of  Physical, 
Intellectual,  and  Moral  Powers  of  Utmost 
Importance. — “ How  Shall  We  Escape  if  We 
Neglect.” — Moral  Nature  Most  Important  of 
All. — What  Satan  Will  Say. — The  Results 
Are  Inevitable. — Do  Not  Defer. — Covenant 
with  God. 

My  Dear  Friend  Harry:  Nearly  a 
month  has  passed  since  I began  these 
Talks  to  you  into  the  phonograph.  I 
have  spoken  to  you  out  of  a heart  full 
of  interest  and  sympathy  for  boys,  and 

x8x 


i 82  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

what  otherwise  would  have  been  a task 
has  been  to  me  a source  of  no  little 
pleasure.  I am  to-night  to  have  my  last 
Talk  with  you  upon  these  important  sub- 
jects, and  I am  pleased  to  hope  that  all 
I have  said  from  night  to  night  has  been 
to  you  a matter  of  valuable  interest  and 
satisfactory  information. 

By  what  I said  last  night  you  will  see 
that  I have  desired  to  prepare  your  mind 
for  the  changes  which  you  must  meet 
a little  later  on  in  life.  I have  desired 
that  in  your  passage  from  boyhood  to 
manhood  you  may  avoid  the  perplexities 
and  dangers  which  prove  so  disastrous 
to  many.  Purity  is  something  like  the 
dew  which  in  the  morning  sparkles  in 
‘crystal  beauty  on  grass  and  flower,  but 
when  once  brushed  away  by  a ruthless 
hand  it  cannot  be  restored  by  art  or  skill 
of  man,  although  all  the  waters  of  the 
world  were  placed  at  his  command. 

Knowing  how  natural  it  is  for  all  boys 
to  desire  to  be  men,  and  how  impatient 
some  boys  become  when  they  note  in 
others  developments  and  changes  which 
have  not  come  to  them,  I desire  to  ap- 
prise you  of  a serious  mistake  in  judg- 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  183 

ment  which  most  boys  make,  and  which 
is  liable  to  prompt  them  to  evil  practices. 
These  practices,  instead  of  hastening 
manly  development,  result  in  weakness 
and  disease,  and,  as  a consequence,  de- 
feat the  very  end  they  have  sought  to 
secure. 

The  age  at  which  puberty  is  reached, 
and  the  changes  take  place,  concern- 
ing which  I told  you  last  night, 
varies  in  different  individuals.  In 
boys  these  changes  begin  in  rare  and 
exceptional  cases  as  early  as  twelve 
years,  while  in  other  exceptional  cases 
they  are  delayed  as  late  as  the  eighteenth 
year.  This  variation  is  due  somewhat 
to  nationality,  race,  or,  more  frequently, 
to  climate,  but  most  frequently  to  con- 
ditions of  bodily  disease  or  health  in  the 
individual.  In  warm  countries  this  de- 
velopment comes  earlier,  and  in  the  cold 
northwest  climate,  much  later.  Colored 
boys  tend  to  develop  earlier  than  white 
boys.  Temperament,  occupation,  and 
habits  have  much  to  do  in  determining 
this  matter,  but,  as  I said,  the  condition 
of  the  health  produces  the  greatest  varia- 
tion of  all.  It  is  generally  found  that 


x84  wha  t a young  boy  ought  to  know. 

boys  who  have  inherited  a weak,  nervous 
constitution,  or  who  suffer  from  poor 
health,  are  the  first  to  develop  the 
changes  which  indicate  the  approach 
and  presence  of  puberty;  while,  upon  the 
other  hand,  the  general  rule  is  that  the 
boys  who  live  mostly  in  the  open  air,  are 
engaged  in  pursuits  which  call  for  vigor- 
ous bodily  exercise,  and  who  are  given 
to  such  manly  sports  as  develop  a strong 
body  and  good  health,  are  slower  in  ex- 
periencing these  changes. 

This  is  only  another  manifestation  of 
what  every  boy  has  noticed  in  fruit. 
While  growing  upon  the  trees  the  first 
few  apples,  peaches,  cherries,  and  other 
kinds  of  fruit  that  turn  red  and  appear 
ripe,  while  the  great  mass  of  fruit  has 
not  yet  approached  maturity,  may  look 
promising  to  the  eye,  but  when  they  are 
examined  they  are  always  found  to  be 
wormy  and  diseased. 

The  boy  who  seeks  early  maturity  by 
sinful  practices  only  secures  in  its  place 
weakness  and  disease,  while  the  boy  who 
is  careful  to  observe  all  the  laws  of  health, 
and  who  develops  a strong,  manly  frame, 
and  establishes  good  bodily  health,  will 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  185 

experience  less  irritation,  nervousness, 
and  sexual  sensitiveness,  and  will  pass 
into  manhood  without  encountering  the 
trials  and  perplexities  which  come  to 
those  who  suffer  from  inherited  or  ac- 
quired bodily  weakness  or  disease.  By 
no  means,  my  dear  boy,  ever  covet  that 
early  development  which  could  confer 
upon  you  nothing  that  is  to  be  truly  de- 
sired, for  early  maturity  means  early 
decay. 

By  proper  food,  daily  bathing,  and  by 
exercise  in  the  fresh  air,  which  should 
not  be  too  violent  nor  too  prolonged,  but 
yet  sufficiently  frequent  and  vigorous, 
you  should  seek  to  acquire  that  bodily 
and  mental  vigor  which  will  prepare  you 
for  many  years  of  good  health  and  great 
usefulness. 

The  years  of  adolescence,  which  be- 
gin in  boys  at  about  the  age  of  fourteen 
and  continue  until  they  are  about 
twenty-five,  are  fraught  with  perplexi- 
ties, trials,  and  much  danger.  It  is  dur- 
ing these  years  that  most  boys  make  mis- 
takes and  go  wrong;  some  physically, 
some  intellectually,  some  morally,  and 
some  in  all  three  of  these  respects. 


l86  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. \ 

These  mistakes  for  the  most  part  grow 
out  of  the  ignorance  of  the  individual. 
I am  persuaded  that  very  few  boys  de- 
liberately and  willfully  go  wrong,  but 
they  sin  in  their  ignorance,  and  continue 
until  vices  become  fixed  habits,  and  ruin 
becomes  inevitable. 

It  is  on  this  account  that  I have 
thought  it  necessary  to  apprise  you  of 
these  changes,  that  being  warned  in  early 
boyhood  you  may,  by  physical  culture, 
acquire  such  bodily  strength  and  vigor 
as  will  enable  you  to  pass  through  this 
period  with  perfect  safety,  and  enter 
upon  your  mature  years  a noble,  pure, 
and  godly  man.  If  you  will  remember 
what  I have  said,  and  be  faithful  to  carry 
out  the  suggestions  which  I have  made, 
I think  you  will  be  in  possession  of  such 
information  upon  the  subject  of  the  re- 
productive organs  as  will  serve  you  until 
your  fifteenth  or  sixteenth  year,  when 
you  will  need  the  further  information  and 
suggestions  which  I have  embodied  in  a 
book  entitled  “ What  a Young  Man 
Ought  to  Know,”  and  which  I was  just 
completing  when  I received  your 
Mamma’s  note,  which  led  to  my  sending 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  1 87 

you  the  series  of  Talks  in  the  phono- 
graph which  will  be  concluded  with  this 
cylinder. 

And  now,  my  dear  friend  Harry,  be- 
fore parting,  I desire  to  warn  you  against 
one  dangerous  mistake  which  thousands 
of  people  make — namely,  the  mistake  of 
deferring.  You  may  admit  the  truth  of 
all  that  I have  said,  and  honestly  purpose 
to  accept  and  act  upon  it,  but  instead  of 
doing  so  immediately  you  may  defer  to 
some  future  time,  and  thus  by  neglect 
eventually  and  irretrievably  lose  all  that 
you  hope  to  attain.  You  may  reason, 
as  so  many  do,  that  you  are  strong  and 
well;  that  you  are  reasonably  happy; 
and  that,  as  you  are  still  very  young,  you 
can  indulge  your  appetite,  neglect  your 
soul,  violate  God’s  physical  and  moral 
laws,  and  later  on,  atone  for  the  past  by 
proper  exercise,  careful  diet,  and  a re- 
ligious life.  While  you  have  been  saved 
from  the  secret  sin  which  is  ruining 
others,  yet  the  care  of  your  health,  and 
the  development  of  your  physical,  intel- 
lectual, and  spiritual  powers,  are  of  the 
utmost  immediate  importance.  At  no 
other  time  in  your  life  can  you  so  easily 


l88  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW. 

and  successfully  acquire  the  best  of  each 
of  these  desirable  endowments  as  at  the 
immediate  present. 

Let  the  words  from  the  Scriptures  ring 
in  your  ears,  “ how  shall  we  escape  if 
we  neglect?  ” (Hebrews  ii.  3.)  In 
order  to  grow  up  in  ignorance,  all  that  a 
boy  needs  to  do  is  to  neglect  his  books 
and  his  school.  In  order  to  become  a 
bankrupt,  a merchant  need  not  squander 
his  money;  he  need  not  make  unprofit- 
able investments;  simply  let  him  neglect 
his  business  duties,  and  bankruptcy  is 
inevitable.  The  farmer  does  not  need  to 
sow  his  fields  with  weeds.  Simply  let 
him  neglect  his  fields,  and  weeds  will  fill 
them,  thorns  and  bushes  will  half  conceal 
his  broken  fences,  and  universal  ruin  will 
come  as  the  inevitable  result  of  simple 
neglect. 

And  so,  my  dear  boy,  even  though  you 
have  already  attained  the  very  best  phys- 
ical, intellectual,  and  spiritual  culture, 
yet  if  you  fail  to  guard  and  keep  such 
attainments  by  constant  exercise  and  use, 
you  will  surely  lose  them.  If  these  things 
are  so,  then  how  shall  you  escape  from 
the  result  of  indifference  and  delay,  if  in 


WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW.  189 

the  beginning  you  neglect  these  impor- 
tant matters? 

You  may  accept  and  act  upon  what  I 
have  suggested  concerning  your  physical 
and  intellectual  natures  but  neglect 
your  spiritual  nature,  which  is  most 
important  of  all.  Satan  is  sure  to  whis- 
per that  what  I have  said  is  all  true,  but 
that  you  are  young,  and  that  later  on  in 
life,  after  you  have  finished  your  school 
days,  and  are  established  in  business, 
then  you  will  have  plenty  of  time  to  at- 
tend to  spiritual  matters,  and  thus  tempt 
you,  from  year  to  year,  simply  to  defer 
until  your  best  years,  and  if  possible, 
all  your  years,  shall  have  been  lost  to 
Christ  and  your  own  happiness  by  simple 
neglect. 

No;  do  not  defer,  do  not  neglect.  For 
if  you  do,  you  cannot  escape  from  the  sad 
results  of  such  a mistake.  Weakness 
and  disease  will  then  be  sure  to  despoil 
you  of  manly  power;  ignorance  will  set 
up  its  throne  where  intelligence  should 
reign,  and  the  spiritual  nature,  which 
God  would  restore  again  to  His  own 
likeness  and  image,  Satan  will  further 
disfigure  and  deface  by  vice  and  sin. 


19°  WHA  T A YOUNG  BOY  OUGHT  TO  KNOW \ 

These  results  are  inevitable,  and  cannot 
be  escaped  if  you  neglect. 

My  dear  boy,  do  not  defer.  May  I 
ask  you  now,  as  I bid  you  good-by  to- 
night, to  go  apart  immediately,  and  alone 
upon  your  knees  ask  God,  for  Christ’s 
sake,  to  forgive  your  sins,  to  give  you  a 
clean,  pure,  and  loving  heart,  and  to  take 
you  into  everlasting  covenant  with  Him- 
self. Covenant  to  serve  Him  faithfully 
from  this  hour,  and  may  God  abundantly 
bless  you  in  this  world,  and  in  the  next 
crown  you  with  everlasting  honor  and 
glory! 


THE  END. 


OFFICES  OF  PUBLICATION 


IN  THE)  UNITED  STATES 

THE  VIR  PUBLISHING  COMPANY 

2237  I^AND  TlTLE  BUILDING 
PHIEADEEHHIA,  pa. 


IN  ENGLAND 

THE  VIR  PUBLISHING  COMPANY 

7 Imperial  Arcade,  Ludgate  Circus 

LONDON,  e.  c. 

IN  CANADA 

WILLIAM  BRIGGS 

29.33  Richmond  Street  West 

TORONTO,  ONTARIO 


“What  a Young  Man  Ought  to 
Know” 


WHAT  EMINENT  PEOPLE  SAY 

Francis  E.  Clark,  D.  D. 

“It  is  written  reverently  but  very  plainly,  and  I 
believe  will  save  a multitude  of  young  men  from  evils 
unspeakable.” 

John  Clifford,  D.  D. 

“One  of  the  best  books  for  dawning  manhood  that 
has  fallen  into  my  hands.  It  goes  to  the  roots  of  human 
living.  It  is  thoroughly  manly.” 

J.  Wilbur  Chapman,  D.  D. 

“I  bear  willing  testimony  that  I believe  this  book 
ought  to  be  in  the  hands  of  every  young  man  in  this 
country.” 


Paul  F*  Munde,  M*  D.,  LL.  D. 

Professor  of  Gyncecology  in  the  New  York  Polyclinic 
and  at  Dartmouth  College. 

“I  most  heartily  commend  not  only  the  principle  but 
the  execution  of  what  it  aims  to  teach.” 

The  Right  Rev*  William  N.  McVickar,  D*  D* 

“I  heartily  endorse'  and  recommend  ‘What  a Young 
Man  Ought  to  Know.’  I believe  that  it  strikes  at  the 
very  root  of  matters.” 

Ethelbert  D.  Warfield,  LL.  D. 

“The  subject  is  one  of  the  utmost  personal  and  social 
importance,  and  hitherto  has  not  been  treated,  so  far  as 
I am  aware,  in  such  a way  as  to  merit  the  commendation 
of  the  Christian  public. 

Frank  W.  Ober 

“It  will  save  many  a young  fellow  from  the  blast  and 
blight  of  a befouled  manhood,  wrecked  by  the  wretched 
blunderings  of  an  ignorant  youth.” 

Frederick  Anthony  Atkins 

“Such  books  as  yours  have  long  been  needed,  and  if 
they  had  appeared  sooner  many  a social  wreck,  whose 
fall  was  due  to  ignorance,  might  have  been  saved.” 


What  a Young  Girl  Ought  to 
Know” 

WHAT  EMINENT  PEOPLE  SAY 


Francis  E.  Willard,  LL.  D. 

“I  do  earnestly  hope  that  this  book,  founded  on  a 
strictly  scientific  but  not  forgetting  a strong  ethical 
basis,  may  be  well  known  and  widely  read  by  the  dear 
girls  in  their  teens  and  the  young  women  in  their  homes.*8 

Mrs.  Elizabeth  B.  Grannis 

“These  facts  ought  to  be  judiciously  brought  to  the 
intelligence  of  every  child  whenever  it  asks  questions 
concerning  its  own  origin.” 

Mrs.  Harriet  Lincoln  Coolidge 

“It  is  a book  that  mothers  and  daughters  ought  to 
own.** 

Mrs.  Katharine  L.  Stevenson 

“The  book  is  strong,  direct,  pure,  as  healthy  as  a 
breeze  from  the  mountain-top.” 

Mrs.  Isabelle  MacDonald  Alden,  “Pansy” 

“It  is  just  the  book  needed  to  teach  what  most  people 
do  not  know  how  to  teach,  being  scientific,  simple  and 
plain-spoken,  yet  delicate.” 

Miss  Grace  H.  Dodge 

“I  know  of  no  one  who  writes  or  speaks  on  these  great 
subjects  with  more  womanly  touch  than  Mrs.  Wood- 
Alien,  nor  with  deeper  reverence.  When  I listen  to  her 
I feel  that  she  has  been  inspired  by  a Higher  Power.” 

Ira  D.  Sankey 

“Every  mother  in  the  laud  that  has  a daughter  should 
secure  for  her  a copy  of  “What  a Young  Girl  Ought  to 
Know.”  It  will  save  the  world  untold  sorrow. ’* 


64  What  a Young  Woman  Ought 
to  Know” 


WHAT  EMINENT  PEOPLE  SAY 

Lady  Henry  Somerset 

“ An  extremely  valuable  book,  and  I wish  that  it  may 
be  widely  circulated.” 


Mrs.  Laura  Ormiston  Chant 

“ The  book  ought  to  be  in  the  hands  of  every  girl  on 
her  fifteenth  birthday,  as  a safe  guide  and  teacher  along 
the  difficult  path  of  womanhood.” 


Margaret  Warner  Morley 

“There  is  an  awful  need  for  the  book,  and  it  does 
what  it  has  undertaken  to  do  better  than  anything  of  the 
kind  I ever  read.” 


Mrs*  May  Wright  Sewall 

“ I am  profoundly  grateful  that  a subject  of  such  in- 
formation to  young  woman  should  be  treated  in  a man- 
ner at  once  so  noble  and  so  delicate.” 


Elizabeth  Cady  Stanton 

“ It  is  a grave  mistake  for  parents  to  try  to  keep  their 
children  ignorant  of  the  very  ^questions  on  which  they 
should  have  scientific  information.” 


Lillian  M.  N*  Stevens 

“ There  is  a great  need  of  carefully,  delicately  written 
books  upon  the  subjects  treated  in  this  series.  I am 
gratefully  glad  that  the  author  has  succeeded  so  well, 
and  I trust  great  and  enduring  good  will  be  the  result.” 


Mrs*  Matilda  B.  Carse 

“It  is  pure  and  instructive  on  the  delicate  subjects 
that  mean  so  much  to  our  daughters,  to  their  future  as 
homekeepers,  wives  and  mothers,  and  to  the  future  gen- 
erations.” 


JUST  PUBLISHED 


A New  Devotional  Book 


“ Faces  Toward  the  Light” 


Author  of  “Methods  of  Church  Work,”  “Five-Minute 
Object  Sermons  to  Children,”  “ Talks  to  the 
King's  Children,”  “Bible  Selections 
for  Daily  Devotion,”  etc. 


SOME  CHAPTERS  IN  THE  BOOK 

Glory  After  Gloom. — The  Dangerous  Hour. — 
The  Concealed  Future. — Gleaning  for  Christ. — 
Hunger  and  Health. — Direction  and  Destiny. — 
God  of  the  Valleys. — Coins  and  Christians. — 
Reserved  Blessings. — Comfort  in  Sorrow. — The 
Better  Service. — Not  Knowing  Whither. — Good, 
but  Good  for  Nothing. — No  Easy  Place. — The 
Dead  Prayer  Office. — How  God  Reveals  Him- 
self.— Starting  Late. — Source  of  Power. — Toil- 
ing at  a Heavy  Tow. — What  He  Gave  and  What 
He  Got. — Vacation  Lessons. — Wheat  or  Weeds, 
etc.,  etc.,  etc. 


BY 


SYLVANUS  STALL,  D.D. 


JUST  PUBLISHED 


New  Revised  Edition 


“Manhood's  Morning" 

BY  JOSEPH  ALFRED  CONWELL 


Chapter  i,  Twelve  Million  Young  Men. 
.Chapter  2,  The  Best  Years  of  Life.  Chapter  3, 
What  Some  Young  Men  Have  Done.  Chapter 
4,  Wild  Oats  and  Other  Weeds.  Chapter  5, 
Reason  Why  Young  Men  Go  Wrong.  Chapter 
6,  Paying  the  Piper.  Chapter  7,  Where  Young 
Men  Belong.  Chapter  8,  What  Young  Men 
Must  Be.  Chapter  9,  What  Young  Men  Must 
Do. 


From  Prof.  Lyman  B.  Sperry,  M.D.,  Lecturer 


“Every  young  man  should  read  it  yearly  from  the 
time  he  is  fourteen  till  he  is  twenty -eight.” 

Bishop  J.  H.  Vincent,  LL.D.,  Chancellor  of 
Chautauqua  University 

“Every  minister  who  deals  with  young  men,  and 
every  young  man  who  cares  to  avoid  evil  and  loves 
righteousness  should  read  the  book.” 

Frances  E.  Willard,  President  National 
W.  C.  T.  U. 

“ We  advise  parents  to  send  for  a copy  of  this  book 
to  give  as  a present  to  their  sons.” 


T.  J.  Sanders,  A.M.,  Ph.D.,  President  Otterbein 


“A  remarkable  series  of  Chapters  to  young  men— 
stimulating  and  suggestive.” 


An  Invaluable  Book  for  Every  Young  Man 


COMMENDATIONS 


and  Author 


University,  Ohio 


OTHER  BOOKS 

BY 

SYVANUS  STALL,  D.  D. 

Five-Minute  Object  Sermons  to  Children 

“ Far  better  than  N ewton’s,  the  anecdotes  and  subjects 
of  which  have  long  since  become  common  property. 
Many  of  the  subjects  are  very  fresh  and  telling.”— New 
York  Evangelist. 

Cloth,  253  pp.  Price,  $1.00,  post  free. 

Talks  to  the  King's  Children 

“The  Rev.  Dr.  Sylvanus  Stall,  is  one  of  the  best 
preachers  for  young  people  in  the  American  pulpit.  His 
4 Five-Minute  Object  Sermons  ’ to  children  was  an  ideal 
book  in  its  class.  The  present  volume  is  a second  series 
of  the  same  kind,  and  will  be  found  to  have  no  less  point 
and  charm  than  the  volume  published  two  years  ago.”— 
New  York  Independent. 

Cloth,  249  pp.  Price  $1.00,  post  free. 

Methods  of  Church  Work 

“It  is  stimulating,  helpful,  worth  its  weight  in  gold  to 
any  minister  who  wishes  to  accomplish  anything  for  the 
kingdom  of  Christ.” — New  York  Christian  Intelligencer. 

Cloth,  304  pp.  Price  $1.50,  post  free. 

Bible  Selections  for  Daily  Devotion. 

The  most  spiritual  and  helpful  portion  of  the  entire 
Bible  arranged  in  the  order  of  the  original  text.  Com- 
prises about  one-third  of  the  whole  Bible. 

“ That  there  has  been  a great  falling  off  in  the  good 
old  custom  of  daily  family  worship,  there  can  be  no 
doubt.  Just  how  much  of  this  deplorable  condition  is 
due  to  the  difficulty  of  hastily  selecting  Scriptural  pas-* 
sages  suited  to  the  service,  it  might  be  difficult  to  deter-* 
mine.  But  fully  persuaded  that  this  is  an  obstacle  of 
considerable  moment,  Dr.  Stall,  after  some  three  year’s 
work,  has  selected  a series  of  365  devotional  readings 
from  Genesis  to  Revelation.”— Christian  Advocate,  Pitts- 
burg. 

Cloth,  i2mo.,  686  pages.  Price,  $1.00,  post  free. 

Pastor's  Pocket  Record 

( U ndenominational. ) 

“Its  departments  covers  everything  a minister  wishes 
to  record.”— W.  F.  Crafts,  D.  D. 

20  Departments.  200  pp.,  Devant  morocco.  Price,  50c. 


ADDRESS  ADD  ORDERS  TO 

The  Vir  Publishing  Company* 


OTHER  BOOKS 

BY 

Mrs,  Mary  Wood-Alien,  M.  D. 

“Man  Wonderful, 

or  Marvels  of  Our  Bodily  Dwelling” 

This  book  teaches  the  young  Physiology  and  Hygiene, 
by  metaphor,  parable  and  allegory  in  a most  charming 
•way.  i2mo.,  cloth,  328  pp.,  $1.00,  post  free. 

“The  Birth  Chamber” 

A supplementary  chapter  to  the  44  Marvels  of  Our  Bod- 
ily Dwelling. 44  _ It  contains  the  scientific  facts  of  special 
physiology,  written  in  Dr.  Mary  Wood-Alien’s  own  deli- 
cate style.  Price,  10  cents,  post  free. 

“Child  Confidence  Rewarded” 

Designed  to  aid  mothers  in  guiding  the  first  outgoings 
of  the  child-mind  concerning  the  origin  of  life,  so  as  to 
preserve  the  coming  men  and  women  in  truth  and  purity. 
Price,  10  cents,  post  free. 

“Teaching  Truth” 

Addressed  to  mothers,  and  designed  to  teach  more 
exalted  ideas  concerning  God’s  great  gift  of  fatherhood 
and  motherhood.  Price,  25  cents,  post  free. 

“Almost  a Man” 

Very  valuable  to  mothers,  teachers,  and  all  who  have 
to  do  with  boys  of  twelve  and  fourteen  years  of  age.  It 
will  prove  a blessing  and  a help  to  all  who  read  it.  Price, 
25  cents,  post  free. 

“ Almost  a Woman  ” 

This  booklet  corresponds  with  the  one  by  the  same 
author  for  Boys.  Mothers  will  find  this  just  what  they 
have  been  wanting  to  put  into  the  hands  of  their  daugh- 
ters. Price,  25  cents,  post  free. 

“Baby's  Firsts” 

Tells  how  to  care  for  the  baby  from  the  first  moment 
of  its  birth.  Price,  35  cents,  postpaid. 

“Baby's  Record” 

A beautifully  bound  book,  with  a blank  page  for  baby’s 
photograph  and  every  important  event  in  baby’s  life.  Its 
first  smile,  first  tooth,  baby’s  sayings,  etc.,  etc.  Price, 
50  cents,  postpaid. 


ADDRESS  ADD  ORDERS  TO 

The  Vir  Publishing  Company* 


Talks  to  the  «£ 


King's  Children 

Second  Series  of  “Five-Minuta 
Object  Sermons.** 


BY 

SYLVANUS  STALL,  D.  D. 


Invaluable  in 


The  Home 
The  Sunday  School 
The  Pastor's  Library 
The  Mission  Field 


A CHILDREN’ S PEEACHeAi 


**  Dr.  Stall  has  few  equals  in  this  particular  line  of  writing. 
He  shows  a fine  reserve  in  not  allowing  the  object  used  to  over- 
shadow the  truth  taught.” — Nashville  Christian  Advocate. 

“ The  Rev.  Dr.  Sylvanus  Stall  is  one  of  the  best  preachers  for 
oung  people  in  the  American  pulpit.  His  ‘ Five-minute  Object 
ermons  ’ to  children  was  an  ideal  book  in  its  class.  The  present 
volume  is  a second  series  of  the  same  kind,  and  will  be  found  to 
have  no  less  point  and  charm  than  the  volume  published  two 
years  ago.” — New  York  Independent. 

“ The  author  is  well-known  in  this  community,  having  been  a 
pastor  in  Baltimore  City  for  several  years.  He  is  an  adept  cer- 
tainly in  furnishing  bright,  interesting  talks  to  children.  He 
writes  with  a vigorous,  irresistible  pen.” — Baltimore  Methodist. 

THE  CHILDREN  GOOD  JUDGES. 

“ Those  who  have  had  the  genuine  pleasure  and  profit  of  Dr. 
Stall’s  first  series  of  children’s  sermons  will  welcome  this  second 
volume.  We  have  read  them  with  the  children  and  commend 
them  very  highly.  The  children  know  a good  sermon  when  they 
hear  it l*— Reformed  Church  Messenger. 

especially  to  the  young  mind.”— 

Price,  $1.00  per  copy. 


“ Irresistibly  interesting, 
Christian  Work. 


Five-minute 
Object  Sermons  •* 

To  Children 

BY 

SYLVANUS  STALL,  D.D. 

& 

"Through  Eye-Gate  and  Ear-Gate 
into  the  City  of  Child-Soul/' 

PRESS  NOTICES 

“ They  are  animated  in  style,  bright,  interesting,  and 
practical,” — The  Advance. 

“ The  object  of  the  author  is  to  present  the  cardinal  truths 
of  salvation  in  simple  language,  illustrated  by  common 
every-day  objects,  after  the  manner  of  our  Tord’s  parables. 
Delightful  and  instructive  reading  for  the  family  circle  on 
Sunday  afternoons,” — The  Ram's  Horn. 

“ It  begins  with  an  introductory  essay,  which  is  a capital 
treatment  of  the  whole  question  of  children  in  church,  and 
well  worth  the  cost  of  the  book.  He  never  fails  in  interest 
and  instruction.” — Sunday-School  Times. 

“ We  do  not  know  that  we  can  give  a stronger  commen- 
dation to  this  little  volume  than  to  state  that  on  a brief  ex- 
amination of  it  we  got  the  suggestion  for  a series  of  half  a 
dozen  evening  sermons  to  the  young  people.” — The  Chris- 
tian Statesman. 

“Excellent,  admirable,  irresistible.  The  author  is  a 
genius.  There  is  not  a dull  line  between  these  cirTevs.  The 
author  exhibits  a new  way  of  preaching  the  Gosoel.  The 
deepest  truths  are  presented  in  the  concrete.” — The  Golden 
Rule.  Price,  $1.00  per  copy. 


Five-minute  Object  Sermons— Continued 


Unsolicited  Commendations 

“ Gooty,  South  India. 

“ The  sermons  are  very  suggestive,  stimulating,  and  help- 
ful. They  do  not  lose  any  of  their  force  when  put  in  our  ver- 
nacular garb.” — Silas  Burder,  Converted  Brahmin  and 
Headmaster  of  Christian  Training  Institute. 

“ Saga,  Japan. 

“Please  send  me  a copy  of  Stall’s  ' Five-minute  Sermons 
to  Children.’  I have  heard  this  book  highly  commended 
by  a Presbyterian  missionary  for  use  among  the  Japanese.” 
—Rev.  J.  A.  B.  Scherer,  Lutheran  Missionary. 

“Steelton,  Pa. 

“ Our  daughter  Allie,  only  seven  years  old,  can’t  wait  till 
evening  to  have  us  read  the  sermons,  which  she  readily 
understands.  H.  E.  Mbssner.” 

“Albany,  N.  Y. 

“ Just  what  I have  wanted  for  the  children.  I read  them 
four  sermons  each  evening,  and  then  they  want  me  to  con- 
tinue. Mrs.  Deborah  A.  Vosburg.” 

“Moose  meadow,  Conn. 
“Sylvanus  Stall,  D.D.,  Philadelphia,  Pa. 

“ Reverend  Sir: — I wish  to  thank  you  in  behalf  of  my  school 
children  for  having  your  short  sermons  to  children  pub- 
lished. I read  them  to  my  school  children  as  a part  of  our 
devotional  exercises,  and  I often  hear  remarks  like  these: 
* I wish  the  author  would  come  to  Moose  Meadow.  I wish 
I could  hear  him.  I wish  I could  see  him  and  thank  him 
for  writing  those  sermons.  Can’t  we  write  to  him  and  thank 
him?’  etc.  And  so  I have  been  led  to  write  you,  thanking 
you  in  their  behalf.  Have  you  published  any  other  books 
along  the  same  line? 

“ Moose  Meadowis  a small  country  place  in  Eastern  Con- 
necticut, and  I wished  you  to  know  that  the  country  chil- 
dren enjoy  your  sermons  equally  well  as  city  children,  and  I 
am  very  thankful  that  a copy  of  your  book  was  put  into  my 
hands.  I feel  very  grateful  to  God  for  putting  it  into  the 
heart  of  some  one  to  write  such  interesting  sermons  and 
beautiful  object  lessons. 

“ Respectfully,  Mrs.  A.  B.  Dawe.” 


i2mo.  Cloth,  253  pp.  Price,  $i.«o,  post  free. 


ADDRESS  ALL  ORDERS  TO 

THE  VIR  PUBLISHING  COMPANY